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Old 08-21-2008, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Boston
1,125 posts, read 4,095,494 times
Reputation: 492

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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
The modern south isn't like that, and I don't even know if Texas qualifies as the "south", since it's more southwest. There are still some throwbacks to an earlier time left in rural areas, but they are becoming much more rare around cities and their suburban areas. Being redneck isn't limited to the south though...there are plenty of northern rednecks as well. Ever been to Montana, Idaho, Maine, upstate NY, western PA?
yes frequent maine (they are called mainiacs) and upstate ny (my bf is from there) and have been to western PA.
I definately understand that these "redneck" issues and comments are usually pocketed to very rural areas of the country and major cities/burbs are much more progressive and intune with the rest of the country. I'm sorry if my comment didn't come across that way, it was just an experience of someone using an old term in a negative/deragatory way
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Old 08-21-2008, 11:12 AM
 
208 posts, read 539,429 times
Reputation: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by nate14ri View Post
Back when I was in high school in Rhode Island (this was about 2002) I attending a High School diplomacy forum in DC. Right when I got on the bus to go to the conference i sat down next to a rural texan guy (hats, boots, drawl and all) attending the same forum and he told me to quote "Get lost you f'ing yankee". Needless to say, I was a bit taken off guard. Turned out the guy actually road a horse to school regularly.
Anyways I was in complete shock that southerners are still stuck in confederate times.....gave new meaning on why I enjoy being a notherner.
So based on that one encounter, all southerners must be living in the past? I've had rude encounters up north based on where I was from (TN), but I don't form my opinions about a place based on an ignorant comment from someone I don't even know.
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Old 08-21-2008, 04:12 PM
 
835 posts, read 2,080,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous View Post
Loosely, it can refer to anyone who is less southern than you. A lot of South Carolinians think of North Carolinians as Yankees. I've been called a Yankee by a Mississippian. Or if you don't drink sweet tea or eat grits, you might qualify as a Yankee. This is usually meant as a joke.
I know this is an old post but...

I think the North Carolinians being referred to as Yankees by South Carolinians is somewhat of a joke.

A Mississippian called a South Carolinian a Yankee??? Now that's a new one.
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Old 08-21-2008, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Penobscot Bay, the best place in Maine!
1,893 posts, read 5,256,037 times
Reputation: 2650
Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and some parts of Massachusetts.
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Old 08-21-2008, 05:22 PM
 
6,868 posts, read 6,945,906 times
Reputation: 5733
Default Reason for Obsession w/Yankees

Quote:
Originally Posted by tahiti View Post
you and me both, and i've been around the block once or twice . these divisive posts lately about north -vs- south are strange (or, shall I say, the responses), and smacks of some folks having an inferiority complex. as i like to say "the only way some people feel good about where they are is to put the other guy down".
Actually, I think the reason the word "Yankee" keeps coming up on here is that lots of northeasterners are moving to the south. Many people in the south are shocked by this and feel invaded. I'm not saying that's necessarily right, but that's how they feel. We have to allow them their feelings, just as all of you sympathize with the American Indians and how they felt when the "white man" invaded their territories. People, like a lot of animals, are territorial.

To me NY, NJ, PA, NH, RI, MA, DE, CT, VT, and ME are the Yankee states (Northeastern). MI, WI, MN, etc. are "Upper Midwest." I don't think Southerners feel "inferior" at all. They like the way they are. They just don't like to be made fun of, as any human being would perceive a slight, especially if someone from the north had moved into their "territory."

I live in the south, but I lived in Miami & Ft. Lauderdale for 12 years and experienced life among the "Yankees," mostly NY & NJ transplants & snowbirds."
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Old 08-21-2008, 05:47 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,829,143 times
Reputation: 23216
I did a whole post and did not once mention that to a Southerner, a Yankee is someone who feels themselves superior to Southerners and looks on a person as inferior just because they have a Southern accent. So once again I will state that being a Yankee is a state of mind rather than a state.

It is possible for one to be from New York, New Jersey, or Pennsylvania and not be a Yankee if you are not as rude as a lot of people who come from those states. I have lots of friends from all states, but it takes about five minutes for me to decide that I will no longer associate with someone that starts putting down the South. As a matter of fact, I really don't like people who make fun of anyone because of their social differences. It is just a different culture and that is what makes us all interesting to each other.

I especially like those people from the New England states. They have a lot in common with the independent attitude of the Southern mountain people. Life was not easy for most people in either place, so it caused the people there to develop a lot of character. Yankee is not a very complimentary term, so I don't usually us it outside my home.

BTW, I don't drink any kind of tea, nor do I eat grits, or okra; but I am definitely Southern and proud of it.

Last edited by NCN; 08-21-2008 at 05:59 PM..
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Old 08-21-2008, 05:56 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,383 posts, read 15,301,300 times
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I consider DE and MD northern states, but not Yankee. To Me, Ive always thought of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania as Yankee
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Old 08-21-2008, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,846 posts, read 14,854,993 times
Reputation: 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
a Yankee is someone who feels themselves superior to Southerners and looks on a person as inferior just because they have a Southern accent. So once again I will state that being a Yankee is a state of mind rather than a state.
You have created your own definition here and it bears no resemblence to anything I've ever heard. Originally, a "Yankee" was a New Englander and during the Civil War, it became a derogatory term used by the Confederates to describe the union soldiers, many of whom were from New England.

Later, "Yankee" became a term used by foreigners to describe an American, usually in a derogatory manner, such as "Yankee go home". It's still used by some southerners as a derogatory term, and in some cases to describe people who are not Yankees in the true sense. People in the south call anyone who comes from outside the south a Yankee. Someone from California or Minnesota is not a Yankee in the old sense of word.

It never was about people looking down on the south. If anything, it was about southerners having a chip on their shoulders, and especially after the civil war and the civil rights movements, blaming northerners for their own perceived misfortunes and holding a grudge.
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Old 08-21-2008, 07:48 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,880,731 times
Reputation: 660
I consider states that are Yankee to be all the states that fought for the Union plus Missouri, West Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware. Missouri supported the Union overwhelmingly more than the Confederacy during the Civil War, and continued to do so after the Civil War...it gained in its major cities in black population during the Great Migration, most of the state doesn't speak with a Southern accent or heavily favor Southern culture...its agriculture is Midwestern, as is for the most part its weather...Missouri is the Southern Midwest. Antebellum Missouri was heavily divided, but after the civil war states like Missouri, Maryland, and Delaware took on a definitively "yankee" stance.
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Old 08-21-2008, 07:50 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,880,731 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scraper Enthusiast View Post
The South, culturally speaking, (best judged by accent), is:

Georgia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Alabama
Mississippi
Arkansas
Louisiana
Texas (all except far west Texas near El Paso, and far south Texas around the Rio Grande Valley), and perhaps the far northern panhandle north of Amarillo.
Oklahoma (a majority, perhaps omitting the panhandle and some areas of north central and northeast Oklahoma)
Tennessee
Virginia (far northern Virginia is a mix)
Southern Illinois (really only very far south Illinois, places south of the I-24/I-57 junction)
Southern Indiana (really only areas near the Ohio River)
Southern Missouri (the boothill and areas roughly south of Springfield and Cape Girardeau)
Maryland (namely the southern tidewater and coastal areas of the Delmarva)
Kentucky (only far northern areas near Cincinnati are mixed).
Florida (most of the state north of Orlando, throughout the central core south to the Everglades) Mixed along the I-4 corridor, the I-95 corridor south of Daytona Beach, and the I-75 corridor south of Tampa, but mainly west of the interstate (toward the beach). The Keys seem more southern than Miami, in my opinion.
My friend, you hit the nail on the head!!! I could not have put the boundaries in better locations, you clearly have been around like me (to 40 plus states). My experiences coincide EXACTLY with your definition of the South.
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