U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-24-2010, 11:05 AM
eek
 
Location: Queens, NY
3,576 posts, read 6,467,773 times
Reputation: 1419

Advertisements

my take:

YouTube - my take on the word 'yankee' being used in 2010
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-24-2010, 11:18 AM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,171,794 times
Reputation: 2090
Quote:
Originally Posted by skinem View Post
It isn't only southerners that divide this country into two parts.

I grew up out west. Most folks in my area kind of thought in east/west terms, not north/south. Of course, "back east" covered basically anything east of the Rockies... Not saying it's accurate or right, but it is the way it is with a lot of folks in how they view the country.

And to those who are so vitriolic and horrified that someone dare use the term "yankee", lighten up. If that works you up I fear you may have a stroke over something that is truly offensive. Take a breath and breathe and it'll be all right. Ask yourself why it tears you up so much any way. My Canadian friends call me that (you know, the "y-word") sometimes. I manage to refrain from punching them, raising my blood pressure, or getting my undies in a bunch.

To those who talk about the south is still living the civil war? No, it isn't. But, it did make the south what it is today, and in the big scheme of things, it wasn't that long ago. Prior to moving west, as a very young boy living in the South, I was still able to see damage done by Yankee, excuse me, Union soldiers. The railroad across the road from my house had been there a long, long time. During the civil war, Yankee (darn, excuse me, there I go again), Union troops had torn up the tracks, heating them up and wrapping them around trees so that the southerners couldn't come behind them and put the tracks back together. Those rails were still there in the trees.

The war was recent enough that there are still quite a few people alive today (including me) that know people who knew someone who fought in that war. In that light, it puts it a little closer, it truly wasn't that long ago.

So, from my perspective, as a Yankee (American) I'll call whomever I choose a Yankee. I've never known it to be a pejorative unless preceded by "damn"...and then it is properly used as one word...damnyankee...and there are some of those.

I have to agree, Im from the west and I never referred to states as the Midwest,South or the Northeast, to me, everything was just "back east", and that includes Alabama,Indiana and New Hampshire, its all in the eastern part of the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2010, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,670 posts, read 25,762,744 times
Reputation: 8145
Quote:
Originally Posted by cokatie View Post
Well, as one who has been called a Yankee numerous times by the good people of Arkansas, South Carolina, Tennessee, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Georgia and Alabama, I can state unequivocally that New York qualifies as a "Yankee" state. Even our frozen cousins to the North (Oh, Canada) have used that terminology on me!
This may be heresy to people in the South but many Canadians actually use "Yankee" or "Yank" as a generic terms for any person from the United States, whether they're from Georgia or New Hampshire.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2010, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY, Northern CA
24 posts, read 33,058 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by skinem View Post
No kidding you never implied southerners are the only ones who divide this country, nor was my comment regarding that aimed at you at all. Another poster didn't imply it, he outright said that southerners were the only one that did. I guess you didn't read all the posts, or believe that all comments are aimed specifically at you.
My apologies. Your post had no "quote" and was only a couple posts after mine, talking about stuff I had hit on, so I assumed it was directed at me. It wouldn't be the first time I responded to someone inadvertently...

Quote:
Originally Posted by skinem View Post
You've obviously missed my point. I even said that they aren't reliving it. People in the South don't "obsess" over the Civil War.
I'm not sure I agree with that, but not being from the south, I can't say you're wrong either. However, I would certainly describe many of my southern friend's interest in the civil war as borderline "obsessive" in that it comes up fairly often (especially since I'm from the North), and in how they talk about it ("war of northern aggression" is a common description, instead of talking about what the war was really about, i.e. slavery). I would just think people would want to move on from that dark time in our country's history...but that's just my opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skinem View Post
I think you're remarks do indicate that you may not really grasp some aspects of history in that you don't believe that historically speaking it was recent.
Yes, in the context of history, it wasn't that long ago; but in the context of American history, it wasn't that recent. Think of how much has changed since 1865 in this country. The south has grown so much, even in the last 25 years, let alone the past 140.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skinem View Post
As to "why don't some northerners talk about it all of the time too" (sic), again you need to expand your understanding of the impact such a cataclysmic event can have upon a region and a people. The north wasn't defeated, destroyed socially, politicially, physically, and economically as the south was. That'll have an impact on you that lasts. Historians recognize that the south has suffered decades and decades due to the results of that war.
Ok, now you're getting at what I'm interested in. I could see this as probably part of why the war is viewed so differently in the north vs. the south.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skinem View Post
But that's not what this thread is about. It's about whether or not people use the term "yankee". They do. And, IMO, it's amazing that some find it offensive. Historically it is a term that has been adopted by Americans for generations with pride. It's amazing to me that anyone would be offended being called that...or a Johnny Reb, rebel, westerner, or even a Californian.
Agreed. I'm sorry for taking the thread down this direction, so let's get back on topic. My southern friends don't honestly call me Yankee that much, and I've really only ever been called it by Canadians. I do find it funny that it's still used at all really nowadays, since it seems like an outdated word.

Last edited by FunTime; 08-24-2010 at 07:08 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2010, 07:11 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,673,567 times
Reputation: 1661
Default Well, Blacks call each other the N world

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
>>>>>
or girls who call each other *******, if some random guy called me and my friend *******, he'd regret it. Call it stupid if you want
<<<<<

Yes, it sounds quite stupid....girls calling girls the "B" word. Very stupid indeed.

When did we get to a point in our society where this kind of talk is acceptable? Where women can call other women very degrading terms? (And no, I would not put Yankee anywhere in the same solar system as the "B" word in terms of negativity.)

Very sad if you ask this ol' Okie.
too don't they? And Italians call each other another word, etc., etc. Lesbians (my daughter is one) call each other dykes, also. Actually, since I moved to the South, it really doesn't bother me being called a Yankee. It's what I am in comparison to them. I actually think of it is a complement. THEY may not think so, but I do. It's kinda like my daughter says it doesn't bother her being called a dyke because that is what she is, as she says.

That that make sense? So many of these terms are truly in the eye of the beholder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2010, 10:21 PM
 
5,659 posts, read 13,632,149 times
Reputation: 3186
Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
too don't they? And Italians call each other another word, etc., etc. Lesbians (my daughter is one) call each other dykes, also. Actually, since I moved to the South, it really doesn't bother me being called a Yankee. It's what I am in comparison to them. I actually think of it is a complement. THEY may not think so, but I do. It's kinda like my daughter says it doesn't bother her being called a dyke because that is what she is, as she says.

That that make sense? So many of these terms are truly in the eye of the beholder.
Reminds me of some TV news footage I saw from the 70s. It was Boston's first Gay Pride Parade and some of the citizenry were scandalized. One dirtball standing along the route with other hecklers yelled at the marchers, "You're all a bunch of faggits, every one of ya!" I'm not gay but I thought if I was a marcher I'd've just said to him, "Um, yeah, that's the point!"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2010, 10:39 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,834 posts, read 9,416,417 times
Reputation: 6070
Quote:
Originally Posted by eek View Post
Eek, the guy mentions City-Data a couple of times. Is this you?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2010, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
5,894 posts, read 6,957,954 times
Reputation: 10190
Here in Michigan we do not call ourselves yankees. Midwesterners yes, northerners yes, but ive never heard anyone here that liked being called a yankee. Now out east there are many people who call themselves yankees, especially in New England. Funny how southerners use that word as a blanket term for all northerners, even though the north is so very different from one part to another. The midwest is nothing like the northeast, so to assume that we all call ourselves yankees is obsurd. The word yankee belongs to the New England area, and somewhat to the rest of the northeast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2011, 10:38 AM
 
1 posts, read 889 times
Reputation: 13
Yankees are from Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, New York, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Connecticut, Delaware, and Maryland. However, some might argue that Yankees are strictly "New Englanders". A humorous aphorism attributed to E. B. White summarizes these distinctions:

To foreigners, a Yankee is an American.
To Americans, a Yankee is a Northerner.
To Northerners, a Yankee is an Easterner.
To Easterners, a Yankee is a New Englander.
To New Englanders, a Yankee is a Vermonter.
And in Vermont, a Yankee is somebody who eats pie for breakfast.

Dig?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2011, 10:49 AM
 
11,026 posts, read 21,633,207 times
Reputation: 10669
I was in Arkansas a few years ago and everyone we met was all Yankee this and Yankee that. "Oh you Yankees".

I'm sorry, I grew up in Iowa and have lived in Chicago for around 10 years now. Never once in my life have I ever heard someone from the Midwest even use the word Yankee except for the baseball team, let alone had I ever been called one or thought of myself as one. I was kinda shocked everyone used it so much down south - and especialy since we said we're from the MIDWEST.

I assumed Yankee was some old term in the 1800's for people from the Northeast. I didn't know it applied today, or that it was EVERYONE outside the south.

It was very interesting, because for someone from the north, people in the northeast live in the northeast, people down south live down sough, I live in the midwest. The sky is blue, my car has 4 doors. It just was what it was, I never concerned myself with the regions really. Down south everyone we talked to was like "so would you ever vote for a Southerner as president???". "What do you think of Southerners?". "Are you nervous about being down south?". "I've never been up north". My friend worked down there and said her coworkers talked as if they were frighened to come up north, like they were still at war or something and would have to defend themselves as southerners. It was this big mysterious area to them. So odd. No one up here even thinks twice. This was in a town of maybe 20,000 people though, a couple hours from an interstate or shopping mall or airport. I'm sure that had a lot to do with it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top