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View Poll Results: Which state has more people that identify with southern culture?
VA 48 36.64%
TX 72 54.96%
FL 11 8.40%
Voters: 131. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-23-2011, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
The survey still indicates that more Texans identify as 'Southerners' than Virginians. Catholicism is not incompatible with being Southern. South Louisiana and San Antonio are still fairly solidly southern.
Catholicism has very much to do with it. Historically; the south has been dominated by baptist. Remember; we're speaking about the south in a stereotypical sense. If San Antonio is southern; than NOVA is southern.
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Old 10-23-2011, 11:02 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blkgiraffe View Post
Catholicism has very much to do with it. Historically; the south has been dominated by baptist. Remember; we're speaking about the south in a stereotypical sense. If San Antonio is southern; than NOVA is southern.
I thought the OP's question was pretty straight-forward...another poster gave the closest thing to a definitive answer by providing a survey.

Catholics cannot be excluded from being southern. Catholics have been from the South since it's earliest days. Whether they be of French, Spanish/Mexican, German, Irish or even Anglo-Catholic origin.

What is 'stereotypical' southern? Plantations, sweet tea, antebellum mansions? The area defined as the 'South' has expanded since the days of the Civil War to include areas like the highlands of Kentucky and the prairie country of Texas. There are many Hispanics in Texas who proudly identify as Southerners and speak with Southern accents.
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Old 10-23-2011, 12:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I thought the OP's question was pretty straight-forward...another poster gave the closest thing to a definitive answer by providing a survey.

.
Yes that is what I was talking about. The south is diverse in terms of different versions of what Southern is, so are other regions, but some people in those states don't identify with southern culture or consider their areas the south.
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Old 10-23-2011, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,988 posts, read 33,855,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I thought the OP's question was pretty straight-forward...another poster gave the closest thing to a definitive answer by providing a survey.

Catholics cannot be excluded from being southern. Catholics have been from the South since it's earliest days. Whether they be of French, Spanish/Mexican, German, Irish or even Anglo-Catholic origin.

What is 'stereotypical' southern? Plantations, sweet tea, antebellum mansions? The area defined as the 'South' has expanded since the days of the Civil War to include areas like the highlands of Kentucky and the prairie country of Texas. There are many Hispanics in Texas who proudly identify as Southerners and speak with Southern accents.
If that's the case; than Texas shouldn't have so many votes considering parts of the states were never southern historically nor culturally. Virginia and Florida have always been southern; entirely. You're right, but the majority of the catholic population in Texas is within the Mexican community.
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Old 10-23-2011, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Baptist is starting to decrease in Texas and Catholicism and Non Denomination churches are increasing. Only East Texas may still stay solidy Baptist in the future.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
The survey still indicates that more Texans identify as 'Southerners' than Virginians. Catholicism is not incompatible with being Southern. South Louisiana and San Antonio are still fairly solidly southern.
San Antonio is not solidly Southern any longer and there are not many Hispanics with Southern accents. Have you ever been to Texas?.
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Old 10-23-2011, 12:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blkgiraffe View Post
Catholicism has very much to do with it. Historically; the south has been dominated by baptist. Remember; we're speaking about the south in a stereotypical sense. If San Antonio is southern; than NOVA is southern.
To preface? As always, so many interesting comments/observations by those who obviously have an interest in Southern history/culture, and self-identify as Southerners.

So to put in my two worthless cents on this aspect, well, it has to be remembered that the phenomenon of Catholism being a "major" force in Texas is nothing historically like it in the true Southwest (i.e New Mexico and Arizona). And, in the same general point regard, not even in any states outside the South

That is to say, the major settlement force and influences on Texas were a white/black duality of a generally fundamentalist "Bible Belt" Protestant variety not much different than that anywhere else in the South. Up until comparatively recently, the Catholic church membership was never all that much in Texas and it is confined, very much, to the hispanic population and of non-Southern transplants. This, as compared to other parts of the country where the Catholic church is the major one of white natives.

Now, ok, I realize that there are many, many, Tejanos who rightfully consider themselves every bit a "Texan" as any anglo or African-American native. So let me interject that I hope this will not become a play of the "race-car."

No, what I mean is, and this is just personal experience and IMHO, that hispanic Texans (legal or not), do not, as a general rule, feel any Southern identity...and?...to take it further? A noteable percentage really don't feel all that much "Texas" identity either. Perhaps because Texas IS essentially a Southern state and so much of the history and culture is at odds with their own ancestry and heritage...?

San Antonio? It's very name is totally conjures up images of Mexico and the desert Southwest and adobe houses and all. And there IS something to it for sure. However, at the same time, San Antonio is full of Southern (and I mean CLASSIC Southern) history and culture. After the Texas Revolution, the Mexican population pretty much left that area and went either back to the old country or to far South Texas.

So who was left -- and ever flooding in to do so -- to build the city? It was white and black Southerners...and it is not hard at all to get off the beaten path in "Old San Antone" to see the Old South foundation of it.

I think I need a beer!
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Old 10-23-2011, 01:03 PM
 
10,238 posts, read 18,862,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Baptist is starting to decrease in Texas and Catholicism and Non Denomination churches are increasing. Only East Texas may still stay solidy Baptist in the future.

San Antonio is not solidly Southern any longer and there are not many Hispanics with Southern accents. Have you ever been to Texas?.
But I think the real point, Spade, is that there is a solid historical/cultural point to be made that the Catholic church membership is not of the same type/variety of that in the true SW and in other areas of the country where it is dominant. As a general rule, most native white and black Texans are still solidly protestant and of the Southern variety.
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Old 10-23-2011, 09:55 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by Garfieldian View Post
Yes that is what I was talking about. The south is diverse in terms of different versions of what Southern is, so are other regions, but some people in those states don't identify with southern culture or consider their areas the south.
Exactly.
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Old 10-23-2011, 09:57 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blkgiraffe View Post
If that's the case; than Texas shouldn't have so many votes considering parts of the states were never southern historically nor culturally. Virginia and Florida have always been southern; entirely. You're right, but the majority of the catholic population in Texas is within the Mexican community.
I should have also said what is 'stereotypically southern' is changing now. From my travels throughout the south Texas is every bit as Southern as Virginia, acre for acre.
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Old 10-23-2011, 10:00 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 53,220,446 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Baptist is starting to decrease in Texas and Catholicism and Non Denomination churches are increasing. Only East Texas may still stay solidy Baptist in the future.



San Antonio is not solidly Southern any longer and there are not many Hispanics with Southern accents. Have you ever been to Texas?.
East Texas and maybe the far northwest/panhandle, which along with Eastern New Mexico is a bastion of Baptists.

I met a couple working at convenience stores throughout Texas (I've been across the state, albeit I did only spend a few days there). There are many Hispanics who have lived all throughout Texas for generations who have totally integrated into American society. They're not all recent 'immigrants'. Of course that's not even speaking of the many Hispanics who have lived in Texas long before the others. I'm sure there are PLENTY of Hispanics with southern accents. Hispanics who do not live in Latino enclaves tend to integrate even moreso than say Blacks and Blacks in the South all have Southern accents.
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