U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-23-2012, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Betsyville
104 posts, read 235,179 times
Reputation: 122

Advertisements

I love homes! Especially brick, tudor, and craftsman style homes. So tell me where you've seen some really beautiful homes, and they can also be condos.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-23-2012, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
1,376 posts, read 2,508,499 times
Reputation: 1147
I'm in love with craftsman and victorian houses myself. I also like the modern houses you see up in the Pacific Northwest like Seattle, many of the "normal" houses seem to have really neat looking pastel colours too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2012, 07:38 PM
 
74 posts, read 185,514 times
Reputation: 90
I think by houses you mean, "single family" right? Chicago is the best city for brick houses, especially bungalows. But the only problem is if you dont have central air, a brick house in Chicago is a heat trap in the summer. I grew up near the Auburn Gresham and Englewood border in a brick house from age 7 to about 13 on 76th Street with NO central air. My immediate area consisted mostly of duplex apartments and greystone buildings, me and my family were one of the few families on my block who owned their own single home. Everyone else there lived in some very slummy ass apartments next to vacant lots, garbage, trash, etc. This hood was and still is the slums and a major hood for the Gangster Disciples.

Having your own house is cool especially in a rough area like 76th where so many people lived on top of eachother. But with no central air I only had a window fan. And the problem was that the apartments and houses on my block were SO CLOSER together that they blocked eachother and you'd get ABSOLUTELY NO AIR flowing from outside. It used to get so hot that I used to sleep butt naked during the summer. Everything else about living in your own house is cool though, especially when half of your block lived in crowded apartments.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2012, 12:27 AM
 
958 posts, read 919,278 times
Reputation: 228
Every older city and town has the nicest homes.

I definitely don't agree that Chicago is the best city for brick houses though, given the fact that the unofficial facade of most Philadelphia and metro houses is in fact red brick.

Boston seems to have some amazing ones too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2012, 09:36 AM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,933 posts, read 7,568,040 times
Reputation: 9253
St Louis has thousands of beautiful brick houses, some of the best in the country, Detroit as well for brick, colonial, craftsman and Tudor style- sadly, so many have been lost.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2012, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
9,832 posts, read 7,658,511 times
Reputation: 6288
Style represented in the Los Angeles area: Adobe, Italianate, Eastlake, Queen Anne, Mission Revival, Craftsman, Bungalow, Spanish Colonial Revival, Storybook, Tudor, International, Streamline, Colonial, Minimal Traditional, Ranch, Modern

The city is considered most influential with regards to housing architecture in modern times.

Last edited by RaymondChandlerLives; 02-24-2012 at 12:40 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2012, 12:09 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,933 posts, read 7,568,040 times
Reputation: 9253
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
Style represented in the Los Angeles area: Adobe, Italianate, Eastlake, Queen Anne, Mission Revival, Craftsman, Bungalow, Spanish Colonial Revival, Storybook, Tudor, International, Streamline, Colonial, Minimal Traditional, Ranch, Modern

The city is considered the most influential city in regards to housing architecture in modern times.
I completely agree but didn't want too seem to Southern California/L.A. puffery.

No other city in the U.S. or the world for that matter has the residential architectural diversity and landmark examples as does L.A.- it is architecture porn in my mind. I just can't get enough of wandering in all its wonderful neighborhoods and checking out the houses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2012, 01:04 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,933 posts, read 7,568,040 times
Reputation: 9253
Anybody who can snap off such architectural style terms such as Eastlake (Angelino Heights) and Streamline (although I prefer the term Streamline Moderne- I actually designed a renovation for a rare example here in San Diego) occupies a very warm spot in this architect's heart.

You forgot what I consider a paramount L.A. style- Rengency, that elegant Colonial Revival meets Georgian married to Art Deco so popular to the stars of the late 30s, and 40s. Almost always white stucco and painted brick, two story simple forms elegantly layered with classical elements and applied detailing to the windows, doors and rooflines. Copied often in the area but rare outside of L.A. Many examples on the West side.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2012, 02:19 PM
 
958 posts, read 919,278 times
Reputation: 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
I completely agree but didn't want too seem to Southern California/L.A. puffery.

No other city in the U.S. or the world for that matter has the residential architectural diversity and landmark examples as does L.A.
Not even remotely.

LA is famous for postwar architecture and that's it. Every other type can be found elsewhere, not just in LA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2012, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,079,856 times
Reputation: 3979
Quote:
Originally Posted by couldntthinkofaclevername View Post
Not even remotely.

LA is famous for postwar architecture and that's it. Every other type can be found elsewhere, not just in LA.
LA is well known for postwar architecture but much (maybe even most) of the central historic city is prewar. In 1920 the city had a population of 576,673 and in 1930 it had a population of 1,238,048. That is a lot of homes that had to be built (and every single one is pre-war ). Do you really think most of these are gone now?

In fact the building I live in was built in the 1920s and most of the buildings in my neighborhood are from that era too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:20 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top