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View Poll Results: Best food city after NYC?
Los Angeles 46 22.44%
Chicago 53 25.85%
Washington DC 5 2.44%
San Francisco/Bay Area 26 12.68%
Dallas-Fort Worth 5 2.44%
Philadelphia 25 12.20%
Houston 18 8.78%
Atlanta 6 2.93%
Miami 7 3.41%
Boston 4 1.95%
Other 10 4.88%
Voters: 205. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-16-2012, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,582,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
What food does SF really do better than LA?

I think Mexican/Latino is unquestionably better in LA. Also, while most people think of great asian food with SF, LA has just as many if not more great spots.

So what area does SF beat LA, I'm curious cause I keep hearing it but I never noticed it though I lived in LA so I got to sample more food there.
Indian food, I believe...? Don't really know.
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:23 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,302,093 times
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This poll does not inquire into the best "fine dining". Or the best "ethnic dining". Or even "dining".

No, it' asking about the best FOOD. A global characterization about the stuff which we all love and sustains all our lives. But of course, we can all take it for granted the best FOOD in all of America exists in only New York City. I can't imagine why some folks might question that assumption. The fact anybody does NOT have a problem with that premise is simply RIDICULOUS.

In the spirit of the Season, I call Shenanigans.

Yeah, I said it.
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:29 PM
 
637 posts, read 746,010 times
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Again, why doesn't the thread question just get answered?

You know what's larger shenanigans? Why the SF and LA posters never debate anything with each other anymore, under the assumption that California now is one city. They aren't the same entity, nor should they be looked at as the same entity.

Again, I pose this question: what does SF have that LA doesn't? I can't think of one good thing that SF has over LA, yet SF is lauded while LA is chastized. That's preposterous!
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
9,832 posts, read 7,331,648 times
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I submit that L.A. is the top-to-bottom "food city" in the U.S. for a few big reasons.

Amongst foodies (who bless their hearts, they care about food more than reputation), L.A. is generally considered the best city in the U.S. for Mexican (in various styles), Japanese, Korean, Thai, Vietnamese. It usually comes out on top for Chinese food (specifically in the SGV) though that isn't as much of a slam dunk. Those are some heavy hitting cuisines right there. It's also very strong in Jewish delis (Langer's, Brent's), Peruvian cuisine, central American, Persian (arguably tops in the nation here too), burgers (SoCal is pretty much the burger capital, where many big chains got their start), donuts, and hot dogs too. It has the most farmers markets of any major city in the U.S., fresh produce abound all year long. It's a CSA of 18 million people, meaning you get quantity to go with quality.

Countless food trends have started here (the food truck craze being the most recent). L.A.'s only slight weakness is in high-end fare, though it still has plenty of options there, and is at worst #4 in the U.S. in that category. For day to day eating, it's #1 IMO.

A very close second would by San Francisco, followed by a city that isn't included in this poll.

Last edited by RaymondChandlerLives; 03-16-2012 at 04:45 PM..
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,582,779 times
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In LA, I walk to this huge Farmer's Market. Has never failed to blow every guest away with its size and scope.

Hollywood Farmers Market - Hollywood - Los Angeles, CA

Wouldn't you know it, but Google Maps shot their 45 degree satellite images on a Sunday, so you can check it out: Google Maps

It occupies all of Selma and Ivar Streets between Cahuenga, Vine, Hollywood and Sunset.

It is one of countless farmer's markets in the city, I'm willing to bet there is a large market open every single day of the week in the LA area (Other than the Farmer's Market by the Grove).
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:41 PM
 
Location: In the heights
20,175 posts, read 21,784,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
What food does SF really do better than LA?

I think Mexican/Latino is unquestionably better in LA. Also, while most people think of great asian food with SF, LA has just as many if not more great spots.

So what area does SF beat LA, I'm curious cause I keep hearing it but I never noticed it though I lived in LA so I got to sample more food there.
I feel like the overall quality of any restaurant in the Bay Area is generally higher than that of Los Angeles which has a huge proliferation of mostly mediocre to bad chains selling slop. However, since Los Angeles is much larger than the Bay Area, it ends up balancing things out with just the sheer quantity of varied and delicious food. The Bay Area also gets pretty top marks for extremely expensive, but great food as per guides like Michelin and Zagat. SF also has a history of notable chefs and restaurants that have dramatically influenced cuisine around the world. On a more subjective note, I feel that the Bay Area has more distinctive regional food than LA does such as cioppino, the mission burrito, sourdough bread, and napa valley wine (not so much rice-o-roni).

In the end though, I think the two are pretty evenly matched right now.

Also, I think Honolulu probably deserves a mention due to how distinct its own cuisine is as well as an emphasis on catering to tourists from far away who would be willing to plunk down a good amount for food while on vacation.
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:41 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,302,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
In LA, I walk to this huge Farmer's Market. Has never failed to blow every guest away with its size and scope.

Hollywood Farmers Market - Hollywood - Los Angeles, CA

Wouldn't you know it, but Google Maps shot their 45 degree satellite images on a Sunday, so you can check it out: Google Maps

It occupies all of Selma and Ivar Streets between Cahuenga, Vine, Hollywood and Sunset.

It is one of countless farmer's markets in the city, I'm willing to bet there is a large market open every single day (Other than the Farmer's Market by the Grove).
You can also grow your own year-round vegetable garden here. Growing, you know, food.
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,582,779 times
Reputation: 3941
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
I feel like the overall quality of any restaurant in the Bay Area is generally higher than that of Los Angeles which has a huge proliferation of mostly mediocre to bad chains selling slop. However, since Los Angeles is much larger than the Bay Area, it ends up balancing things out with just the sheer quantity of varied and delicious food. The Bay Area also gets pretty top marks for extremely expensive, but great food as per guides like Michelin and Zagat. SF also has a history of notable chefs and restaurants that have dramatically influenced cuisine around the world. On a more subjective note, I feel that the Bay Area has more distinctive regional food than LA does such as cioppino, the mission burrito, sourdough bread, and napa valley wine (not so much rice-o-roni).

In the end though, I think the two are pretty evenly matched right now.
In the Valley, South LA and of course OC I guess this is true, but in my experience there are vastly more locally owned restaurants in LA than there are chains. Plus other than in SF, there are just as many of these exact same chains in places like San Leandro, Richmond, Oakland, etc.
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:47 PM
 
637 posts, read 746,010 times
Reputation: 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
I submit that L.A. is the top-to-bottom "food city" in the U.S. for a few big reasons.

Amongst foodies (who bless their hearts, they care about food more than reputation), L.A. is generally considered the best city in the U.S. for Mexican (in various styles), Japanese, Korean, Thai, Vietnamese. It usually comes out on top for Chinese food (specifically in the SGV) though that isn't as much of a slam dunk. Those are some heavy hitting cuisines right there. It's also very strong in Jewish delis (Langer's, Brent's), Peruvian cuisine, central American, Persian (arguably tops in the nation here too), burgers (SoCal is pretty much the burger capital, where many big chains got their start), donuts, and hot dogs too. It has the most farmers markets of any major city in the U.S., fresh produce abound all year long. It's a CSA of 18 million people, meaning you get quantity to go with quality.

Countless food trends have started here (the food truck craze being the most recent). L.A.'s only slight weakness is in high-end fare, though it still has plenty of options there, and is at worst #4 in the U.S. in that category. For day to day eating, it's #1 IMO.
There, I actually like that response because its well thought out and isn't a knee-jerk reaction. I can see where that's the case, though there are plenty of cuisines in other cities that aren't as adequately represented in LA (various West African cuisines, Caribbean cuisines, Eastern European food, etc.)

Quote:
A very close second would San Francisco, followed by a city that isn't included in this poll.
What city would that be? San Diego?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nslander View Post
You can also grow your own year-round vegetable garden here. Growing, you know, food.
People grow their own food in the Northeast as well. It's not solely a California thing. There are a box of grapes next to me that says "Product of New York" on them...
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:50 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,302,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huge Foodie 215 View Post
People grow their own food in the Northeast as well. It's not solely a California thing. There are a box of grapes next to me that says "Product of New York" on them...
You ignored "year-round". It goes to availability. Which is greater here.
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