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View Poll Results: Atlanta or New Orleans...which is hipper/edgier?
Atlanta 29 37.66%
New Orleans 48 62.34%
Voters: 77. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 10-08-2011, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
965 posts, read 1,162,178 times
Reputation: 1150

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
You know I been asking posters definition of the terms edge, hip and etc even quirky the whole time.
I'll throw out my definitions.

Edgy, hip - You are creative, and you are flying blind. You are NOT emulating whatever the mainstream is, or whatever is trendy. You are guided by your own vision, even if it means that it opens you up to ridicule or people who don't get it. You're committed anyway, and whatever it is that you do, you get better and better at it, and if you get popular or the mainstream moves to meet you, then fine, but you aren't - say - moving to another city and shaving off your rough edges because Arista Records just called.

An example: back in the late 70s, The Ramones (a punk band) toured as the opening act for Boston (a perfectionistic, very mainstream classic rock band with two platinum albums). The Ramones were all but booed off stages - they had people throwing things at them. 35 years later, who ended up being more influential? The Ramones. Rock today could give a rat's a** about Boston.

Quirky is to edge what new wave was to punk. Quirky is more self-conscious, deliberate and trendy, and less spontaneous. Rather than doing something creatively wild, you're thinking about the best way to look like you're creatively wild while still making sure that you get a lot of attention.

When I hear 'hip,' the first things I think of are Greenwich Village in the early-to-mid 1970s (which spawned The New York Dolls, Talking Heads, Television, Blondie, The Ramones, Richard Hell, et. al.), or South Bronx in the late 70s (the underground birth of hip hop), or the multiracial hardcore punk scene around Fugazi and Bad Brains in Washington DC in the 80s (or the go-go dance scene that was happening in DC at the same time). Or Athens, Georgia 1976-1985, when The B52s, REM, Pylon, The Method Actors, Love Tractor and dozens and dozens of other bands sprang up. The sounded like NOTHING else at the time; conceivably the chances of their mainstream success was about zero. They got no deals, so they put their own records out, did things completely their way, toured CHEAP until it hurt, and before long some of those bands began to amass a large audience - they didn't move to the mainstream. The mainstream moved to them.

Now none of the above is specifically directed at either NoLA or ATL, but I don't know if either city really has a wave of true underground creativity that has the potential to blow people away like some of the examples above. If it sounds too much like something else, it's not edge to me. I'm in my 40s, but edgy is the first time I listened to Grandmaster Flash or Sonic Youth in the early 80s, when I was 12-13 years old and my reaction was something like "What the %^&* is this, and I gotta know more about these people." NOTHING sounded like that, it was done very well, and that's what made it extremely fresh. That's why watching hip-hop and punk gradually become more mainstream during the 1980s and especially the 1990s made it exciting to be into music then, and that's what I still look for (and I'll say that while there's both punk and hip hop undergrounds with a lot of cool stuff happening, it's pretty word-of-mouth, and most of the hip hop and punk stuff hyped and coming out now is a lot more contrived - designed to sell, designed for BET or MTV, and not as any kind of actual outlet for fresh, new ideas). For me to take it seriously as something interesting, it's gotta really be brave enough to go out on a limb.

Maybe it's floating around NoLA or ATL, but I dunno.
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Old 10-08-2011, 10:57 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,750,536 times
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As great a city as Atlanta is, not much there has ever struck me as being incredibly innovative or, well...edgy. Even in the quirkiest of quirky neighborhoods, there's a bit of a McHispter element to be found. Not much of the bold and truly strange, almost eerie quirkiness that I had previously seen in cities like Houston, Austin, or DC. That's just me, though.
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:12 AM
 
2,251 posts, read 1,896,181 times
Reputation: 1167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
And again, you're looking at it through a very superficial lens. It's not all about blowing up or making it big. I don't care if Atlanta has all of the famous musicians in the world, because that doesn't make it more hip or edgy.

You keep saying that New Orleans is not up to par with Atlanta's music industry, but no one here has said otherwise. No one has even hinted at that fact. Even if most NO artists were moving away from their city (which I guarantee you isn't true), those who do are not going straight to Atlanta. New Orleans musicians can be found all over the globe, and musicians from around the globe can be found in New Orleans.
And Again your still missing what I'm saying, it's not about who become famous, people come who believe at least there's a opportunity to be. Again the industry brings creative people there opportunity whether or not they're successful is another story. Again other wise the underground comes to Atlanta to become the main stream. What that leave is a pool of creative people. where there is success, leaves a even larger crowd of people trying to reach success. Most artist go through a underground phase first.

What I mention was Atlanta was a underdog in the 90s, no one excepted after 2000 the city name will be as known as it is today in music. Atlanta was southern and southern was not mainstream the bankhead bounce, freaknik days the term dirty south came from a song of a Atlanta underground artist name Cool breeze in the 90s but after 2000 even the silliest artist has a shot which is a bad thing but..... aways. What I'm trying to get you to look at how something underground can become a grass movement into something larger.

And Again I'm saying New Orleans is not up to par in current music you keep straw maning me as "music industry" I'm saying New Orleans is not up to par in more current music. New Orleans is know for older forms of music. But as far as soul, R&B, rock, hiphop and etc to Atlanta really? You keep talking New Orleans musicians what jazz? current musical artist move to other cities. And I never said they move to just Atlanta LOL now I never even hint that. I saying New Orleans is a move a way city, Atlanta is a move to city as far as current music. This isn't the hay day of jazz I'm talking about younger forms of music.

Last edited by chiatldal; 10-09-2011 at 01:28 AM..
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Old 10-09-2011, 09:01 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,750,536 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
And Again your still missing what I'm saying, it's not about who become famous, people come who believe at least there's a opportunity to be. Again the industry brings creative people there opportunity whether or not they're successful is another story. Again other wise the underground comes to Atlanta to become the main stream. What that leave is a pool of creative people. where there is success, leaves a even larger crowd of people trying to reach success. Most artist go through a underground phase first.

What I mention was Atlanta was a underdog in the 90s, no one excepted after 2000 the city name will be as known as it is today in music. Atlanta was southern and southern was not mainstream the bankhead bounce, freaknik days the term dirty south came from a song of a Atlanta underground artist name Cool breeze in the 90s but after 2000 even the silliest artist has a shot which is a bad thing but..... aways. What I'm trying to get you to look at how something underground can become a grass movement into something larger.

And Again I'm saying New Orleans is not up to par in current music you keep straw maning me as "music industry" I'm saying New Orleans is not up to par in more current music. New Orleans is know for older forms of music. But as far as soul, R&B, rock, hiphop and etc to Atlanta really? You keep talking New Orleans musicians what jazz? current musical artist move to other cities. And I never said they move to just Atlanta LOL now I never even hint that. I saying New Orleans is a move a way city, Atlanta is a move to city as far as current music. This isn't the hay day of jazz I'm talking about younger forms of music.
I told you knew nothing about New Orleans. It's not just about jazz or older forms of music. There are numerous R&B, soul, and rock musicians in New Orleans, but they're mostly underground. The difference is that Atlanta has a mainstream industry to support its artists and make them more well known, but that doesn't make it a more musical city than New Orleans.

Jazz is TIMELESS, and don't forget it. Even the younger generations of people who are aware of QUALITY music are fans of jazz, and even some "current" popular musicians incorporate it into their music: Jill Scott, Alicia Keys, Common, Anthony Hamilton, etc.

I almost forgot about the Essence Music Festival being held in New Orleans every year (except for 2006 when it was held in Houston).
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Old 10-09-2011, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
11,001 posts, read 8,865,413 times
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Up to par? Haha
As if current music isn't on the radio.
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Old 10-09-2011, 09:21 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,750,536 times
Reputation: 4853
New Orleans artists:









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Old 10-09-2011, 11:02 AM
 
Location: The big blue yonder...
1,816 posts, read 1,558,126 times
Reputation: 795
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Atlanta is a far larger city than New Orleans with a huge industry to support its hip-hop scene.
I haven't read all the post yet, so forgive me if I've missed something. I just have to address something real quick...

Nairobi... I have to ask, what is it that you know of Atlanta's scene? Because you continue to point at "industry" almost implying that it Atlanta is just that... Mainstream only...

I know 1st hand of Atlanta & New Orleans' hip hop scenes... Both have underground scenes... Atlanta's scene is SO MUCH stronger and more vast that New Orleans has ever been. Atlanta's underground scene is what brought the attention of mainstream artists looking to find new talent. Talent does not just come there looking to land a record contract. They come there to sharpen & hone their skills. In the same fashion as artists once did in Los Angeles' Leimert Park scene back in the early 90s. That was true hip hop going on... It happens in Atlanta and you have already shown that you have no idea of what's going on. You think it's what you see on TV & BET, not knowing it runs so much deeper than that.

Ever heard of A3C? That's real hip hop going on... From artists like Big Daddy Kane to new unheard of underground artists like Soul Khan & Bronze Nazareth, Arablak & so on... Again, RIGHT NOW, in 2011, Atlanta is on the cutting edge of the music world... From underground to the industry. In BOTH. That poster that posted a few videos of New Orleans' artists isn't holding a match to the torch of artists that Atlanta (from Atlanta or influenced BY Atlanta) is pumping...

This isn't to discredit New Orleans' scene, but you're acting like "how dare someone say that superficial city that Atlanta is, is more edgy than the great New Orleans..." Come down a little and realize that more is going on in Atlanta. New Orleans comes to Atlanta to take part in "the edge." Not the other way around (RIGHT NOW). Maybe before, maybe some year later, but not in 2011...
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Old 10-09-2011, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
11,001 posts, read 8,865,413 times
Reputation: 5247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Psykomonkee View Post
I haven't read all the post yet, so forgive me if I've missed something. I just have to address something real quick...

Nairobi... I have to ask, what is it that you know of Atlanta's scene? Because you continue to point at "industry" almost implying that it Atlanta is just that... Mainstream only...

I know 1st hand of Atlanta & New Orleans' hip hop scenes... Both have underground scenes... Atlanta's scene is SO MUCH stronger and more vast that New Orleans has ever been. Atlanta's underground scene is what brought the attention of mainstream artists looking to find new talent. Talent does not just come there looking to land a record contract. They come there to sharpen & hone their skills. In the same fashion as artists once did in Los Angeles' Leimert Park scene back in the early 90s. That was true hip hop going on... It happens in Atlanta and you have already shown that you have no idea of what's going on. You think it's what you see on TV & BET, not knowing it runs so much deeper than that.

Ever heard of A3C? That's real hip hop going on... From artists like Big Daddy Kane to new unheard of underground artists like Soul Khan & Bronze Nazareth, Arablak & so on... Again, RIGHT NOW, in 2011, Atlanta is on the cutting edge of the music world... From underground to the industry. In BOTH. That poster that posted a few videos of New Orleans' artists isn't holding a match to the torch of artists that Atlanta (from Atlanta or influenced BY Atlanta) is pumping...

This isn't to discredit New Orleans' scene, but you're acting like "how dare someone say that superficial city that Atlanta is, is more edgy than the great New Orleans..." Come down a little and realize that more is going on in Atlanta. New Orleans comes to Atlanta to take part in "the edge." Not the other way around (RIGHT NOW). Maybe before, maybe some year later, but not in 2011...
Can I ask you-what does the music scene do for edgy?
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Old 10-09-2011, 11:09 AM
 
Location: The big blue yonder...
1,816 posts, read 1,558,126 times
Reputation: 795
I'm also trying to figure out when had I ever mentioned Little 5 Points... I never credited L5P for Atlanta being more edgy than NOLA.

Yet, I'm receiving messages saying how "overrated" L5P is and that it's not a "real" urban neighborhood like you'd find in Brooklyn, DC & so on... Okay...???? What does that have to do with the question at hand, and why am I getting messages about that... I don't care about L5P. I live in DC...
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Old 10-09-2011, 11:10 AM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,750,536 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Psykomonkee View Post
I haven't read all the post yet, so forgive me if I've missed something. I just have to address something real quick...

Nairobi... I have to ask, what is it that you know of Atlanta's scene? Because you continue to point at "industry" almost implying that it Atlanta is just that... Mainstream only...

I know 1st hand of Atlanta & New Orleans' hip hop scenes... Both have underground scenes... Atlanta's scene is SO MUCH stronger and more vast that New Orleans has ever been. Atlanta's underground scene is what brought the attention of mainstream artists looking to find new talent. Talent does not just come there looking to land a record contract. They come there to sharpen & hone their skills. In the same fashion as artists once did in Los Angeles' Leimert Park scene back in the early 90s. That was true hip hop going on... It happens in Atlanta and you have already shown that you have no idea of what's going on. You think it's what you see on TV & BET, not knowing it runs so much deeper than that.

Ever heard of A3C? That's real hip hop going on... From artists like Big Daddy Kane to new unheard of underground artists like Soul Khan & Bronze Nazareth, Arablak & so on... Again, RIGHT NOW, in 2011, Atlanta is on the cutting edge of the music world... From underground to the industry. In BOTH. That poster that posted a few videos of New Orleans' artists isn't holding a match to the torch of artists that Atlanta (from Atlanta or influenced BY Atlanta) is pumping...

This isn't to discredit New Orleans' scene, but you're acting like "how dare someone say that superficial city that Atlanta is, is more edgy than the great New Orleans..." Come down a little and realize that more is going on in Atlanta. New Orleans comes to Atlanta to take part in "the edge." Not the other way around (RIGHT NOW). Maybe before, maybe some year later, but not in 2011...
Not at all what I'm saying. I am familiar with Atlanta's underground scene, but as I just explained to the other guy, it's the industry that is able to support Atlanta's music scene, underground or otherwise. New Orleans is far far smaller and lacks that industry, so of course its music scene won't be as vast as Atlanta's. But again, that doesn't make Atlanta any more of a music city than NO is.

I can't make my point any more clear than that, so if you don't understand it then I don't know what else to say. To echo annie_himself, how exactly does this relate to a city being edgy?
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