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View Poll Results: What is the Intellectual Capital of America?
Boston (including Cambridge) 113 49.13%
San Francisco Bay Area 45 19.57%
New York City 42 18.26%
Washington DC 30 13.04%
Voters: 230. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 08-27-2011, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,620 posts, read 12,785,952 times
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I had a feeling that this thread was going to turn into a debate over whether or not degrees denote intelligence and whether "academia" and "intellectualism" are even remotely related to one another.
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Old 08-27-2011, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,620 posts, read 12,785,952 times
Reputation: 11167
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
He's done that in the past, calling out BA people and telling them they are on ignore and then runs away--heck I hadnt even noticed until he included my name in a post he made to jman650. I found it hilarious and childish. Maybe he's just a kid in the which case I understand.

Otherwise, my armchair psychology instincts say that he actually believes that the sense of self worth of Bay Area forumers is explicitely tied to his 'approval' and by publically letting us know that HE has put us on ignore he thinks he making some grand announcement that stings us or something which is odd because in reality, being ignored by him is totally meaningless and makes no difference to anyone-like I said, I hadnt even noticed because he isnt really a forumer that whose posts I follow anyway.
Well, I dunno about you, but I've been looking for a real, objective barometer as to the overall worth of the SF Bay Area, and who could be more objective than someone who's probably never actually spent any time there to be influenced by anecdotal nonsense like the area's restaurants, bars, museums, parks, galleries, public events, and interactions with the local populace? The real accuracy lies in things like that episode of South Park that the wizened like to bring up here, or the truth that the demagogues of talk radio feel is their duty to make the populace aware of.
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Old 08-27-2011, 07:05 PM
 
816 posts, read 1,531,069 times
Reputation: 503
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
This is not even true. And even if it were, those aren't qualities that define intellectualism.

Literature, philosophy, politics, theology, poetry, law, high art and high culture are associated with intellectualism. Where these things are most dominant overall is the intellectual capital. The poll result gets it right.
I'm amazed somebody else actually gets it. These "tech" and "wealth" geeks are out of control.
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Old 08-27-2011, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
31,575 posts, read 53,103,852 times
Reputation: 14495
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Well, I dunno about you, but I've been looking for a real, objective barometer as to the overall worth of the SF Bay Area, and who could be more objective than someone who's probably never actually spent any time there to be influenced by anecdotal nonsense like the area's restaurants, bars, museums, parks, galleries, public events, and interactions with the local populace? The real accuracy lies in things like that episode of South Park that the wizened like to bring up here, or the truth that the demagogues of talk radio feel is their duty to make the populace aware of.
Yes that's it. LOL.

Anyhow, here's an interesting ranking:
Quote:

First, a few ground rules. We only ranked metropolitan areas (major cities and their suburbs) of 1 million people or more, using Census data, with the definition of each greater metropolitan area defined by Nielsen’s Designated Market Area. In a few cases, using Nielsen’s DMA definitions meant combining data from two or more Metropolitan Statistical Areas. That gave us 55 cities. All data was organized on a per-capita basis so that a resident of Nashville Tennessee, and Los Angeles, California, had equal weight.

This year’s methodology is similar to last year’s inaugural list, with a couple weighting refinements, and one major change: as our civic engagement quotient—a proxy of a city’s willingness, and ability, to invest in intellectual culture—we dropped voter turnout in favor of libraries per capita. Overall, we divided the criteria into two parts: Half for education, and half for intellectual environment. The education half encompassed the percentage of residents over age 25 who had bachelor’s degrees (25 percent weighting) and graduate degrees (25 percent), compared to the overall population over age 25. The intellectual environmental half had three subparts. First, we looked at year-to-date nonfiction book sales (16.7 percent), as tracked by Nielsen BookScan, the nation’s leading provider of accurate point-of-sale data, which tracks roughly 300,000 titles each week. We also measured the ratio of institutions of higher education (16.7 percent), as defined by the federal government—different than just measuring college degrees, this acknowledges that universities as driver of intellectual vigor of cities and rewards cities with college populations. Finally, libraries per capita (16.7 percent) measures how willing and able a city is to educate the general public, as well as the no-cost opportunities for the public to educate itself.

Once we had all these comparable, per-capita figures, we ranked the cities in each category, assigning 10 points to those near the very top, and 0 to the bottom, with scores in between dropped into a broad bell curve. We then added the totals and multiplied by two, which made for a perfect score of 200, a wash-out score of 0, and an average score right at 100—close to the exact parameters of a classic IQ test.

1 Boston 176.88
2 Hartford 159.98
3 San Francisco-San Jose 156.2
4 Raleigh-Durham 148.36
5 Denver 146.70
6 Seattle 141.69
7 Austin 140.01
8 Minneapolis 138.34
9 Washington DC 130.05
10 Rochester 126.65
11 Portland, OR 125.02
12 Kansas City 124.98
13 Salt Lake City 123.36
14 Philadelphia 123.34
15 Milwaukee 121.66
16 New York 120.02
17 Cleveland 119.99
18 San Diego 116.68
19 Columbus 116.65
20 Baltimore 115
21 Pittsburgh 114.97
22 Nashville 113.33
22 Richmond 113.33
23 Chicago 111.67
24 Indiapolis 111.67
26 Charlotte 105.01
26 Sacramento 105.01
28 Atlanta 98.35
29 Grand Rapids 98.32
30 Providence 98.32
31 Los Angeles 96.68
32 St Louis 96.65
33 Birmingham 93.32
34 Tucson 88.34
35 Norfolk 88.33
36 Cincinnati 88.30
37 Oklahoma City 86.65
38 West Palm Beach 83.33
39 Harrisburg 81.63
40 New Orleans 80
41 Dallas-Ft Worth 79.99
42 Buffalo 78.34
43 Detroit 78.33
44 Jacksonville 68.36
45 Phoenix 66.68
46 Greensboro 66.66
47 Miami 61.65
48 Louisville 59.99
49 Tampa 56.68
50 Orlando 56.66
51 Memphis 48.31
52 Houston 46.67
53 Fresno 43.29
54 San Antonio 40.00
55 Las Vegas 3.33

Smartest Cities - The Daily Beast
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Old 08-28-2011, 02:04 AM
 
3,349 posts, read 2,558,336 times
Reputation: 1699
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Yet another Bay Area booster. Bye bye.
Yet another NYC booster... yawn

NYC is not even in the same Universe here. It is Boston and The Bay area then a HUGE drop before NY... sorry, but true
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Old 08-28-2011, 02:06 AM
 
3,349 posts, read 2,558,336 times
Reputation: 1699
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
This is not even true. And even if it were, those aren't qualities that define intellectualism.

Literature, philosophy, politics, theology, poetry, law, high art and high culture are associated with intellectualism. Where these things are most dominant overall is the intellectual capital. The poll result gets it right.

Yes, but they don't take the best and brightest like the Medical field and Engineering do

Any idiot can become a lawyer... look at much of the Democrat party
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Old 08-28-2011, 04:19 AM
 
27,732 posts, read 24,748,456 times
Reputation: 16450
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&M_Indie_08 View Post
Any idiot can become a lawyer... look at much of the Democrat party
Or the Tea Party. Wait, do they even believe in education? Anti-science, get historical facts wrong, etc.
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Old 08-28-2011, 06:26 AM
 
5,310 posts, read 6,610,573 times
Reputation: 2649
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
But paying $600/sq ft to live in a city that has world-class libraries and a large intellectual community drawn to an economy that revolves around the sciences, medicine, and engineering, and the amenities and resources that it brings is a no-brainer to many very intelligent people.

Just sayin'.

And exactly what city is this? SF sure doesn't have much opportunity for mechanical engineers.
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Old 08-28-2011, 06:30 AM
 
5,310 posts, read 6,610,573 times
Reputation: 2649
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallstreetmafia View Post
Class envy is a bit 2009, no? You may be content living a life of mediocrity/poverty but striving for more doesn't make one a sociopath.

All college degrees aren't created equal. Look at the "triangle" or whatever it's called in North Carolina. So many college degrees yet ironically no industry, no wealth. Seattle, so many college degrees but such a laughably small amount of wealth. Boulder? Is there a single person in that town with a high net worth? Are you following along? Being degree rich and void of any wealth makes a region very dumb.

Point is, anyone can get log online and get a "college degree", there is nothing special about that. You need to look for the bastion of graduates from ivy/top schools, the industry (which top companies are located where), and the levels of wealth to come to this conclusion.

There is nothing intelligent in being "college educated" and poor. In reality it makes you very dumb for the lost time/opportunity cost of attaining a virtually worthless piece of paper. If being graduating from a worthless state college/university of Phoenix makes you feel intelligent then more power to you.

The answer to this poll is New York. Bay Area too.


You are even dumber if you went to one of those high-priced colleges to get a worthless piece of paper.
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Old 08-28-2011, 08:11 AM
 
5,805 posts, read 8,317,186 times
Reputation: 3051
Another useless thread where no one can produce any hard factual data pertaining to the subject.

Just another - NYC, SF, Philly, DC, Chicago, Boston Cheerleaders Fight Feast of "My City is better than XZY city"....
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