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Old 10-18-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Boston and DC are the inverse of each other when it comes to diversity. Boston has largely homogeneous suburbs and a very diverse core. DC has diverse suburbs and a largely homogeneous core. Do you think these facts have any bearing on the way the average resident in both of these metro areas experience diversity?
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Old 10-18-2011, 04:47 PM
 
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I think it does.

As just about every metro area in the country has most of its population in the suburbs. (Name one metro area where AT LEAST half the population doesn't live in the suburbs) it does have an effect on how the metro areas residents experience diversity.

And the conclusion, at least in my opinion, is that diverse suburbs are more important in terms of bringing different ideas/different perspectives than the core.

Diversity in a central cities core is relfective of either urban ethnic enclaves where immigrants haven't been integrated into the fabric of the mainstream, as well as neighborhoods that attract young professionals and artists who are there to experience the culture and excitement of the core and tend to be transient. This also naturally lends itself to segregation.

Diverse suburbs on the the other hand, IMO, are MUCH more important in the overall diversity of the metro area.
First: you have the sheer numbers of suburban residents.
Second: Suburbs are where you raise kids. And when the KIDS grow up and are raised in that diverse environment they grow up used to and thriving on diversity. And that leads to integration and being comfortable around people different from you.


So, I absolutely think diverse suburbs and homogenous core is overall more cosmopolitan than a diverse core and homogenous suburbs.
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Old 10-18-2011, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,650 posts, read 24,911,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
I think it does.

As just about every metro area in the country has most of its population in the suburbs. (Name one metro area where AT LEAST half the population doesn't live in the suburbs) it does have an effect on how the metro areas residents experience diversity.

And the conclusion, at least in my opinion, is that diverse suburbs are more important in terms of bringing different ideas/different perspectives than the core.

Diversity in a central cities core is relfective of either urban ethnic enclaves where immigrants haven't been integrated into the fabric of the mainstream, as well as neighborhoods that attract young professionals and artists who are there to experience the culture and excitement of the core and tend to be transient. This also naturally lends itself to segregation.

Diverse suburbs on the the other hand, IMO, are MUCH more important in the overall diversity of the metro area.
First: you have the sheer numbers of suburban residents.
Second: Suburbs are where you raise kids. And when the KIDS grow up and are raised in that diverse environment they grow up used to and thriving on diversity. And that leads to integration and being comfortable around people different from you.


So, I absolutely think diverse suburbs and homogenous core is overall more cosmopolitan than a diverse core and homogenous suburbs.
Interesting points. Though I think suburbs can be just as segregated, if not more, than central cities. Many suburbs were created precisely because wealthier people (who tend to be white) did not want to share their tax dollars with less affluent people (who tend to be of races other than white). And suburbs can be equally divided purely along racial lines as well.

I would think that the city would give people more opportunities to experience diversity. People are closer together, public transportation is more accessible (and used more), and most cities (in the Northeast anyway) have a single school district.
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Old 10-18-2011, 07:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Interesting points. Though I think suburbs can be just as segregated, if not more, than central cities. Many suburbs were created precisely because wealthier people (who tend to be white) did not want to share their tax dollars with less affluent people (who tend to be of races other than white). And suburbs can be equally divided purely along racial lines as well.

I would think that the city would give people more opportunities to experience diversity. People are closer together, public transportation is more accessible (and used more), and most cities (in the Northeast anyway) have a single school district.
Agreed.

How do diverse suburbs help if most people just run into the house as soon as they get home? It's not like they talk to their neighbors or anything.

In cities, people are forced to interact. In the suburbs, you can be isolated as much as possible. How often do people come home in the suburb and literally run from their car into their house without saying hi to anyone?

Cities, especially super diverse ones like Chicago and NYC, force people to interact with each other, especially at the core.
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Old 10-18-2011, 07:29 PM
 
8,671 posts, read 8,832,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philynyallday View Post
Agreed.

How do diverse suburbs help if most people just run into the house as soon as they get home? It's not like they talk to their neighbors or anything.

In cities, people are forced to interact. In the suburbs, you can be isolated as much as possible. How often do people come home in the suburb and literally run from their car into their house without saying hi to anyone?

Cities, especially super diverse ones like Chicago and NYC, force people to interact with each other, especially at the core.
LOL, i grew up in a suburb and knew Everyone in a 3 block radii.
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Old 10-18-2011, 07:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
LOL, i grew up in a suburb and knew Everyone in a 3 block radii.
Yeah but that isn't the norm..more like the exception. In the city, by definition since it's much denser, it's a LOT harder to be isolated except for the craziest people.

There is a reason why people have fences around their homes in the suburbs..to keep other people out and for privacy.
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Old 10-18-2011, 07:41 PM
 
8,671 posts, read 8,832,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philynyallday View Post
Yeah but that isn't the norm..more like the exception. In the city, by definition since it's much denser, it's a LOT harder to be isolated except for the craziest people.

There is a reason why people have fences around their homes in the suburbs..to keep other people out and for privacy.
or keep in a dog
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Old 10-18-2011, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,363,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philynyallday View Post
Agreed.

How do diverse suburbs help if most people just run into the house as soon as they get home? It's not like they talk to their neighbors or anything.

In cities, people are forced to interact. In the suburbs, you can be isolated as much as possible. How often do people come home in the suburb and literally run from their car into their house without saying hi to anyone?

Cities, especially super diverse ones like Chicago and NYC, force people to interact with each other, especially at the core.
That's a sweeping generalization.

It hasnt been the case for me. I know my neighbors much, much better in my suburban Dallas home than I did living in central Chicago in a high rise.
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Old 10-18-2011, 10:01 PM
 
9,596 posts, read 10,956,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Boston and DC are the inverse of each other when it comes to diversity. Boston has largely homogeneous suburbs and a very diverse core. DC has diverse suburbs and a largely homogeneous core. Do you think these facts have any bearing on the way the average resident in both of these metro areas experience diversity?
So are you from Boston? We had a conversation about diversity and Caribbean population in D.C. and Boston and I assumed you were from Boston.
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Old 10-19-2011, 12:06 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,336,263 times
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With a few exceptions, if the suburbs are diverse the urban core is probably going to be diverse. The only exceptions I can think of are some cities in the Midwest and Northeast like Detroit or D.C. where the city is majority black. Areas where property values are high in the inner city, such as Boston or Manhattan, will probably have more whites than cities with less prestigious inner city precincts/downtown areas.
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