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View Poll Results: Which city would you repopulate?
Detroit 46 37.10%
Baltimore 10 8.06%
Cleveland 9 7.26%
St. Louis 14 11.29%
Pittsburgh 9 7.26%
Buffalo 4 3.23%
New Orleans 27 21.77%
Cincinnati 5 4.03%
Voters: 124. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 12-04-2011, 11:16 PM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,884 posts, read 3,546,591 times
Reputation: 2327
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Compared to New Orleans, those cities aren't that unique. Generally speaking, the city centers and urban areas are still broadly similar, some rowhouses, some skyscrapers, dense grids, older architecture, etc. New Orleans is the only one that you can find multiple attributes and characteristics that are found only in New Orleans: The French Quarter, the accents, the foods, the traditions, etc.
Again, not bashing the other cities...
I find many similarities between New Orleans and other older southern cities such as Savannah and Charleston.

The other cities in the list differ primarily based on whether they are Great Lakes cities (Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit) with flat topography and mostly post-1900 industrial boom architecture, or Victorian river cities (Cincy, Pittsburgh, St. Louis) with hilly terrain and an abundance of Victorians and row-houses (although I know Buffalo has some of those).

But my main point is that, based on your criteria, almost every city has other cities that are similar to it, architecturally or otherwise. Chicago and Detroit. Baltimore and Philly. Cleveland and Buffalo. Pittsburgh and Cincy. Charleston and New Orleans. Yet, every city also has its own unique characteristics that set it apart.

Saying this list is a "generic list of cities" is just wrong. Compared to what? What city can't be compared to another?

I think a better question to ask of this poll would have been, "Which city needs repopulation the most?" Obviously, all of the cities could benefit from it, but which are hurting the most from the effects of depopulation? In my opinion, Detroit, followed by Buffalo. I think the rest are going to be just fine.

Last edited by PreservationPioneer; 12-04-2011 at 11:30 PM..
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Old 12-04-2011, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
10,435 posts, read 7,603,400 times
Reputation: 4734
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
I find many similarities between New Orleans and other older southern cities such as Savannah and Charleston.

The other cities in the list differ primarily based on whether they are Great Lakes cities (Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit) with flat topography and mostly post-1900 industrial boom architecture, or Victorian river cities (Cincy, Pittsburgh, St. Louis) with hilly terrain and an abundance of Victorians and row-houses (although I know Buffalo has some of those).

But my main point is that, based on your criteria, almost every city has other cities that are similar to it, architecturally or otherwise. Chicago and Detroit. Baltimore and Philly. Cleveland and Buffalo. Pittsburgh and Cincy. Charleston and New Orleans. Yet, every city also has its own unique characteristics that set it apart.

Saying this list is a "generic list of cities" is just wrong. Compared to what? What city can't be compared to another?

I think a better question to ask of this poll would have been, "Which city needs repopulation the most?" Obviously, all of the cities could benefit from it, but which are hurting the most from the effects of depopulation? In my opinion, Detroit, followed by Buffalo. I think the rest are going to be just fine.
Other than face value, how does New Orleans compare to Savannah and Charleston?

Compared to New Orleans, I said that in my previous post.

Out of this list, NOLA stands out as the most unique. That was the point, do you disagree?
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Old 12-05-2011, 02:12 AM
 
Location: City of McKeesport
3,884 posts, read 3,546,591 times
Reputation: 2327
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Other than face value, how does New Orleans compare to Savannah and Charleston?
Similar architecture, that "old south" voodoo atmosphere, Spanish moss, history, proximity to the ocean...I could go on.

Quote:
Out of this list, NOLA stands out as the most unique. That was the point, do you disagree?
Are you saying that NOLA is more unique than the other cities, or are you saying that NOLA is unique within the list? NOLA is the only historic southern city in the list, so that makes it unique within the list. However, if you are saying that NOLA has more unique qualities than St. Louis, for example, I'm not sure I agree.
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Old 12-05-2011, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
10,435 posts, read 7,603,400 times
Reputation: 4734
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
Similar architecture, that "old south" voodoo atmosphere, Spanish moss, history, proximity to the ocean...I could go on.
The others are ok, proximity to the ocean, no.


Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyange
Are you saying that NOLA is more unique than the other cities, or are you saying that NOLA is unique within the list? NOLA is the only historic southern city in the list, so that makes it unique within the list. However, if you are saying that NOLA has more unique qualities than St. Louis, for example, I'm not sure I agree.
The first question is all the same, and yes. St. Louis would be the only competition.
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Old 12-05-2011, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
1,238 posts, read 1,168,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
... that are found only in New Orleans: The French Quarter...
To be fair, there are areas in the US bordering Quebec that are MUCH more French than New Orleans.
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Old 12-05-2011, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
10,435 posts, read 7,603,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
To be fair, there are areas in the US bordering Quebec that are MUCH more French than New Orleans.
I never mentioned the French history in New Orleans, which is just as influenced by the Spanish and Africans.
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Old 01-24-2012, 09:31 AM
 
718 posts, read 446,134 times
Reputation: 574
Cleveland. How could I pick anywhere else but my hometown.
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Old 01-24-2012, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ area
5,392 posts, read 2,968,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Why did they abandoned it? It doesn't make sense.
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Old 01-24-2012, 11:42 AM
 
958 posts, read 174,127 times
Reputation: 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Also, repopulating Philly or Chicago to their peak would take pretty great advantage of the infrastructure already in place and add to the inertia they already have.
Already in the works my friend. The entire metro is seeing growth and revitalization, though certain places will take longer than others, like Chester, Camden, Wilmington, etc.

My answer has to be Detroit. Look at those numbers.. almost 2 million people at its peak! The other cities aren't as big as Detroit, which means they can come back a lot easier.

Detroit though, what is used to be is on the level of New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, etc etc. The one thing Detroit really has going for it.. well two things.. is that it has retained multiple things from when it was a major city and that it still has things like the Red Wings and the Tigers and the Pistons. It really only has one "loser" team, which is of course the Lions. Its architecture in places is amazing.. the art deco theaters and buildings to name two examples.

Places like Detroit and Philadelphia are cities that put the US on a whole other level when they're at their peak. Those two cities contributed so much to this country at one point, in every aspect of life. They were both manufacturing giants, both were very important culturally, both were destination cities, and Philadelphia is becoming one again.

I think that this century is the century where the cities that were most important up until the mid 20th century regain their former importance and stature.
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Old 01-24-2012, 12:01 PM
 
958 posts, read 174,127 times
Reputation: 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by cle2sf View Post
When I voted, I looked for one that would create a city that fills a unfilled niche or gap in the region.

Detroit: would be a top-5 city and very vibrant. However, it would be a LOT like Chicago, which isn't too far away geographically.
Baltimore: Wouldn't really change population rankings of the Bos-Wash corridor. Declined the least of the eight cities listed.
Cleveland: It would be a San Francisco or Boston of the Midwest. No other city in the region would have a similar population, except Columbus and Indianapolis, which have much less of an urban feel.
St. Louis: Like Cleveland, it would probably be a very unique city unlike any other in the region.
Pittsburgh: Already a cool city with an interesting setting. A population boost would really make it a destination.
Buffalo: It would be like Milwaukee. Still overshadowed by its neighbor (Toronto).
New Orleans: This city really has character. It would undoubtedly be the coolest city in the South.
Cincinnati: Maybe they'd finally build a light rail system.
Detroit/Chicago would sort of be like the Philadelphia/NYC situation huh

The one thing Detroit has going for it compared to Chicago is that so much of its older architecture hasn't been demolished to make way for new buildings. Its most distinctive building is from the early 20th Century whereas Chicago's is from the 70s and looks every bit like a building from that era (my least favorite era architecturally). Actually, there are a few cities that either have distinctive older-style skyscrapers or ones that look older-style, like the Key tower in Cleveland or the new skyscraper in Mobile, Alabama. That, in my opinion, is the height of great US architecture. The art-deco buildings of that era have such ornate, detailed features. The Empire State Building in my opinion is a work of art, as are Detroit's older art-deco skyscrapers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alleghenyangel View Post
I find many similarities between New Orleans and other older southern cities such as Savannah and Charleston.

The other cities in the list differ primarily based on whether they are Great Lakes cities (Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit) with flat topography and mostly post-1900 industrial boom architecture, or Victorian river cities (Cincy, Pittsburgh, St. Louis) with hilly terrain and an abundance of Victorians and row-houses (although I know Buffalo has some of those).

But my main point is that, based on your criteria, almost every city has other cities that are similar to it, architecturally or otherwise. Chicago and Detroit. Baltimore and Philly. Cleveland and Buffalo. Pittsburgh and Cincy. Charleston and New Orleans. Yet, every city also has its own unique characteristics that set it apart.

Saying this list is a "generic list of cities" is just wrong. Compared to what? What city can't be compared to another?

I think a better question to ask of this poll would have been, "Which city needs repopulation the most?" Obviously, all of the cities could benefit from it, but which are hurting the most from the effects of depopulation? In my opinion, Detroit, followed by Buffalo. I think the rest are going to be just fine.
Agreed about Detroit, 100%

I'd say Baltimore and Pittsburgh are more similar than Baltimore and Philadelphia are though.
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