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Old 03-26-2012, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Denver
9,067 posts, read 15,492,134 times
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IMHO Seattle is definitely more weird and quirky than Denver. You will find an abundance of insular homebodies up there, whereas Denver is more of an outdoor and sports town. Also, Denver summers are very hot and dry.

However, I think one can be themselves in either city. I would recommend that you find a job first then move.
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Old 03-26-2012, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Spokane, WA
12,845 posts, read 23,261,350 times
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OP, nothing in your post is screaming Seattle to me, so for me, winner by default is Denver.

I'm not sure why you don't think you could afford to live somewhere like Georgetown, it's not particularly expensive (no moreso than Seattle, for example). Idaho Springs and its Clear Creek County ilk are not expensive by any stretch, and if you think you need to be around year-round millionaires, why not consider wife working for the rich in Aspen, Vail, or Breckenridge? (some who ARE there year-round)

Another idea would be Evergreen (in the foothills w/green), or somewhere down in metro like Golden, if being near the city is a must.
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Old 03-26-2012, 01:06 PM
 
1,443 posts, read 2,849,313 times
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This person needs location, in his case I wouldn't recommend waiting for a job before moving.

I would concur with vegaspilgrim, from the OP's post his heart is obviously in Seattle but it would seem like he was trying to talk himself into trying to like Denver as much. Also, Colorado isn't hugely different from Texas or Arizona, which he hates.

Even if he's conservative I think he'll be fine because while Seattleites are overwhelmingly liberal, they're not annoyingly so. At least not as much as other places (i.e. SF, the Northeast.) They're also kind of bitter, so he'll fit in perfectly.
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Old 03-26-2012, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
1,309 posts, read 2,270,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mach50 View Post
IMHO Seattle is definitely more weird and quirky than Denver. You will find an abundance of insular homebodies up there, whereas Denver is more of an outdoor and sports town. Also, Denver summers are very hot and dry.

However, I think one can be themselves in either city. I would recommend that you find a job first then move.
Compared to Seattle, true. But a Denver summer is still orders of magnitude better than Phoenix, Texas and the Eastern Seaboard, IMO. I loved Colorado summers, but I also visited Seattle in July and it was amazing too.

I think there are several indicators that Seattle is a better fit.

1) The OP specifically mentions loving the ocean, but seems ambivalent about sunshine.

2) The OP and his wife are self-proclaimed homebodies, so they probably wouldn't be taking too much advantage of the outdoor activities the Denver area offers.

3) While Denver may have a lower COL, those cute Victorians in Denver proper are not going to run cheap, so that becomes a wash.
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Old 03-26-2012, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Prague
1,975 posts, read 2,855,592 times
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Like you, I've lived all over. I grew up in New England (NH). We're tired of moving around and have been looking for our "final destination" for a while now. Seattle is tops on my list but some friends have convinced me to at least visit Denver. I've been to CO, but never spent any time in Denver. My cousins are also from NH and spent some time last summer visiting both Seattle and Denver. Their dream was to visit CO and they finally did it last year.

Let me throw an intangible out there to consider; where will you feel at home? Some people are at home wherever they hang their hat. Some people are not. My totally unscientific observations are that people from New England move to a lot of places, but many never quite feel like they are home. There is something just a little off with everywhere they move. New England has a strong personality in both a good and bad way. I think it's embedded in people from the area. This describes me. I've lived in some really nice places. I still do. I've never gotten that "I'm home" feeling elsewhere. That is a major reason why I like Seattle. I tend to like the western USA better than back east, and Seattle is the only place I've been out west that gives me that "I'm home" feeling. 4 other family members have visited Seattle and say the same thing. My cousins had great expectations for Denver, but their favorite places ended up being Mukilteo (a little north of Seattle) and Spokane.

I'll be making a visit to Denver too this year, but I can tell you from my own experiences that there is a difference between living in a place that just "checks the boxes" and a place that feels comfortable to you. You have to check some boxes (like employment), but try going with your gut too. Washington comes across to me as being different yet familiar at the same time. I suspect that when I visit Denver I will see it the same way as many other places I've lived. It will check a lot of boxes but there will be one little thing missing....that feeling of being home.

Maybe I missed it in your post, but it kinda sounds like you are a good fit for New England. Your political views are also a good match for my home state of NH. Live Free or Die! We might be a small state, but we have the best damn motto there is.
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Old 03-26-2012, 03:31 PM
 
159 posts, read 361,569 times
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Originally Posted by Seacove View Post
You should also think about what you're going to do for a job. If your wife is a nanny and you are a newspaper reporter by trade - have you ever actually written for a newspaper? Have you ever had the job you were educated for?
Twice -- both before and after graduate school. But yes, I know they're tanking. The salary of my second position was two thirds of what it was at the first. Same region, same hours, far less pay.

At the moment, I'm just looking to get my foot in the door. My wife's experience and education level makes her a hot commodity as a nanny. The reality of our family life is that, for the foreseeable future, she is going to be the primary bread-winner.

If I could get anything that would earn even approaching 30k, I'd move up there immediately so we would have a foothold. It would suck being away from her for 7 months (and 30k is a pittance, but given my experiences with newspapers thus far, that's the best I can expect), but those are the realities we face. We are desperate to escape, so any rock I can cling to at this point would be a saving grace.

Also, no, I've never had a job in what I majored in . But the museum business is doing just as badly as newspapers are right now, given their requirement for large donations in order to stay above water. When nobody feels like being philanthropic, they struggle.
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Old 03-26-2012, 03:50 PM
 
159 posts, read 361,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarawayDJ View Post
Maybe I missed it in your post, but it kinda sounds like you are a good fit for New England. Your political views are also a good match for my home state of NH. Live Free or Die! We might be a small state, but we have the best damn motto there is.
I've spent a lot of time living in New England, actually. Not a lifetime, mind you, but more than anywhere else. I was born in RI, lived in Brunswick, ME for a while as a little kid, did my undergraduate at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, lived in Kennebunk for my first job out of college, and then eventually moved back to Maine after I got my MA.

One thing that I came to realize about New England was that, while I liked a lot of elements about the place, there were two extremely critical pieces missing which, for some reason, became very important to me:

1) If you are living anywhere other than on top of the mountains, you cannot see them. The horizon in most places is so densely populated with trees, and the mountains are so short, that they don't offer any kind of skyline view. In fact, like almost all of the eastern half of the United States, there is nothing to see in the sky.

When I drove past the Rockies or Shasta or Rainier, I was utterly struck by how these vast peaks filled the sky, could be seen for miles around (when it was clear, of course), and I felt like I almost changed my entire perspective about where I was. In New England, people always talk about how being close to the beach is so important to them. But I was finding that, even living in Kennebunk, my glimpses of the water on my normal circuit were rare and fleeting at best. Basically, what is the point of living next to the ocean if you never see it?

But with true mountains, as long as the sky is empty, they are always there, and I think there is some kind of power and value in visually refreshing that knowledge wit some frequency. 'Yes, that physical beauty is still there, and you don't have to hop in a car to go see it.'

2) I was starting to feel like New England was 'played out' for me. Yes, I haven't seen every square inch of the place, but my father's family has always stayed there, and we were in Mass or Maine or New Hampshire at least once (and often more frequently than that) a year while I was growing up. My parents are big car travellers (which is probably why I've turned into one too) and big believers in taking in all an area can offer. So whereas 'adventure awaits' in places like Denver and Seattle, it doesn't really offer the same kind of promise in New England. I've done the cape and the islands. I've done the White Mountains. I've done Connecticut (to death) and western MA.

Now, again, it's not fair to claim I've seen every little detail, but things have become so familiar. Maybe, as time passes, I will long for that familiarity again. But at the present, I find it almost claustrophobic. And it's not that I hate New England. I love the people there; love their chilly, frosty 'puritan' personalities; love the weather; love the coast; love the mountains; love the sports. I adore the place. But I have a wanderlust in me that is pulling me in other directions. It's like Frodo from The Lord of the Rings -- he felt the Shire quite ideal up to his fiftieth birthday, but then the desire to travel beyond the boundaries of the old familiar paths became stronger. That's kind of what I have been hit with.
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Old 03-26-2012, 03:51 PM
 
151 posts, read 476,273 times
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I would have to agree with David. I did skip to the stars, but from the way I interpret your pros and cons, Denver seems to be what leads the race.

I thought I was one where home was wherever I "hang my hat", but I am starting to think for me, that is not the case.

Oh, and the Seattle Paper here is pretty small (for what I am used to) so if you do get hired on, you may want to practice reducing your word count. - *Kidding of course
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Old 03-26-2012, 03:55 PM
 
159 posts, read 361,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy416 View Post
I would have to agree with David. I did skip to the stars, but from the way I interpret your pros and cons, Denver seems to be what leads the race.

I thought I was one where home was wherever I "hang my hat", but I am starting to think for me, that is not the case.

Oh, and the Seattle Paper here is pretty small (for what I am used to) so if you do get hired on, you may want to practice reducing your word count. - *Kidding of course
Oh don't worry. Most articles are generally limited to 600 - 700 words, and I keep them at that. Forum posts aren't generally so restricted, so I can 'go to town,' as it were.
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Old 03-26-2012, 04:02 PM
 
151 posts, read 476,273 times
Reputation: 80
My attempt at humor, not intended to offend, so I hope it didn’t. Actually having a bit more substance to the Times here wouldn’t be a bad thing. Except it is very techie here, so print seems to be fading here more so, and it wouldn’t surprise me if the Times was in worse shape than CO prints.
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