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Old 01-25-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
9,832 posts, read 7,684,322 times
Reputation: 6288

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Loads of just residential blocks with suburban-style SFHs in Los Angeles. Might have to get in a car and drive around for 15 minutes to see a pedestrian.
Keep the ignorance coming. I'm not pretending that still-sketchy Harlem is block after block of non-stop excitement.

 
Old 01-25-2012, 04:12 PM
 
51 posts, read 53,226 times
Reputation: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I think 'loads' of residential blocks of SFH in the area I am talking about is an exaggeration.

If you mean the entire city, yeah there are loads of them, especially in South LA and the Valley. But there still is a surprising amount of pedestrian traffic, you might be underrating it a bit. It's no Brooklyn or Queens, but at the same time it's not Houston with a bunch of empty lots either.
Yup. All munchitup (and a lot of other LA residents) are always trying to stress is that this stereotype that's propagated about LA, where it gets lumped in with anywhere from Houston to Phoenix for lack of walkability, is completely untrue and after a while starts to get grating. Walkability isn't some binary variable, where you absolutely have it or not. Yes LA is no Manhattan, but what people are trying to point out is that a very large area of Central LA is "quite" walkable and a decent portion is "extremely" walkable. And this does actually mean that if you didn't come pre-disposed to renting a car, you could most definitely access a tremendous number of amenities/attractions by walking/taking short hop public transit. And, a local would most definitely know this better than a tourist who has arrived with pre-conceptions of sprawl.

Is everything LA has to offer in a small 20sq mile area? No, of course not. Can you quite easily access a LOT of attractions, keeping you busy for a week, without a car? Hell yes. And trust me, you would appreciate the city a LOT more if you did. I know I did.
 
Old 01-25-2012, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,269,309 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
Keep the ignorance coming. I'm not pretending that still-sketchy Harlem is block after block of non-stop excitement.
You guys need to prove you're on par with Miami first. You guys are like Romney preparing for the general election when trailing Newt in the primary.

Can you provide any video or link that shows any portion of Los Angeles with 75% of Miami Beach's pedestrian activity?
 
Old 01-25-2012, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,122,648 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Didn't we already go over this in another thread? Koreatown is supposed to be an example of LA's supreme walkability, but you can clearly see from Google maps that it's not all that walkable. It's about as walkable as Far Rockaway, Queens.
I have to disagree, it is more walkable. Far Rockaway in the center isn't all that bad, but Koreatown is very walkable. I have a feeling this is starting to come down to aesthetics in some ways. How can you judge from google maps that it is not walkable?

If an apartment building is set back, it really has no affect on distance everyday amenities are.
 
Old 01-25-2012, 04:25 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,819,735 times
Reputation: 11136
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
A) I don't recall Munchitup conceding anything.

B)I already presented data that directly contradicts your BS claims. Hollywood is more dense (twice as dense at the residential level), and based on walkscore, more walkable.

It's loaded with tourists, has tons of nightlife, shopping, entertainment (any first run Broadway plays being shown in Miami Beach?), plus the Hollywood Bowl, classic movie palaces, museums, restaurants, and even a subway line.

West Hollywood is also a tourist favorite as its home to the Sunset Strip. The best collection of live music venues in the city are found here, plus comedy clubs, bars (like the notorious Viper Room), trendy boutiques, tourist spots (like the recording studio where MJ recorded "Thriller and Bad" and the hotel where John Belushi died) and on and on. It has world class everything (it is a celebrity playground after all), it's more dense than South Beach, more walkable. It's even more gay (lol), along Santa Monica Boulevard.

Not only do these two neighborhoods match all your criteria, they exceed it, as they have elements that Miami Beach does not have. They're also considerably safer neighborhoods.

That's two, but I would also include DTLA, Santa Monica, and Pasadena in to the mix. Pasadena and Long Beach, certainly as far as high culture is concerned.
I think it's important to realize that South Beach has an enormous part time residential population. The 12,000 ppl/square mile in Miami Beach doesn't count part time residents. My building alone is 40% part time residents. While these people don't "count" according to the Census, their presence is not insignificant. I think I heard that the number of people who are actually sleeping in Miami Beach on a daily basis is typically a quarter million (though I don't have a link to that statistic). At 7 square miles of land, and if we believe that #, that means Miami Beach is being typically occupied by almost 36,000 ppl/square mile at any given time. Now, if one considers that South Beach is probably less than 3 square miles and its fulltime residents near 40,000 and...if one considers that more than the lion's share of visitors stay in South Beach, the actual occupancy is probably much higher than 36,000 ppl/square mile.

If you are gong to toss adjacent LA communities into your argument, one can't ignore Miami proper with its amenities. From my west side South Beach condo, I can WALK to Miami's Performing Arts Center if I am up for a nice 20-25 minute walk across a gorgeous residential causeway with spectacular views. If I ride my bike, it takes me 5-7 minutes. If I want to stay on Miami Beach, I can attend the New World Symphony inside or attend on the lawn for the soundscape wallcast of the event for free on the side wall of the Frank Gehry designed facility. http://www.nws.edu/Wallcasts.aspx

We can also WALK to the beach and actually go in it without a wetsuit year-round.

I have been to Hollywood, West Hollywood, Santa Monica, etc. I even grew up in California. So, I am not hating on it. However, to suggest that South Beach is somehow less urban than any of them or combination thereof is just plain wrong.

Last edited by rnc2mbfl; 01-25-2012 at 04:39 PM..
 
Old 01-25-2012, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
9,832 posts, read 7,684,322 times
Reputation: 6288
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
You guys need to prove you're on par with Miami first. You guys are like Romney preparing for the general election when trailing Newt in the primary.

Can you provide any video or link that shows any portion of Los Angeles with 75% of Miami Beach's pedestrian activity?
Are you going to post that Will Smith video now? Lmao, Miami has been trying to be the "new L.A." for decades now, still trying. Maybe someday. It does have a good party strip...if you're 19 and think Jay-Z videos are high culture. Right up your alley.

Last edited by RaymondChandlerLives; 01-25-2012 at 04:53 PM..
 
Old 01-25-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,122,648 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I think it's important to realize that South Beach has an enormous part time residential population. The 12,000 ppl/square mile in Miami Beach doesn't count part time residents. My building alone is 40% part time residents. While these people don't "count" according to the Census, their presence is not insignificant. I think I heard that the number of people who are actually sleeping in Miami Beach on a daily basis is typically a quarter million (though I don't have a link to that statistic). At 7 square miles of land, and if we believe that #, that means Miami Beach is being typically occupied by almost 36,000 ppl/square mile at any given time. Now, if one considers that South Beach is probably less than 3 square miles and its fulltime residents near 40,000 and...if one considers that the more than the lion's share of visitors stay in South Beach, the actual occupancy is probably much higher than 36,000 ppl/square mile.
Interesting point. I didn't think about that... kind of like the college town effect.
 
Old 01-25-2012, 04:31 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,312 posts, read 2,587,015 times
Reputation: 1648
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I think it's important to realize that South Beach has an enormous part time residential population. The 12,000 ppl/square mile in Miami Beach doesn't count part time residents. My building alone is 40% part time residents. While these people don't "count" according to the Census, their presence is not insignificant. I think I heard that the number of people who are actually sleeping in Miami Beach on a daily basis is typically a quarter million (though I don't have a link to that statistic). At 7 square miles of land, and if we believe that #, that means Miami Beach is being typically occupied by almost 36,000 ppl/square mile at any given time. Now, if one considers that South Beach is probably less than 3 square miles and its fulltime residents near 40,000 and...if one considers that the more than the lion's share of visitors stay in South Beach, the actual occupancy is probably much higher than 36,000 ppl/square mile.
Good point. I've already alluded to this before. But trying to convey common sense to Raymond is like teaching a pig to sing. Impossible.
 
Old 01-25-2012, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,269,309 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
Are you going to post that Will Smith video now? Lmao, Miami has been trying to be the "new L.A." for decades now, still trying. Maybe someday. It does have a google at party strip...if you're 19 and think Jay-Z videos are high culture. Right up your alley.
Stop hating. Just buy yourself some white linen and a fedora, start pumping some weights, and get on a plane.


Miami Life- When night comes - YouTube
 
Old 01-25-2012, 04:40 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,773,778 times
Reputation: 4213
I think LA has PLENTY of walk-able areas. More so than Miami even. But Miami Beach specifically is a whole nother beast. But LA overall just has SOOO many more areas of walkabilty and vibrancy. At the same time Miami has places that don't get much exposure that are dense, walk-able and vibrant. I'm talking neighborhoods like Little Havana. BOTH cities are underrated in terms of vibrancy and dense walk-able neighborhoods.
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