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Old 05-07-2011, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia Pa
1,527 posts, read 1,462,114 times
Reputation: 557
Cherry Hill Nj, Media Pa, West Chester Pa, Ambler Pa, Ardmore Pa, Doylestown Pa. Wilmington De on a larger scale.
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Old 05-07-2011, 07:03 PM
 
84 posts, read 16,627 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Yes, and about every other Atlanta native that I know.
About 5-10% of Buckhead is urban in nature; otherwise, it's made up of single family neighborhoods. How is that not suburban?
And you can drop the attitude.

Buckhead - Atlanta, Georgia - Buckhead Neighborhood Map
Every city has neighborhoods made up of single family homes. That doesn't make them suburbs. They may be "suburban" in nature, but they aren't suburbs.
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Old 05-07-2011, 08:23 PM
 
Location: CT
1,215 posts, read 1,236,849 times
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I'm sure it's been said but if the op means what I think he means then the places he's thinking of would be all over New England and the Northeast, and in older places in the Southeast and Midwest and parts of the rest of the South. Pretty much anywhere where cities and towns developed a long time ago when every town was founded as it's own entity with it's own center no matter how small and not as an extension of a larger city; and then those places became suburbs to other cities that grew larger and took dominance over the area when first trains and then cars took over.
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Old 05-07-2011, 09:02 PM
 
940 posts, read 962,956 times
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Um, I think streetcar suburbs best fit what the OP is asking for. Yes, there are plenty of farming towns east of the mississippi that were overtaken by suburban growth, but these aren't accurately suburban downtowns. They were distinct towns not connected to the larger city that grew to overtake them.

Streetcar suburbs were actually designed as suburbs--the residents took the train into the city--and have small shopping streets/districts for the residents of the suburb. Many US cities have these.

Streetcar suburb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-07-2011, 11:10 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,012 posts, read 6,251,856 times
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I think all suburbs have some form of town center. Hinsdale, one suburb I used to spend a lot of time in, had its own town center.

If you're talking about a BIG town center, with skyscrapers and all, I know Seattle and the suburb of Bellevue are one example. There's a couple dozen buildings with more than 20 stories in Bellevue now, and they're all new (even just 5 years ago there were fewer). It's booming. Partially because Seattle is out of space, and partially because of Seattle idiotic politics (current mayor being a PERFECT case in point).
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Old 05-07-2011, 11:43 PM
 
2,062 posts, read 3,569,923 times
Reputation: 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by soug View Post
I don't really get the hate against the new town centers. Okay, so there isn't any history. But Main Street, USA didn't have any history at one point. These things take time.
You can tell a distinct story about the 100+ year history of each Chicago's railroad line suburbs. The faux Main Street town centers will all have the same story 100 years from now, Big Corporation plowed over the (cornfield, swamp, desert) and 6 months later our town was created. This assumes these "towns" will still be around. They were developed and built for specific uses, and are not nearly as adaptable as an organically developed community. Since these are master planned communities governed by a detailed code of rules, these buildings can't be easily renovated and redesigned over time. It would take some cataclysmic event to allow these buildings to be converted to cheap loft space for young artists the way warehouses in real cites are.

Also, $5 and up gas may discourage people from living in a brand new town in the middle of nowhere where every time you leave your home you need to get into your car. In addition, it's a matter of personal taste, but these new towns consist of identical buildings, often built to resemble some actual historic architecture, which is generally regarding as being rather tacky.

Other then that, these places are swell!
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Old 05-09-2011, 03:06 PM
 
5 posts, read 3,112 times
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Default Agreed: towns in Illinois that developed around the Railroad

Towns around the Railroad have a "natural" town center, a shopping districts, pedestrian friendly , with restuarants. I am from the Geneva, IL area; more than half the towns along that train line from Chicago have beautiful town centers.
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Old 05-09-2011, 03:43 PM
 
7,852 posts, read 12,430,167 times
Reputation: 2605
Quote:
Originally Posted by dweebo2220 View Post
Um, I think streetcar suburbs best fit what the OP is asking for. Yes, there are plenty of farming towns east of the mississippi that were overtaken by suburban growth, but these aren't accurately suburban downtowns. They were distinct towns not connected to the larger city that grew to overtake them.

Streetcar suburbs were actually designed as suburbs--the residents took the train into the city--and have small shopping streets/districts for the residents of the suburb. Many US cities have these.

Streetcar suburb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Aren't most streetcar suburbs former suburbs? All of the ones I know are now in the city and no longer considered suburban whatsoever. I didn't get the idea that the OP was looking for these at all.
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Old 05-09-2011, 03:44 PM
 
7,852 posts, read 12,430,167 times
Reputation: 2605
Quote:
Originally Posted by missRoxyhart View Post
I'm sure it's been said but if the op means what I think he means then the places he's thinking of would be all over New England and the Northeast, and in older places in the Southeast and Midwest and parts of the rest of the South. Pretty much anywhere where cities and towns developed a long time ago when every town was founded as it's own entity with it's own center no matter how small and not as an extension of a larger city; and then those places became suburbs to other cities that grew larger and took dominance over the area when first trains and then cars took over.
This.
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Old 05-09-2011, 07:13 PM
 
5,155 posts, read 3,354,295 times
Reputation: 2375
No, all suburbs do not include some form of town center. Case in point: the Washington, DC suburbs of Northern Virginia. People moving here bemoan the lack of little downtowns outside of DC proper, as they might be accustomed to (especially in the US northeast). The close-in, more urban places have business districts, like Arlington County, and Alexandria is a city in its own right (pre-dating DC); additionally there are small towns or cities like Fairfax, Vienna and Falls Church with distinct main streets and a town atmosphere. But a huge part of DC suburbia consists of sprawling subdivisions built on former pastures, where there is no town center or market, and shopping consists of driving from parking lot to parking lot. I do not consider strip malls or big box stores along a major access route to be a town center. Some places are now building strip malls to look like a town center, with quasi-Italianate turrets, clock tower, or other such artifice appended on to the mall building, now that "walkability" and a sense of community center is in vogue.
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