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Old 03-08-2012, 11:08 AM
 
705 posts, read 783,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 75 South View Post
I left Atlanta for Denver 8 months ago. First off, Denver is so far from conservative. Democratic National Concention last year. 3 minority mayors in the past 20 years. Most cannibas dispenseries per capital in the country. And just to be frank, I'm a big city dweller that travels all around the world. I've lived in 3 of arguably the top 10 metros (not counting Denver). Denver is a smaller version of Chicago. I barbecued on Monday with almost 70 degree weather. The high today was 32. It's always sunny but the weather changes drastically. Apartments are not small but a little more expensive than Atlanta. This is a city. It's built on a grid. Everything is numbered and mapped out. One of a few American cities where the address maybe 836 Broadway and you know the cross street is 8th and Broadway. Now, this might not be for you, but I wil say this, pound for pound, it's very few cities that can offer high wage earnings and a high quality of life with low cost of living.
I'm pretty sure that Denver's wages are actually much lower than you would expect for the higher cost of living.

And, regarding its politics, the city of Denver is sort of libertarian/left-leaning, but the suburbs are more conservative, so it balances out. (But I'd still say that the area as a whole actually leans a bit to the right). That's not the case in Seattle or Chicago or many other major cities, most of which are thoroughly liberal. By the way, Denver is nothing like Chicago, either. They do share a similar midwestern sensibilty, but Chicago is America's Second City. Denver is is just Denver. It's a nice city, but I wouldn't get too carried away with the Chicago analogy.
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Old 03-08-2012, 11:17 AM
 
423 posts, read 373,596 times
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Unless you've lived downtown Chicago and downtown Denver, I could see why you wouldn't be able to understand. As I mentioned, having lived in the loop in Chicago and now, the Golden Triangle in Denver, it's so many similarities it's not even funny. Heck, the Sante Fe train line runs from Guadalajara, to Sante Fe, to Denver and stops in Chicago. The same Mexicans that live in Chicago, guess what, live in Denver? I'm not a homer. I just moved here 8 months ago. But, as I told you, I travel the world. I'm not the authority by no means but I've seen things and places that most haven't seen ... yet. With that being said, Denver is liberal. It's more liberal than any place that I've lived. Dude, you can contain illegal substances here. Only other place like this is California. Now, is the state red? Most years, yes. So are many of our major cities - blue metros; red states. Not that it matters which way one leans. It's just a fact. Look at Atlanta, Charlotte, New Orleans, Vegas, St. Louis on so on. Like I said, tell me where you've lived, not visited for a weekend and we can have an honest discussion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoneNative View Post
I'm pretty sure that Denver's wages are actually much lower than you would expect for the higher cost of living.

And, regarding its politics, the city of Denver is sort of libertarian/left-leaning, but the suburbs are more conservative, so it balances out. (But I'd still say that the area as a whole actually leans a bit to the right). That's not the case in Seattle or Chicago or many other major cities, most of which are thoroughly liberal. By the way, Denver is nothing like Chicago, either. They do share a similar midwestern sensibilty, but Chicago is America's Second City. Denver is is just Denver. It's a nice city, but I wouldn't get too carried away with the Chicago analogy.
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Old 03-08-2012, 12:41 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 8,690,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoneNative View Post
Seattle and Denver are very different from each other, and Denver is something like a mix of Phoenix and Seattle. You'll hear Rush Limbaugh as much as, and probably more than, "tree hugger" or "granola" in Denver.
Not really. I think Seattle and Denver have much in common. Take away the maritime / coastal aspects of Seattle and the built environment in both is very similar, though comparing the two you'd have to give Seattle the edge in terms of urban environment. Demographically, both cities are pretty similar as well -- very affluent, with relatively few minorities (though Denver's Latino population is much higher than Seattle's).

Politically, Denver has never been known as an ultra-liberal city, that's true -- but it's far from Rush Limbaugh territory, except perhaps for the far southern suburbs. Republicans are pretty much an endangered species in the city proper, and the few Republicans there are more of the Ron Paul / Gary Johnson variety (e.g., pro-legalization). Even the burbs, for the most part, tend to be largely independent.

FWIW Phoenix is very similar to suburban southern California. If you're familiar with Orange County or the Inland Empire -- take that and transplant it to the hot desert and that's pretty much what you have. Even the residents are mostly ex-Californians (though Seattle and Denver are full of ex-Californians too.) Phoenix is relatively conservative by big-city standards, though it pretty much reflects the suburban SoCal demographics it draws from -- it's not conservative in the same way the southeast is.
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Old 03-08-2012, 12:56 PM
 
705 posts, read 783,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tfox View Post
Not really. I think Seattle and Denver have much in common. Take away the maritime / coastal aspects of Seattle and the built environment in both is very similar, though comparing the two you'd have to give Seattle the edge in terms of urban environment. Demographically, both cities are pretty similar as well -- very affluent, with relatively few minorities (though Denver's Latino population is much higher than Seattle's).

Politically, Denver has never been known as an ultra-liberal city, that's true -- but it's far from Rush Limbaugh territory, except perhaps for the far southern suburbs. Republicans are pretty much an endangered species in the city proper, and the few Republicans there are more of the Ron Paul / Gary Johnson variety (e.g., pro-legalization). Even the burbs, for the most part, tend to be largely independent.
Rush Limbaugh's station here in Denver (KOA) is one of the most listened to in the area. It is, depending on the month, the most listened to station (notably, one of Denver's contemporary Christian stations is also one of the most listened to).

And Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum, not Ron Paul or Gary Johnson, placed first and second in most metro area counties in Denver in the caucuses here (in Adams County Santorum took first). Nearly 40% of Denver County voters voted to place an amendment in the constitution banning same-sex marriage. 44% voted 'no' to the legalization of marijuana (compared with 60% statewide). A majority voted 'no' last year to a statewide tax increase for schools (only three counties voted 'yes'). By the way, there are a fair number of Republicans in Denver County. One of them is a city council member in Denver (Charlie Brown), and another is the state Republican Party Chairman (Ryan Call). In the suburbs, I believe that active GOP voters outnumber active Democratic voters in almost every single metro area county except for Denver and, barely, socially conservative, blue collar Adams County. I am not positive about that, however.

And, finally, there are very few similarities between a huge, sophisticated, liberal metro area in the pacific northwest and a smaller, more parochial, more conservative metro area on the lip of the midwest and Rocky Mountain West. The cultural differences are vast. The similiarities are limited to large white populations and mountains, which don't really have anything to do with culture, politics, or anything else that might matter to a prospective newcomer.
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Old 03-09-2012, 12:06 AM
 
84 posts, read 103,340 times
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Gosh, I really don't care about politics AT ALL, I do appreciate all of your comments, but I skip over all the blue, red, romney, etc... comments....I just want some opinions about the living conditions of the three cities, and which would be better for me. If we were all in person, and the political comments came up, I would kindly leave the room and come back when it was done. My friends hate that about me.... Oh well, please stick to the topic for me since I could care less about politics... Thank you all Now, back to the topic at hand, Seattle, Denver, or Phoenix? Which would fit me the best
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Old 03-09-2012, 12:39 AM
 
8,025 posts, read 5,070,009 times
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I've been to all of them, but I have only lived in Seattle. It's such an odd assortment. I'd pick Seattle first (if you can afford it) then Denver, then Phoenix. If you live in the urban areas of Denver, it's going to feel a lot denser and more urban than you may expect. My main beef with Denver is that it's isolated. I'm a day tripper. There aren't a lot of cool places to go visit from there. I spent my college years in Seattle -- what a town. Great, great place. Yes, it rains and its gloomy, but it makes up for it. I guarantee something in the city will make you smile and think ... I love here, yay .. daily. It's a nice place. Phoenix isn't terrible -- not great, but not terrible.

I'd pick the place that was closet to friends and family. That's me though.
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Old 03-09-2012, 02:16 AM
 
423 posts, read 373,596 times
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I'm not trying to refute your stance nor disagree. I tollway respect your view. I would willing to bet, 5 years from now you laughed at your stance on politics. They RUN the place that you live. I'm certainly not telling you what to do or how to live. Just a piece of advice, you might want to make yourself aware of politics if where you are moving. From my experiences, taxes make a huge difference. and again, no disrespect, you are asking strangers for advice. I was once told that people ask for advice when they already know the answer and are unwilling to accept it. We don't know what you like. We don't know you. Only you know that. Unless you spend at least a week in each city, ou are doing your self a disservice. I preface, Im by no means attacking or belittling you. I have major respect for you and your question. I just felt the need to keep it real in a tactful way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue1Roses View Post
Gosh, I really don't care about politics AT ALL, I do appreciate all of your comments, but I skip over all the blue, red, romney, etc... comments....I just want some opinions about the living conditions of the three cities, and which would be better for me. If we were all in person, and the political comments came up, I would kindly leave the room and come back when it was done. My friends hate that about me.... Oh well, please stick to the topic for me since I could care less about politics... Thank you all Now, back to the topic at hand, Seattle, Denver, or Phoenix? Which would fit me the best
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Old 03-09-2012, 09:34 AM
 
2,417 posts, read 3,132,356 times
Reputation: 1891
Denver is a liberal city; plain and simple. They have been voting consistantly for liberal dems. since the early 70's: When did this become a news flash? I believe there are only two working class districts within the city that have any significant republican voting blocks. Denver is also home to one of the highest percentage gay communities in the nation. home to a thriving medical marijuana industry, a strong recycling eco- minded population , racially mixed local politicians. Denver is laid back liberal not militant in your face like Boulder or Aspen.

Last edited by Scott5280; 03-09-2012 at 09:50 AM..
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Old 03-09-2012, 12:01 PM
 
705 posts, read 783,710 times
Reputation: 596
Quote:
Originally Posted by 75 South View Post
Unless you've lived downtown Chicago and downtown Denver, I could see why you wouldn't be able to understand. As I mentioned, having lived in the loop in Chicago and now, the Golden Triangle in Denver, it's so many similarities it's not even funny. Heck, the Sante Fe train line runs from Guadalajara, to Sante Fe, to Denver and stops in Chicago. The same Mexicans that live in Chicago, guess what, live in Denver? I'm not a homer. I just moved here 8 months ago. But, as I told you, I travel the world. I'm not the authority by no means but I've seen things and places that most haven't seen ... yet. With that being said, Denver is liberal. It's more liberal than any place that I've lived. Dude, you can contain illegal substances here. Only other place like this is California. Now, is the state red? Most years, yes. So are many of our major cities - blue metros; red states. Not that it matters which way one leans. It's just a fact. Look at Atlanta, Charlotte, New Orleans, Vegas, St. Louis on so on. Like I said, tell me where you've lived, not visited for a weekend and we can have an honest discussion.

Keep in mind the fact that you live in one of the most liberal neighborhoods in Denver, let alone in Colorado or the Denver metro. That might color things a bit. You have been here for only eight months, and if you stay for a while longer I'd be curious to see if your view of things changes. I'm a Denver native, and with the exception of a few stints out of state for school, I've been here since conception. I know this place pretty well, and while there are very liberal neighborhoods scattered throughout the city, the metro area is much more conservative as a whole, as is the state. Those handful of liberal neighborhoods (and Boulder) feel like an airtight bubble of left-leaning libertarian excess in the middle of a sea of your average right-leaning middle-American way of life. Not unlike Atlanta, for example.

By the way, I've lived in a small Oregon college town, suburban St. Louis, and a small northern Indiana town about two hours outside of Chicago. And, of course, Denver (I went to college in Boulder). By my estimation, Denver is much more conservative than Oregon, a little more conservative than St. Louis, and less conservative than my rural Indiana town. I haven't spent a whole lot of time in Chicago, but my experience is that Chicago is not only considerably more liberal, but it is leagues ahead of Denver in many respects. I still prefer Denver, but I don't pretend that Denver is anything like Chicago.
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Old 03-09-2012, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
879 posts, read 1,676,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott5280 View Post
Denver is a liberal city; plain and simple. They have been voting consistantly for liberal dems. since the early 70's: When did this become a news flash? I believe there are only two working class districts within the city that have any significant republican voting blocks. Denver is also home to one of the highest percentage gay communities in the nation. home to a thriving medical marijuana industry, a strong recycling eco- minded population , racially mixed local politicians. Denver is laid back liberal not militant in your face like Boulder or Aspen.
Add to that Colorado voters will be deciding in November whether or not to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Whether or not that passes, even the fact that made it to the ballot is a testament to Coloradoans' "push the envelope" mentality. Could you ever imagine that happening in a state like Kansas or Missouri?
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