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View Poll Results: Which city do you like better to live or visit?
San Diego 133 64.56%
Houston 73 35.44%
Voters: 206. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-06-2012, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Sandy Eggo - Kensington
4,780 posts, read 10,504,972 times
Reputation: 2515

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Quote:
Originally Posted by borat4eva View Post
Ok, let's put it this way - SD is a touristy place, somewhere where you go from the UK and say "wow, California, let's have some fun. Who wants to go to the beach or to the zoo?". Houston on the other hand, is pretty much useless for tourism from the outside of US (that's my personal opinion). But its well known, particularly in Europe as the energy hub and medical centre. That's one of the top destinations for European professionals. Also, I know more people who know about Houston than about SD. Houston is y a megacity with impressive international image. I don't want to upset anyone here, but a lot of tourists g to San Diego for a day or weekend trip after visng LA. I like SD but I think Houston is more affordable and more interesting.
If Houston has such an international image then why ,despite being twice as big as SD, does SD attract close to double the amount of international tourists?

http://tinet.ita.doc.gov/outreachpag...and_Cities.pdf

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt
Houston is by far the superior big business city & center of culture.

The Port of Houston blows San Diego's away in both foreign & domestic trade.
Who cares? Actually, Houstonians do because there's not much else to brag about, is there?

And in 5,4,3,2,1........someone will throw in the part about it having the second most number of Fortune 500 company headquarters

 
Old 07-07-2012, 01:43 AM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,377 posts, read 7,676,186 times
Reputation: 4347
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurbanite View Post
If Houston has such an international image then why ,despite being twice as big as SD, does SD attract close to double the amount of international tourists?

http://tinet.ita.doc.gov/outreachpag...and_Cities.pdf


Who cares? Actually, Houstonians do because there's not much else to brag about, is there?

And in 5,4,3,2,1........someone will throw in the part about it having the second most number of Fortune 500 company headquarters
This is why people aren't to fond of many Californian posters.

Houston is twice the city SD is. More people visit SD because it's in California. Nothing more, nothing less. I like SD and would like to visit someday, however, It does not have more international importance than Houston...more visitors or not.

Oh, and in 5, 4, 3, 2, 1...The bragging about the beach, zoo, and weather will be mentioned..again.

Last edited by Mezter; 07-07-2012 at 02:42 AM..
 
Old 07-07-2012, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,377 posts, read 7,676,186 times
Reputation: 4347
I chose Houston. Better economy, Better schools, More Diverse, Better shopping, Close to the beach, Great suburbs, Cheap, etc.
 
Old 07-07-2012, 04:24 AM
 
840 posts, read 1,813,052 times
Reputation: 1124
I lived in San Diego for four years. Lived in Houston many, many times and am so GLAD to be back here in H-town.

I've had some fond memories and some cool jobs out in San Diego...but man, Houston as a city just BLOWS it away.

There is NO place to work in San Diego that is like the Texas Medical Center. I've been working in the Texas Medical Center for the past four years now...and the Med Center street life has a MUCH more purposeful dynamic than any I've experienced out in the supposed Navy-frat boy-filled "America's Finest City." It is refreshing to experience true URBAN street life here along Fannin St. when I walk to work or need to grab something to eat as opposed to those Kodak kiosk, whitebread San Diego tourist streets. It is FAR more organic urbanity to see tons of people sitting or strolling in front of Hermann in the shade along Fannin than to see people line up for the Whaley House in Old Town San Diego (eating lousy fake Mexican food).

Heck, even at night, when I walk to the transit center, the Texas Medical Center with the busy action of cops, ambulances, street people, medical staff, regular pedestrians around the myriad facilities has a lively vibe with a strange nocturnal purpose. Bit of sci-fi vibe...I will never get that in La Jolla or Uptown Hillcrest or some cliched SoCal walking district. I love my job and I love the Texas Medical Center. I love my 25 minute power walks after work to the transit center.

San Diego? Do you really like those random police CHECKPOINTS (hello...this is the USA not the old-style Soviet Union or Third Reich!) where the National City PD, Escondido PD, San Diego PD, San Diego Sheriffs stop EVERY VEHICLE along orange cones, asking for YOUR PAPERS? If you think that is right or just...then you are sheeple ready made for a quasi-fascist regime. These are NOT the announced DWI checkpoints. They happen randomly in the daytime on regular days.

Houston? Nope. We don't worry about checkpoints. HPD or the Constables or METRO cops...they stop cars on an individual basis, at least. Those California Fascist Police checkpoints are ILLEGAL in Texas, where apparently we love freedom more so. Traps are NOTHING compared to those Cali checkpoints.

Houston has a Theater District of utmost superior construction, quantity and quality. San Diego...is there such thing as culture there, aside from surfer? (Cowabunga, dude!)

San Diego has the larger, better known zoo...but the Houston Zoo is still regarded as a top 10.

Houston has many sorts of specialized nightlife districts that have drastically gotten more vibrant over the recent years (Rice Village, Richmond Avenue, Washington Ave, Downtown, White Oak St., the Montrose, Uptown/Galleria, Midtown, New Chinatown). They have a far greater range of street scales and street textures. And outside of those clusters, people are ALL OVER the place in Houston. Tons of bars/clubs/cool cafes outside of the entertainment clusters. I'd rather have this variety than the usual cliched tourist concentration format.

I love me some White Oak St in the Houston Heights. I enjoy that post-WW II neighborhood style nightlife area. Try and find a venue with CHARACTER like Fitzgerald's in San Diego. But San Diego feels comfy to be near Los Angeles (but won't admit it) and so its streets and plastic commercial structures, ahem, copy L.A.'s style (yet there's no actual grand Hollywood campiness in San Diego). Houston does its own thang...thank you.

San Diego has...Gas Lamp. Pacific Beach. Uptown/Hillcrest. There are a few other areas...but THE SIDEWALKS ALL LOOK THE SAME. Ditto with the buildings-to-sidewalk scale. In Houston we get everything from Gulf Coast palapas, fringe-city superhuge PATIO DECK BARS (you will not find something like DECK HAUS in San Diego or the beaches), bungalows, converted mini-Victorian mansions as cafes/bars (you don't really see that in San Diego, let alone other cities)...as well as traditional commercial urban structures thrown in for good measure. We have skinny sidewalks, we have wide sidewalks.
San Diego does have a few converted houses as bars/cafes...but the placement is rather predictable and not anywhere as jagged and interesting as Houston's plethora.

Having a brew or Italian soda outside on a wide sidewalk patio in Houston like that of Front Porch Pub, CoCo's or Cyclone Anaya's along W. Gray in Midtown, feels like a slice of slick SoCal street (then there's the Komodo Pub, a 4th Ward structural leftover letting us know we are still in H-town). And when they finish Phase III in Midtown soon...even sweeter. But just a bit further west on W. Gray...where we have the likes of W. Gray Cafe, Byzantio, Cecil's Pub...where do you find that street scape in San Diego or SoCal?

Yes, I notice the unique, subtle treasures of Houston that Anal Urban Snobs seem to overlook.

Houston is a TRUE mix-n-match of varying street styles. You won't see or experience the zany Fairview St. street structure or vibe in San Diego. I promise you that. I mean, Taft Street Coffee, for one. Sitting at Boheme Bar looking across the little street watching people eat al fresco at the utterly cool mini-mansion called Ziggy's Bar...that oddball configuration is only in Houston, man.

Kensington in San Diego is cool, I love it...but it looks like a smaller version of Uptown/Hillcrest in structure. Period. Ditto for University and such. San Diego simply does not have the varying street fabric like Houston. San Diego in its street texture is merely Los Angeles Lite (but better than that sun-baked purgatory known as Orange County).

And San Diego sprawl seems dead at night, compared to Houston sprawl. Broad SD nightlife transit traffic there is limited to the entertainment areas. In Houston...nightlife transit traffic is all over the place: Westheimer, Richmond, Bellaire, Bissonnet, Hillcroft, Fondren, Louisiana, Travis...so Houston all around feels "more happening" than San Diego.

Houston has FAR GREATER ethnic appeal. San Diego is mostly for whites with some allowance for the Asians around Convoy.

Gas Lamp in San Diego will forever have a tourist/Navy/Caucasian general appeal. You don't see the broad number of blacks and Latinos partying there.

Downtown Houston is where blacks, Latinos, hipsters as well as white business types can at least share it en masse. Gas Lamp is kinda Disney compared to downtown Houston...at least in downtown Houston, I feel like I'm in a sci-fi Blade Runner environment (which is not everyone's cup of tea, of course). The only things interesting to me in downtown San Diego are the Horton Plaza and Bassam Cafe (if it's still around). But apart from that...it's...touristy monotony. But to see the downtown Houston white hipsters at Dean's Credit/No Tsu Oh bar...then watching the hip-hoppa peeps walking around...you don't see that overall mixing in Portland...or San Diego.

Houston is regarded as one of the great restaurant cities. San Diego...not so much.

In Houston, you can find a HECK of a lot more Colombian, Salvadoran, Guatemalan and misc. Central American eateries. In San Diego, I knew of only one Salvadoran pupuseria, though I am sure there might be more (which goes to show you how powerful San Diego's anti-Latino vibe is).

In San Diego, we lived in dumpy apartments or had to constantly share crappy ranch homes with dead, dirt lawns. In West Houston, we now have a decent, cute remodeled house in a neighborhood with magnificent green lawns.

In San Diego metro...you mention you live anywhere in South Bay...you are automatically marked down on the socio-demographic scale out there (generally Mexicans, Filipinos and trailer park whites). I scoff at my Filipino ancestors who live in those crappy ranch homes in Chula Vista or Imperial Beach yet they seem to want BMWs and Lexuses parked in front. At least their Mexican neighbors don't have that materialism.

In Houston metro, you say you live in West Houston and its' just one of those things. It's a mix of multi-racial working-class, upwardly mobile to wealthy in checkerboard fashion...and while that's got its flaws...at least we can safely say San Diego is quite more segregated. And I think lesser of cities that are segregated, including my old home town Chicago.

Houston commands economic superiority in shipping, medical arts and energy...and increasingly manufacturing. San Diego has a more diverse economy...but like Dallas, Atlanta, Phoenix, et al...San Diego HAS to be diverse because it evidently needs more than tourism to survive (and San Diego doesn't have a monopoly on tourism and hi-tech).

Houston's general grocery shopping is in my view better than San Diego's. Ralph's and Von's in SoCal sucked bad in terms of choices. H-E-B, Super Randall's/Kroger's...much, much better variety.

Burgers? In-N-Out? Bah. Once you've Beck's Prime or Christian's Tailgate...you'll never consider In-N-Out as a burger shack again (unless you're a die hard "Cali Rules" type).

But Niederfrank's Ice Cream in National City...that's the best in-store ice cream anywhere. I give San Diego that.

I had a dry, chalky skin issue in San Diego. That dry skin issue had vanished upon returning to Houston. I guess my moisture regained balance because I don't get that dry skin issue even in Houston's cool winter months.

Had a memorable time, to be sure, in San Diego...lots of people I fondly remember...but deep down we knew that SoCal was no place to settle roots. Too many towns and metros too close together, competing for resources, surrounded by ocean, mountains and desert and that's not good in a socio-economic context. In Houston, we have far less of a water issue...an issue that is not that easy to square away in Southern California, for example. I feel a lot more comfy surrounded by greenery and trees rather than desert/mountains on one side, huge ocean on the other...

I dreamed of living in SoCal when I was a kid. But having lived there four years, experienced it; I don't even dream of visiting anymore. I probably will visit someday, but for the past four years, I have not yearned to go back. And I do not even think about moving back to San Diego. Life here in Houston is quite good, really good...with my large patio deck in the back, sipping home-blended mango slushees. I could never have that deck in S.D. unless I was something like a lawyer or conniving real estate guru.

Last edited by worldlyman; 07-07-2012 at 04:35 AM..
 
Old 07-07-2012, 06:44 AM
 
64 posts, read 127,423 times
Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by worldlyman View Post
I lived in San Diego for four years. Lived in Houston many, many times and am so GLAD to be back here in H-town.

I've had some fond memories and some cool jobs out in San Diego...but man, Houston as a city just BLOWS it away.

There is NO place to work in San Diego that is like the Texas Medical Center. I've been working in the Texas Medical Center for the past four years now...and the Med Center street life has a MUCH more purposeful dynamic than any I've experienced out in the supposed Navy-frat boy-filled "America's Finest City." It is refreshing to experience true URBAN street life here along Fannin St. when I walk to work or need to grab something to eat as opposed to those Kodak kiosk, whitebread San Diego tourist streets. It is FAR more organic urbanity to see tons of people sitting or strolling in front of Hermann in the shade along Fannin than to see people line up for the Whaley House in Old Town San Diego (eating lousy fake Mexican food).

Heck, even at night, when I walk to the transit center, the Texas Medical Center with the busy action of cops, ambulances, street people, medical staff, regular pedestrians around the myriad facilities has a lively vibe with a strange nocturnal purpose. Bit of sci-fi vibe...I will never get that in La Jolla or Uptown Hillcrest or some cliched SoCal walking district. I love my job and I love the Texas Medical Center. I love my 25 minute power walks after work to the transit center.

San Diego? Do you really like those random police CHECKPOINTS (hello...this is the USA not the old-style Soviet Union or Third Reich!) where the National City PD, Escondido PD, San Diego PD, San Diego Sheriffs stop EVERY VEHICLE along orange cones, asking for YOUR PAPERS? If you think that is right or just...then you are sheeple ready made for a quasi-fascist regime. These are NOT the announced DWI checkpoints. They happen randomly in the daytime on regular days.

Houston? Nope. We don't worry about checkpoints. HPD or the Constables or METRO cops...they stop cars on an individual basis, at least. Those California Fascist Police checkpoints are ILLEGAL in Texas, where apparently we love freedom more so. Traps are NOTHING compared to those Cali checkpoints.

Houston has a Theater District of utmost superior construction, quantity and quality. San Diego...is there such thing as culture there, aside from surfer? (Cowabunga, dude!)

San Diego has the larger, better known zoo...but the Houston Zoo is still regarded as a top 10.

Houston has many sorts of specialized nightlife districts that have drastically gotten more vibrant over the recent years (Rice Village, Richmond Avenue, Washington Ave, Downtown, White Oak St., the Montrose, Uptown/Galleria, Midtown, New Chinatown). They have a far greater range of street scales and street textures. And outside of those clusters, people are ALL OVER the place in Houston. Tons of bars/clubs/cool cafes outside of the entertainment clusters. I'd rather have this variety than the usual cliched tourist concentration format.

I love me some White Oak St in the Houston Heights. I enjoy that post-WW II neighborhood style nightlife area. Try and find a venue with CHARACTER like Fitzgerald's in San Diego. But San Diego feels comfy to be near Los Angeles (but won't admit it) and so its streets and plastic commercial structures, ahem, copy L.A.'s style (yet there's no actual grand Hollywood campiness in San Diego). Houston does its own thang...thank you.

San Diego has...Gas Lamp. Pacific Beach. Uptown/Hillbut THE SIDEWALKS ALL LOOK THE SAMEcrest. There are a few other areas.... Ditto with the buildings-to-sidewalk scale. In Houston we get everything from Gulf Coast palapas, fringe-city superhuge PATIO DECK BARS (you will not find something like DECK HAUS in San Diego or the beaches), bungalows, converted mini-Victorian mansions as cafes/bars (you don't really see that in San Diego, let alone other cities)...as well as traditional commercial urban structures thrown in for good measure. We have skinny sidewalks, we have wide sidewalks.
San Diego does have a few converted houses as bars/cafes...but the placement is rather predictable and not anywhere as jagged and interesting as Houston's plethora.

Having a brew or Italian soda outside on a wide sidewalk patio in Houston like that of Front Porch Pub, CoCo's or Cyclone Anaya's along W. Gray in Midtown, feels like a slice of slick SoCal street (then there's the Komodo Pub, a 4th Ward structural leftover letting us know we are still in H-town). And when they finish Phase III in Midtown soon...even sweeter. But just a bit further west on W. Gray...where we have the likes of W. Gray Cafe, Byzantio, Cecil's Pub...where do you find that street scape in San Diego or SoCal?

Yes, I notice the unique, subtle treasures of Houston that Anal Urban Snobs seem to overlook.

Houston is a TRUE mix-n-match of varying street styles. You won't see or experience the zany Fairview St. street structure or vibe in San Diego. I promise you that. I mean, Taft Street Coffee, for one. Sitting at Boheme Bar looking across the little street watching people eat al fresco at the utterly cool mini-mansion called Ziggy's Bar...that oddball configuration is only in Houston, man.

Kensington in San Diego is cool, I love it...but it looks like a smaller version of Uptown/Hillcrest in structure. Period. Ditto for University and such. San Diego simply does not have the varying street fabric like Houston. San Diego in its street texture is merely Los Angeles Lite (but better than that sun-baked purgatory known as Orange County).

And San Diego sprawl seems dead at night, compared to Houston sprawl. Broad SD nightlife transit traffic there is limited to the entertainment areas. In Houston...nightlife transit traffic is all over the place: Westheimer, Richmond, Bellaire, Bissonnet, Hillcroft, Fondren, Louisiana, Travis...so Houston all around feels "more happening" than San Diego.

Houston has FAR GREATER ethnic appeal. San Diego is mostly for whites with some allowance for the Asians around Convoy.

Gas Lamp in San Diego will forever have a tourist/Navy/Caucasian general appeal. You don't see the broad number of blacks and Latinos partying there.

Downtown Houston is where blacks, Latinos, hipsters as well as white business types can at least share it en masse. Gas Lamp is kinda Disney compared to downtown Houston...at least in downtown Houston, I feel like I'm in a sci-fi Blade Runner environment (which is not everyone's cup of tea, of course). The only things interesting to me in downtown San Diego are the Horton Plaza and Bassam Cafe (if it's still around). But apart from that...it's...touristy monotony. But to see the downtown Houston white hipsters at Dean's Credit/No Tsu Oh bar...then watching the hip-hoppa peeps walking around...you don't see that overall mixing in Portland...or San Diego.

Houston is regarded as one of the great restaurant cities. San Diego...not so much.

In Houston, you can find a HECK of a lot more Colombian, Salvadoran, Guatemalan and misc. Central American eateries. In San Diego, I knew of only one Salvadoran pupuseria, though I am sure there might be more (which goes to show you how powerful San Diego's anti-Latino vibe is).

In San Diego, we lived in dumpy apartments or had to constantly share crappy ranch homes with dead, dirt lawns. In West Houston, we now have a decent, cute remodeled house in a neighborhood with magnificent green lawns.

In San Diego metro...you mention you live anywhere in South Bay...you are automatically marked down on the socio-demographic scale out there (generally Mexicans, Filipinos and trailer park whites). I scoff at my Filipino ancestors who live in those crappy ranch homes in Chula Vista or Imperial Beach yet they seem to want BMWs and Lexuses parked in front. At least their Mexican neighbors don't have that materialism.

In Houston metro, you say you live in West Houston and its' just one of those things. It's a mix of multi-racial working-class, upwardly mobile to wealthy in checkerboard fashion...and while that's got its flaws...at least we can safely say San Diego is quite more segregated. And I think lesser of cities that are segregated, including my old home town Chicago.

Houston commands economic superiority in shipping, medical arts and energy...and increasingly manufacturing. San Diego has a more diverse economy...but like Dallas, Atlanta, Phoenix, et al...San Diego HAS to be diverse because it evidently needs more than tourism to survive (and San Diego doesn't have a monopoly on tourism and hi-tech).

Houston's general grocery shopping is in my view better than San Diego's. Ralph's and Von's in SoCal sucked bad in terms of choices. H-E-B, Super Randall's/Kroger's...much, much better variety.

Burgers? In-N-Out? Bah. Once you've Beck's Prime or Christian's Tailgate...you'll never consider In-N-Out as a burger shack again (unless you're a die hard "Cali Rules" type).

But Niederfrank's Ice Cream in National City...that's the best in-store ice cream anywhere. I give San Diego that.

I had a dry, chalky skin issue in San Diego. That dry skin issue had vanished upon returning to Houston. I guess my moisture regained balance because I don't get that dry skin issue even in Houston's cool winter months.

Had a memorable time, to be sure, in San Diego...lots of people I fondly remember...but deep down we knew that SoCal was no place to settle roots. Too many towns and metros too close together, competing for resources, surrounded by ocean, mountains and desert and that's not good in a socio-economic context. In Houston, we have far less of a water issue...an issue that is not that easy to square away in Southern California, for example. I feel a lot more comfy surrounded by greenery and trees rather than desert/mountains on one side, huge ocean on the other...

I dreamed of living in SoCal when I was a kid. But having lived there four years, experienced it; I don't even dream of visiting anymore. I probably will visit someday, but for the past four years, I have not yearned to go back. And I do not even think about moving back to San Diego. Life here in Houston is quite good, really good...with my large patio deck in the back, sipping home-blended mango slushees. I could never have that deck in S.D. unless I was something like a lawyer or conniving real estate guru.
Do you really think for one second people are going to believe this? Do you live in a fantasy world? Houston by far is less urban and less walkable and less happening on every measure possible than San Diego, and oh yeah that whole sidewalk thing you threw in there has to do with a city being mature and developed, just because Houston has patches of sidewalk next to unpaved grass trails doesn't make it more varying in or cool its called undeveloped/non pedestrian friendly, look I'm sure Houston has some sort of appeal other than cheap land and jobs but seriously trying to falsely claim Houston as this urban oasis is absolutely ridiculous, you even rave that Houston has more "happening" sprawl whatever that's suppose to mean.
 
Old 07-07-2012, 07:06 AM
 
64 posts, read 127,423 times
Reputation: 48
People of city data this is what wordlyman was trying to say was happening and urban, I can literally count how many people I saw in that video on both hands

Downtown Houston Texas - YouTube

Now compare that to this very short min and a half video which is not even including the waterfront and gaslamp district which are full of pedestrians and it still has at least 10X more people than the 5 min video of Houston this is how much of a FAILED argument worldlyman's post was

San Diego - Driving Around Downtown.MOD - YouTube
 
Old 07-07-2012, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Chicago (from pittsburgh)
3,678 posts, read 4,356,559 times
Reputation: 2852
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowdivide View Post
Do you really think for one second people are going to believe this? .
I couldn't even attempt to read that novel.
 
Old 07-07-2012, 12:31 PM
 
1,113 posts, read 1,303,675 times
Reputation: 756
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowdivide View Post
Do you really think for one second people are going to believe this? Do you live in a fantasy world? Houston by far is less urban and less walkable and less happening on every measure possible than San Diego, and oh yeah that whole sidewalk thing you threw in there has to do with a city being mature and developed, just because Houston has patches of sidewalk next to unpaved grass trails doesn't make it more varying in or cool its called undeveloped/non pedestrian friendly, look I'm sure Houston has some sort of appeal other than cheap land and jobs but seriously trying to falsely claim Houston as this urban oasis is absolutely ridiculous, you even rave that Houston has more "happening" sprawl whatever that's suppose to mean.
I agree: I lived in Dallas for one year and I actually visited Houston several times.
Houston is just SPRAWL AND POLLUTION
It lacks a real urban core and its lifeless downtown is just an agglomerate of dull buildings: IMHO Houston is the epitome and the quintessence of what is wrong with flyover America.
Yes, I know that Greater San Diego is quite spread out: but it has several (beautiful) urban neighbourhoods and towns... and an amazing natural scenery: just think about the coastline...
Texas may offer more job opportunities (and lower wages), but that's all.
Honestly I don't miss the Lone Star State at all: as far as my experience is concerned, there is NOT quality of life in Texas.
 
Old 07-07-2012, 05:01 PM
 
43 posts, read 77,438 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurbanite View Post
If Houston has such an international image then why ,despite being twice as big as SD, does SD attract close to double the amount of international tourists?

http://tinet.ita.doc.gov/outreachpag...and_Cities.pdf
As I said SD is for tourists and Houston is for business and living.
 
Old 07-08-2012, 01:37 AM
 
1,113 posts, read 1,303,675 times
Reputation: 756
Quote:
Originally Posted by borat4eva View Post
As I said SD is for tourists and Houston is for business and living.
Yes, Texas is for living... badly
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