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Old 07-14-2011, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Manhattan
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DC-Baltimore is most similar to Boston-Providence . They share some suburbs, they're close to each other, and they have solid commuting patterns from one to another, but aren't very cohesive, do not have equally sized spheres of influence, and do not really feel like they are part of the same metropolitan area.

Minneapolis-St. Paul, SF-San Jose-Oakland, Dallas-Fort Worth, and Raleigh-Durham are all cohesive and solidly feel like they are all part of the same metro.

I think Tampa-Orlando are much more separated and independent from each other than any of the other mentioned cities.
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia,New Jersey, NYC!
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Quote:
DC-Baltimore is most similar to Boston-Providence
exactly. good call
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:42 PM
 
Location: United Kingdom
432 posts, read 808,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
DC-Baltimore is most similar to Boston-Providence . They share some suburbs, they're close to each other, and they have solid commuting patterns from one to another, but aren't very cohesive, do not have equally sized spheres of influence, and do not really feel like they are part of the same metropolitan area.

Minneapolis-St. Paul, SF-San Jose-Oakland, Dallas-Fort Worth, and Raleigh-Durham are all cohesive and solidly feel like they are all part of the same metro.

I think Tampa-Orlando are much more separated and independent from each other than any of the other mentioned cities.
Think you forgot about Tampa/St. Petersburg
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Old 07-14-2011, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Cardboard box
1,909 posts, read 3,349,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
DC-Baltimore is most similar to Boston-Providence . They share some suburbs, they're close to each other, and they have solid commuting patterns from one to another, but aren't very cohesive, do not have equally sized spheres of influence, and do not really feel like they are part of the same metropolitan area.

Minneapolis-St. Paul, SF-San Jose-Oakland, Dallas-Fort Worth, and Raleigh-Durham are all cohesive and solidly feel like they are all part of the same metro.

I think Tampa-Orlando are much more separated and independent from each other than any of the other mentioned cities.

This post is spot on.
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Old 07-14-2011, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
196 posts, read 548,227 times
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Just throwing it out there--what about New York/Philadelphia?

One is an internationally recognized city, the other is nationally recognized. Both cities are powers, but one is clearly doing better than the other economically. The upscale neighborhoods of one city resemble the upscale neighborhoods of the other, and the low-income neighborhoods of each resemble each, but one city is associated with its upscale neighborhoods and the other with its low-income neighborhoods. Finally, while the cities anchor independent metros, the influence of the more powerful city is clearly felt in the other, with a small but significant portion of commuters going from one metro to the other to work.
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Old 07-15-2011, 01:27 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,899 posts, read 6,483,795 times
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Originally Posted by TheFriendlyGod View Post
Just throwing it out there--what about New York/Philadelphia?

One is an internationally recognized city, the other is nationally recognized. Both cities are powers, but one is clearly doing better than the other economically. The upscale neighborhoods of one city resemble the upscale neighborhoods of the other, and the low-income neighborhoods of each resemble each, but one city is associated with its upscale neighborhoods and the other with its low-income neighborhoods. Finally, while the cities anchor independent metros, the influence of the more powerful city is clearly felt in the other, with a small but significant portion of commuters going from one metro to the other to work.
^This sums it up perfectly. San fran/ Oakland, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Minneapolis/St. Paul are different than Baltimore and DC: separate media markets, separate airports (technically speaking), a VERY small amount of Redskins fans in the Baltimore area; way too many steelers fans. Seperate spheres of influence. They just happen to be close to each other.
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Old 07-15-2011, 02:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Washington, D.C./Baltimore = San Francisco/San Jose

This is easily the closest comparison.
Not really.

SF and San Jose share the same media market.

DC and Baltimore have seperate media markets.

Boston-Providence would be the closest to DC-Baltimore. Same CSA, different media markets.
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Old 07-15-2011, 03:35 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in the Eastern Seaboard.......
317 posts, read 490,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
DC-Baltimore is most similar to Boston-Providence . They share some suburbs, they're close to each other, and they have solid commuting patterns from one to another, but aren't very cohesive, do not have equally sized spheres of influence, and do not really feel like they are part of the same metropolitan area.
This.
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Old 07-15-2011, 10:46 AM
 
9,898 posts, read 11,729,972 times
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How do two major cities share a media market? Who's downtown do they show on the news? What area do they focus on? That would be very difficult to do with two major cities no matter how close they were.
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Old 07-15-2011, 12:15 PM
 
672 posts, read 1,578,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
How do two major cities share a media market? Who's downtown do they show on the news? What area do they focus on? That would be very difficult to do with two major cities no matter how close they were.
I guess, but SF/Oakland/San Jose does this with three major cities with ease. Pretty cool huh!

Focus wise, I would break it down like this for share of attention.
SF/Peninsula: 50%
East Bay: 25%
South Bay: 20%
North Bay: 5%


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