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Old 02-24-2012, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Weymouth, The South
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I know amongst the contiguous states that New Jersey is technically the densest and Wyoming the least dense with regards to population, but are these actually the states that feel most and least dense?

I can imagine that quite a few of the western and midwestern states feel pretty sparsely populated, so is it possible to actually say one 'feels' more sparse than any other? Also, is NJ the densest feeling state?

I don't see density or lack there of as anything other than what it is. A sparse state isn't any worse than a dense one, so though I'm sure some will come out with comments which are along those lines, it's not my aim to start an argument.

Last edited by BruceTenmile; 02-24-2012 at 05:21 AM..
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Old 02-24-2012, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
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I think Wyoming definitely feels as sparse as it is...same with Idaho. Driving through them it becomes apparent. I'll bet Montana feels similar.

Driving across I-10 in Texas you can get both feelings...you pass thru Houston, SA, and El Paso, but between each are massive swaths of nothingness, esp. b/w SA and El Paso.
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Old 02-24-2012, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Weymouth, The South
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^^Mmm, that's what I think I was trying to get at but couldn't put my finger on. Obviously some states have a huge amount of their population clustered in one or a couple of areas, so whilst the state may have a fairly high density when you take those into account, it could have some very sparse areas.

I know Loving County, TX has the lowest population in the country and that the state population is massively concentrated so this is all a round about way of asking:
Do states which have high density due to very large metro areas have any regions which feel as sparse or less dense than a state with a far more even spread, but lower population?
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Old 02-24-2012, 03:12 PM
 
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Nevada feels extremely sparse once you leave Reno/Carson City in the west or the Las Vegas metro in the south. Driving north from Vegas or east or north of Reno you go through some of the most empty feeling and desolate terrain in the lower 48. The few towns out there feel pretty isolated. You could make a case for Wyoming also--Wyoming might be more uniformly sparse throughout the whole state--but at the same time there's more small settlements scattered through the state than in much of Nevada.

Eastern Oregon is also very sparsely populated. The SE corner is one of the most barren deserts in the US.

Last edited by Deezus; 02-24-2012 at 03:53 PM..
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Old 02-24-2012, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
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Despite New Jersey being statistically the most dense state in the union, there are parts of it that feel quite open. Hunterdon County for example. East Coast cities don't seem to sprawl as much as west coast cities.
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Old 02-24-2012, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Weymouth, The South
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There's no seem about it, east coast cities don't sprawl as much. I assumed there were open areas in all states, but I didn't think NJ would have an are which felt really sparse.
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Old 02-24-2012, 04:18 PM
 
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Pretty much any of the small states: Delaware, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Hawaii, New Jersey are overall denser in feeling.

Of the larger states it would probably be Florida, Ohio, California in that order. All 3 have lots of sprawl, multiple major metros and many large metros and +100,000 cities in between. Perhaps North Carolina would be 4th as it too has a good number of large cities for its size.
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Old 02-24-2012, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Queens, NY
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This may help..

List of U.S. states by population density - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And yes, the denser states 'feel' denser, because there are more people in community after community, whereas in Wyoming people feel isolated because they are.. there are less metropolitan areas, less suburbs, less cities reaching into each others suburban neighbors. In NJ, RI, CT and MA one can drive for hours along residential streets from one town to the next without encountering hills (or one can head for the hills very quickly.. the point is in the contiguous megalopolis that you could go for miles and miles in urban and suburban setting. In Wyoming this is impossible.. in Cheyenne, Casper, or elsewhere you'll be in ranchland within a 20 minute drive if not sooner).

There are places in the most densely populated states that are as sparse as anywhere.. in New York Hamilton County is among the least populated counties in the US with a density of 5 people per square mile, equal to that of Wyoming. It makes up about 1/5th of Adirondack State Park.
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Old 02-24-2012, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
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Interstate 10 between San Antonio and El Paso is the most boring highway to have ever been constructed, anywhere, ever. If valium was a road, it would be THAt road.
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Old 02-24-2012, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Weymouth, The South
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYisontop View Post
This may help..

List of U.S. states by population density - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And yes, the denser states 'feel' denser, because there are more people in community after community, whereas in Wyoming people feel isolated because they are.. there are less metropolitan areas, less suburbs, less cities reaching into each others suburban neighbors. In NJ, RI, CT and MA one can drive for hours along residential streets from one town to the next without encountering hills (or one can head for the hills very quickly.. the point is in the contiguous megalopolis that you could go for miles and miles in urban and suburban setting. In Wyoming this is impossible.. in Cheyenne, Casper, or elsewhere you'll be in ranchland within a 20 minute drive if not sooner).

There are places in the most densely populated states that are as sparse as anywhere.. in New York Hamilton County is among the least populated counties in the US with a density of 5 people per square mile, equal to that of Wyoming. It makes up about 1/5th of Adirondack State Park.
Well no, I'm pretty familiar with the density rankings, I wanted to know about how things feel when you're in these states rather than actually how dense they are which (as much as I love them) is just a number.

Obviously on the whole the denser states feel denser and the opposite is true too. I just was looking for any outliers which are totally unbalanced and seem less dense than the bare stats suggest. New York as you mention is probably one of those instances as a huge percentage live in NYC and if you cut them out, the density would nearly half.
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