U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 01-28-2012, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Brazil
234 posts, read 752,359 times
Reputation: 160

Advertisements

Which cities are most expensive and which one are the cheapest to live in?

I heard living in some cities in MA, can be very expensive. That most parts of MA is expensive.

I heard living in some places in NJ are cheap, but can be very dangerous. Like Bloomfield and Newark and so on.

I mean which places in America is cheapest and which one is the most expensive to live in?


Example: Rent here in Boston, MA. Is very expensive from $1000.00 for one bedroom apartment. House to buy here goes from $500,000.00 and up.
The electric bill is from 80 - 200 dollars depending on the season.
The telephone bill is around 100 dollars.
The water bill depend on the apartment it is either included or you pay separately 40 dollars.
Cable is like 20 bucks.
and movie theater is like 8 bucks a movie.
Grocery ranges from 200 dollars for 2 people only.
If you want to buy a tv of 32inches HDTV flat screen it will cost you like 800 dollars.
To buy a sofa it like 200 dollars a two seated one.
and a blender it like 30 bucks and so on.

the bus here depending on the zone. just one zone is 1.25 dollars.

Blah blah...

Now jobs here depending on area...if you want a job that 10 bucks an hour you have to have high school you will have offers like as a supermarket cashier working 8 hours a day.
If you want 15 you have to have some kind of a course, certificate so on.

If you want to work as a teacher you need this type of certificate and you can start as a day care teacher, at a pay of 30 thousand dollar with benefits of dental and health plan and some sort of retirement plan.
If you want to be an librarian then is this and that..

Understand? Can anyone fill me in, how is it living in your neighborhood much cheaper then say another neighborhood? And that finding job in your city is way easier, then finding any kind of job in this other city.

By the day I am doing my research, before I make my big move. I am currently working as an art teacher here in Brazil. I have a university diploma in Pedagogy which would be consider Early Childhood Education there in the US. But I will have to see if it is valid there, if I am lacking any kind of curriculum and etc. To be able to work there as a Teacher. I do plan on going back to college there and making up what is lacking. Maybe do ESL?
Which teachers are in most demand in your city? ESL or SPED teacher?

Thank you so much, and God bless.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-28-2012, 01:27 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,795,233 times
Reputation: 4125
I would say more rural towns are cheaper. But they don't have the amenities or activities to do.

Seattle is very expensive, sounds about the same (maybe somewhat cheaper housing) than Boston, but not by much.

But areas south of Seattle, like Tacoma, Olympia, and nearer the Oregon border (closer to Portland) there's opportunities for ESL.

To be honest I don't think that your degree from a Brazilian university will hold much water here, not with a very large talent pool of local American university degrees. I would recommend getting a certificate here in the US first before trying to do daycare teaching.

You should also take classes to remove your accent. I'm serious, it does help. Judging from your grammar, I also would recommend taking advanced English classes with native English speakers. I can understand you but some of your grammar like " how is it living in your neighborhood much cheaper then say another neighborhood?" just to me says your mastery of English needs improving.

That shouldn't stop you from trying to find jobs though. Maybe look for areas in the US with a large Brazilian expatriate population, or Portuguese. There your role could play as a cultural bridge and linguistic bridge. But DEFINITELY improve your English first if you want to compete with the hundreds of thousands of native English ESL speakers, who are fluent in both languages.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2012, 04:08 AM
 
Location: Brazil
234 posts, read 752,359 times
Reputation: 160
Smile Thank you for your suggestion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
I would say more rural towns are cheaper. But they don't have the amenities or activities to do.

Seattle is very expensive, sounds about the same (maybe somewhat cheaper housing) than Boston, but not by much.

But areas south of Seattle, like Tacoma, Olympia, and nearer the Oregon border (closer to Portland) there's opportunities for ESL.

To be honest I don't think that your degree from a Brazilian university will hold much water here, not with a very large talent pool of local American university degrees. I would recommend getting a certificate here in the US first before trying to do daycare teaching.

You should also take classes to remove your accent. I'm serious, it does help. Judging from your grammar, I also would recommend taking advanced English classes with native English speakers. I can understand you but some of your grammar like " how is it living in your neighborhood much cheaper then say another neighborhood?" I am not sure how I would rephrase it but would it be correct to say 'Is living in your city cheaper than living in another city?" I need to pay more attention when writing.I was raised in America went to school from pre-school to college there, all my schooling is from there. Don't know why I am messing it up. LOL. I guess I am confusing my english and portuguese. Just to me says your mastery of English needs improving.

That shouldn't stop you from trying to find jobs though. Maybe look for areas in the US with a large Brazilian expatriate population, or Portuguese. There your role could play as a cultural bridge and linguistic bridge. But DEFINITELY improve your English first if you want to compete with the hundreds of thousands of native English ESL speakers, who are fluent in both languages.
I do plan on going back to college and making up what I am lacking and etc. I mean I heard that my diploma in Pedagogy can be evaluated to see if it matches the requirement of a degree on education there in the US. Yes, I agree with you that I will have to improve my english and grammar, I don't have much of an accent but I am having problem with my grammar writing, because I am confusing my portuguese with the english grammar at times. But, I do plan on solving that situation before competing in the field with others. I do want to be certified and qualified. I mean I don't want to be those teachers that don´t know anything and is in a classroom. Believe me the way the teachers are hired in America, it is all about connection knowing the principal or someone in the educational system and you are in. When I use to live in Newark, NJ. There were many Purto Ricans and others ,who got into day care and even elementary schools with out even speaking english that good, imagine their grammar skills. I personally think that is stupid, a person should know the language of the country they are teaching in. I mean if you are in America learn english, if you are in Spain learn spanish. I agree with you that I will need to improve myself. I mean teachers are not encyclopedias but they need to know their limits and their weakness and try to fix it, and go try to know the subject matter they plan on teaching, do their research or what not. Teachers need to put quality in their work, if there are to be any development from their students.
Again thanks.

Last edited by Romila; 01-29-2012 at 04:19 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2012, 10:33 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,250 posts, read 19,550,442 times
Reputation: 13013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romila View Post
Which cities are most expensive and which one are the cheapest to live in?
The most expensive U.S. city to live in is New York City, particularly Manhattan. The standard rent for 1-bedroom apartments there is $3000 a month.

Other expensive cities are San Francisco/San Jose, Los Angeles, Washington DC, San Degio, Boston and Seattle.

Cities get less expensive from there.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top