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Old 09-09-2013, 07:51 PM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,338,054 times
Reputation: 1954

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Yup, according to my link, for the 2010-2011 period the US average poverty rate was 15.9. NJ came in at 10.4 and CT came in at 10.9, both in 2011. New York came in at 16.0, just .1 above the national average.

The poverty rate doesn't take into effect many factors especially the cost of living.

Poverty Rates: How a Flawed Measure Drives Policy | The Fiscal Times


According to recent news, poverty in New Jersey is reaching a 50 some year high.

New Jersey Has A 25 Percent Poverty Rate And A Huge Percentage Of Millionaires Too

 
Old 09-09-2013, 08:06 PM
 
12,539 posts, read 10,414,651 times
Reputation: 17294
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoorSeattle View Post
Oh, we're backtracking now? Alright then.

Not sure whats wrong with MSAs as CSAs paint way too broad a picture. We want the picture to be as concentrated as possible if we're tracking these.


The wealth of the state of New Jersey is largely the result of being the offshoot of NYC and Philadelphia.

Nice suburbs, but the infrastructure leaves a lot to be desired for such a wealthy state. Dont get me started politically. North Jersey is mostly a concrete mess with quaint town here and decay there, factories, mill and industry. Not to mention the overbearing density and 4 seasons. Its a mess.
No it's not.
 
Old 09-09-2013, 08:07 PM
 
12,539 posts, read 10,414,651 times
Reputation: 17294
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwest1 View Post
The poverty rate doesn't take into effect many factors especially the cost of living.

Poverty Rates: How a Flawed Measure Drives Policy | The Fiscal Times


According to recent news, poverty in New Jersey is reaching a 50 some year high.

New Jersey Has A 25 Percent Poverty Rate And A Huge Percentage Of Millionaires Too
I think I'll stick with the US Census numbers rather than "a new study", thanks.
 
Old 09-09-2013, 09:36 PM
 
399 posts, read 769,291 times
Reputation: 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwest1 View Post
According to recent news, poverty in New Jersey is reaching a 50 some year high.

New Jersey Has A 25 Percent Poverty Rate And A Huge Percentage Of Millionaires Too



Ouch, thats gotta hurt!

And here comes the denial.
 
Old 09-09-2013, 09:38 PM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,338,054 times
Reputation: 1954
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I think I'll stick with the US Census numbers rather than "a new study", thanks.
Ok then.....you are basically then accepting the notion that someone living in rural Mississippi making 20,000 USD a year and someone living in NYC making 20,000 a year have the same standard of living? The higher cost of living in areas like metro NY and SF greatly mask the true magnitude of poverty in those regions. But go ahead, ignore that most basic fact and stick with the Feds one measurement fits the entire country.
 
Old 09-09-2013, 09:39 PM
 
399 posts, read 769,291 times
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Theyre championing unregulated capitalism, and the crooks they live near on that corrupt street.

Once again, as an Upstate NYer, and someone who has lived and spent ample time in NYC, I take Chicago, especially these days.

Practicality wins.
 
Old 09-09-2013, 10:17 PM
 
12,539 posts, read 10,414,651 times
Reputation: 17294
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwest1 View Post
Ok then.....you are basically then accepting the notion that someone living in rural Mississippi making 20,000 USD a year and someone living in NYC making 20,000 a year have the same standard of living? The higher cost of living in areas like metro NY and SF greatly mask the true magnitude of poverty in those regions. But go ahead, ignore that most basic fact and stick with the Feds one measurement fits the entire country.
So one article comes out and suddenly it's the holy grail? 1 in 4 New Jerseyans living in poverty, please. Second wealthiest state in the nation by median income with some of the nicest suburbs you can find in one of the best regions of the country. If NJ's doing that bad I want to see stats on other states. Next.

If you can't afford the NY area, don't live here.
 
Old 09-09-2013, 10:28 PM
 
399 posts, read 769,291 times
Reputation: 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
So one article comes out and suddenly it's the holy grail? 1 in 4 New Jerseyans living in poverty, please. Second wealthiest state in the nation by median income with some of the nicest suburbs you can find in one of the best regions of the country. If NJ's doing that bad I want to see stats on other states. Next.

If you can't afford the NY area, don't live here.

The US is also the wealthiest country in the world yet there are almost 50 million living in poverty, and its growing, courtesy of the 1%.

You dont see a problem with that?
 
Old 09-09-2013, 10:31 PM
 
12,539 posts, read 10,414,651 times
Reputation: 17294
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoorSeattle View Post
The US is also the wealthiest country in the world yet there are almost 50 million living in poverty, and its growing, courtesy of the 1%.

You dont see a problem with that?
I do. I often wish that, instead of trying to fix everyone else's problems around the world, whether they want us to or not, our government would keep money within the US and fix our own. You hear so much about poverty in Africa, I'll bet you few people know what places like Appalachia are like. It's pathetic.
 
Old 09-09-2013, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
5,302 posts, read 8,053,507 times
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I think that, if the weather was better, I'd choose Chicago, simply because it isn't as rude or crowded. BUT, since the weather in Chicago is absolutely horrific, I'd go with NYC, despite the fact that NYC is more expensive and the weather still sucks balls. But you can't deny that NYC does offer more, and that plays into my decision.
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