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Old 07-11-2011, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh (via Chicago, via Pittsburgh)
3,887 posts, read 4,827,591 times
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Lol Chicago has plenty brownstones and apartment buildings..
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Old 07-11-2011, 08:56 AM
 
11,288 posts, read 23,420,487 times
Reputation: 11190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denver111 View Post
Chicago doesn't have many rowhouses or brownstones. It's a Midwest city. Not many rowhouses in the Midwest outside of Cincy and maybe St. Louis.

The prevailing housing in Chicago is the famous bungalow. Very, very different from the East Coast cities which are dominated by the apartment building (in NYC) or the rowhouse (in Philly and Baltimore).
Bungalow's are nowhere near the prevailing housing unit. From 2000:

10 units or more: 30%
3-9 units: 25%
Bungalows/single family: 24%
Brownstones: 18%
Rowhomes: 3%

Large multi-unit buildings are around 55%, bungalows are 24% and brownstones/rowhomes are 21%.



There are a lot of bungalows, and they're certainly famous because they look unique and fill many neighborhoods - but a majority of the city is multi-unit large residential buildings. Those stats are from 2000, before the construction of thousands of low-rise condos and the construction of many dozens of highrise condo buildings.

Bungalows were built from 1910 to 1940 in a swath about 5-8 miles from downtown Chicago. I've been here 10 years now and have never lived in any neighborhood with bungalows. I'm not sure I've actually seen that many, but I don't make it to the northwest/southeast/south sides that often.

Last edited by Chicago60614; 07-11-2011 at 09:06 AM..
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:22 AM
 
5,041 posts, read 8,927,372 times
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What are the houses that fill up the area around Midway. Coming in from the air, I can see miles and miles of bungalow styled houses that look like they are 5 inches apart with driveways on one side and set back far from the street. Chicago is not a rowhouse city.
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Cardboard box
1,909 posts, read 3,418,365 times
Reputation: 1328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Bungalow's are nowhere near the prevailing housing unit. From 2000:

10 units or more: 30%
3-9 units: 25%
Bungalows/single family: 24%
Brownstones: 18%
Rowhomes: 3%

Large multi-unit buildings are around 55%, bungalows are 24% and brownstones/rowhomes are 21%.



There are a lot of bungalows, and they're certainly famous because they look unique and fill many neighborhoods - but a majority of the city is multi-unit large residential buildings. Those stats are from 2000, before the construction of thousands of low-rise condos and the construction of many dozens of highrise condo buildings.

Bungalows were built from 1910 to 1940 in a swath about 5-8 miles from downtown Chicago. I've been here 10 years now and have never lived in any neighborhood with bungalows. I'm not sure I've actually seen that many, but I don't make it to the northwest/southeast/south sides that often.
Exactly, and that's from 2000. Since 2000 they've built nothing but rowhomes and multi unit housing so the stats you gave were probably a bit more conservative for 2011.
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Old 07-11-2011, 10:35 AM
 
1,324 posts, read 2,129,637 times
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Yeah bungalows are more in number in Chicago's peremiter, but in either case I like Chicago's diverse housing stock; makes the city more unique, and in tune with the architectural prowess. Rowhouses are nice and all, but cmon, if that "dominates" a city, then it's homogeneous and boring.

In regards to the original point of the thread as it relates to housing, i dont think Chicago offers anything that New York cant, its just different flavors, and affordability. Does NYC have duplex downs?
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Old 07-11-2011, 12:13 PM
 
11,288 posts, read 23,420,487 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
What are the houses that fill up the area around Midway. Coming in from the air, I can see miles and miles of bungalow styled houses that look like they are 5 inches apart with driveways on one side and set back far from the street. Chicago is not a rowhouse city.
Because you're flying right through the bungalow belt where there are miles and miles of bungalows. The city is over 230 square miles. Bungalows are in an arch around 5-8 miles out from the city center. The areas around the lakefront are mostly very large multi-unit buildings and highrises. The north and northwest sides are brownstones and courtyard buildings. Areas down to the south and southeast and the northwest before you hit the bungalows are a lot of cottage houses. Rowhouses are in pockets here and there, and then larger single family homes are in the far southwest and in the northwest.

There are groups of areas with similar housing, but overall it's a very diverse array of units.

No one said Chicago was a rowhouse city, you just keep saying it's NOT. I think we're all in agreement - it's not.

Units:

Rowhouses: 40,000
Bungalows/other single family: 286,000
Brownstones/two flat/cottages: 203,000
3-flat to 12-flat/coutyard/highrise: 623,000

Last edited by Chicago60614; 07-11-2011 at 12:22 PM..
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,628,154 times
Reputation: 1323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denver111 View Post
Wouldn't that be a mark against Chicago?

The NY teams play in (arguably) the best stadium in the NFL, with direct rail to their front door.

The Bears play in the smallest, oldest venue in the NFL, with no direct rail access.
Why? We have one of the most storied stadiums in the NFL with Green Bay.

New York doesn't even have any teams in the city, that's a mark against them.
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:25 PM
 
Location: 93,020,000 miles from the sun
491 posts, read 803,259 times
Reputation: 360
Deep-dish pizza.
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Old 07-21-2011, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland - Southeast
314 posts, read 366,811 times
Reputation: 299
People from NYC are always gonna be convinced their city(and everything in it) is the best in the world while maintaining that obnoxious superiority complex. When NY didn't pick up Lebron they were saying something along the lines of "Lebron couldn't handle the strage", how ridiculous. When's the last time the Knicks won a championship? Hate to break it to you but not EVERYTHING in NYC is great.
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Old 07-21-2011, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland - Southeast
314 posts, read 366,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supermanpansy View Post
I don't want to get involved in your argument , but after eating "Chicago style hot dogs" I think it is no contest. I like a simple dog. Meat sauce, mustard, onions-bun, or sauerkraut, mustard-bun, etc. If I wanted a pickle I would buy a pickle. But if I want a hot dog-I'll stick with NY style.

Chicago style hot dogs must be an acquired taste, because I couldn't do it and I tried three times. For what it's worth, I really tried with an open mind to like them.

Let's not even go to pizza. When it comes to pizza I look at it like this. Which one could I eat over and over and on the run, etc. NY style. Because of the thickness of Deep dish, I know I would get sick of it quick. Not something you could eat a lot. Unlike regular pizza which I can't honestly say that I have ever gotten sick of. So Pizza I would give to NY too.

Chicago does better beef on weck.
This is what I don't understand about people that tour the Chicago area.. when you order a dog it is possible to order what you want on it, not everyone prefers all the condiments.

I've had Nathans before and it's not a bad dog, but there's really nothing unique about it in flavor and definately doesn't compare to vienna beef..not even in the same league.

Far as pizza goes most Chicagoans prefer the Chicago style thin crust over the deep, unfortunately cause of the tourists we're constantly stuck with the deep dish label.
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