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View Poll Results: Is Boston as urban as Chicago
Yes, as urban or more so 65 53.28%
No, not as urban 57 46.72%
Voters: 122. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-23-2012, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Does Chicago have better overall PT than Boston?

Boston lacks rail coverage in a few places in the city, namely the eastern part of Roxbury, west part of Dorchester, South Boston, Brighton Center and Lower Allston.

I'm sure Chicago has some gaps in coverage as well, I would be curious to see what they are.
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Old 01-23-2012, 04:47 PM
 
Location: San Leandro
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Boston is a provincial small town compared to Chicago. No way.
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Old 01-23-2012, 04:48 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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I guessed the Boston suburbs or the Philly suburbs would be more urban than the Chicago suburbs because they're older but maybe I'm wrong.
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Old 01-23-2012, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Hell's Kitchen, NYC
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It is and it isn't in a way. Boston has a very dense core, but once you go a few miles, you're in single family home ville. Boston could be a neighborhood in a Chicago. Scale-wise it just isn't as urban, IMO. It's arguable though.
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
It is and it isn't in a way. Boston has a very dense core, but once you go a few miles, you're in single family home ville. Boston could be a neighborhood in a Chicago. Scale-wise it just isn't as urban, IMO. It's arguable though.
I think you are selling Boston short and overselling Chicago. As you know, if places like Cambridge or Somerville (seamlessly part of the city really, I know a river splits em) were part of Boston it would be much larger but still retain a high density.

Boston is the 22nd largest city but the 10th largest metro. I still think Chicago is more urban but its not a large canyon.
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:02 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I guessed the Boston suburbs or the Philly suburbs would be more urban than the Chicago suburbs because they're older but maybe I'm wrong.
In general the tighter in burbs but Chicago already covers a larger footprint. Extending further Chicgo is more consistent without as many older towns with small pockets of more dense developement overall.

The short answer is they are different enough that it is hard to say definatively
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Hell's Kitchen, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I think you are selling Boston short and overselling Chicago. As you know, if places like Cambridge or Somerville (seamlessly part of the city really, I know a river splits em) were part of Boston it would be much larger but still retain a high density.

Boston is the 22nd largest city but the 10th largest metro. I still think Chicago is more urban but its not a large canyon.
I think people tend to oversell Boston. Cambridge and Somerville are not technically part of the city, so I'm not including them in my analysis. (I actually like Cambridge much more than I like Boston, in any case.) The density Boston conveys in its core is diluted once you leave a small section of the city.

Last edited by theSUBlime; 01-23-2012 at 05:16 PM..
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
I think people tend to oversell Boston. Cambridge and Somerville are not technically part of the city, so I'm not including them in my analysis. (I actually like Cambridge much more than I like Boston, in any case.) The neighborhoods that actually make up more of Boston city proper tend to be far removed from the core.
Really there are tons of people that never left Dorcester or Eastie there entire lives exept for a few times.
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
I think people tend to oversell Boston. Cambridge is not part of the city, so I'm not including it in my analysis. (I actually like Cambridge much more than I like Boston, in any case.) City neighborhoods in Boston are a actually a lot less self-sufficient than one might think.
I agree that many aspects of Boston are overrated on this forum.

I just have a hard time separating Somerville and Cambridge because they are so close to the CBD and basically in the middle of the "hub". Same with the most northern parts of Brookline.
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:17 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I am really familiar with Boston and only slightly familiar with Philadelphia (and what I know is limited to my one downtown experience and Philly posters here ) but I think they would be very comparable.

Philadelphia (I think) is grittier. It also has more rowhouses, while Boston has more of a mix of rowhouses, stand alone apartment buildings and Victorian style double decker duplexes.

Think overall they are very similar with some differences you noted, and yes grittier, though IMHO a little more lively as well overall.

In terms of footprint maintained with 10K density

Boston and SF at ~140 sq miles
Philly at 200 sq miles
Chicago and LA at about 280 sq miles
NYC at about 650 sq miles
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