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Old 03-26-2012, 04:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy416 View Post
My attempt at humor, not intended to offend, so I hope it didn’t. Actually having a bit more substance to the Times here wouldn’t be a bad thing. Except it is very techie here, so print seems to be fading here more so, and it wouldn’t surprise me if the Times was in worse shape than CO prints.
It wouldn't shock me. It was a job I fell into because I knew how to write, and because my degrees were in an industry that was also struggling. I don't have any great love for newspaper work, but my skillset is definitely in the written word and/or editing of some sort.
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Old 03-26-2012, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Prague
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShrikeArghast View Post
I've spent a lot of time living in New England, actually. Not a lifetime, mind you, but more than anywhere else. I was born in RI, lived in Brunswick, ME for a while as a little kid, did my undergraduate at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, lived in Kennebunk for my first job out of college, and then eventually moved back to Maine after I got my MA.

One thing that I came to realize about New England was that, while I liked a lot of elements about the place, there were two extremely critical pieces missing which, for some reason, became very important to me:

1) If you are living anywhere other than on top of the mountains, you cannot see them. The horizon in most places is so densely populated with trees, and the mountains are so short, that they don't offer any kind of skyline view. In fact, like almost all of the eastern half of the United States, there is nothing to see in the sky.

When I drove past the Rockies or Shasta or Rainier, I was utterly struck by how these vast peaks filled the sky, could be seen for miles around (when it was clear, of course), and I felt like I almost changed my entire perspective about where I was. In New England, people always talk about how being close to the beach is so important to them. But I was finding that, even living in Kennebunk, my glimpses of the water on my normal circuit were rare and fleeting at best. Basically, what is the point of living next to the ocean if you never see it?

But with true mountains, as long as the sky is empty, they are always there, and I think there is some kind of power and value in visually refreshing that knowledge wit some frequency. 'Yes, that physical beauty is still there, and you don't have to hop in a car to go see it.'

2) I was starting to feel like New England was 'played out' for me. Yes, I haven't seen every square inch of the place, but my father's family has always stayed there, and we were in Mass or Maine or New Hampshire at least once (and often more frequently than that) a year while I was growing up. My parents are big car travellers (which is probably why I've turned into one too) and big believers in taking in all an area can offer. So whereas 'adventure awaits' in places like Denver and Seattle, it doesn't really offer the same kind of promise in New England. I've done the cape and the islands. I've done the White Mountains. I've done Connecticut (to death) and western MA.

Now, again, it's not fair to claim I've seen every little detail, but things have become so familiar. Maybe, as time passes, I will long for that familiarity again. But at the present, I find it almost claustrophobic. And it's not that I hate New England. I love the people there; love their chilly, frosty 'puritan' personalities; love the weather; love the coast; love the mountains; love the sports. I adore the place. But I have a wanderlust in me that is pulling me in other directions. It's like Frodo from The Lord of the Rings -- he felt the Shire quite ideal up to his fiftieth birthday, but then the desire to travel beyond the boundaries of the old familiar paths became stronger. That's kind of what I have been hit with.
Fair enough. Like I said, I prefer the west myself. The lack of dense vegetation in the west (generally speaking) does allow for some sweeping vistas that you don't see in New England. I found the height of the mountains to be more apparent in the Cascades, and less apparent in the Rockies (except for a few areas). What do I mean by that? An 11,000 ft peak when viewed from a road that is at 8,000 ft only looks like a 3,000 ft peak. I remember driving in some parts of the Rockies thinking how they didn't look bigger than the White Mountains. I knew they were, and if the road was a few thousand feet less in elevation they would be awe inspiring. Some parts are amazing though.

Please update this thread when all is said and done and you have decided. My trip to Denver will probably come this fall. I don't know if I can live away from the ocean, but my friends are convinced they found the best thing since peanut butter there.
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Old 03-26-2012, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
12,851 posts, read 23,328,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarawayDJ View Post
I'll be making a visit to Denver too this year, but I can tell you from my own experiences that there is a difference between living in a place that just "checks the boxes" and a place that feels comfortable to you. You have to check some boxes (like employment), but try going with your gut too. Washington comes across to me as being different yet familiar at the same time. I suspect that when I visit Denver I will see it the same way as many other places I've lived. It will check a lot of boxes but there will be one little thing missing....that feeling of being home.
This is what Denver is for me: checks all the boxes, but doesn't feel like home. I wouldn't be surprised if you or others come to the same conclusion.
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Old 03-26-2012, 05:13 PM
 
159 posts, read 362,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarawayDJ View Post
Fair enough. Like I said, I prefer the west myself. The lack of dense vegetation in the west (generally speaking) does allow for some sweeping vistas that you don't see in New England. I found the height of the mountains to be more apparent in the Cascades, and less apparent in the Rockies (except for a few areas). What do I mean by that? An 11,000 ft peak when viewed from a road that is at 8,000 ft only looks like a 3,000 ft peak. I remember driving in some parts of the Rockies thinking how they didn't look bigger than the White Mountains. I knew they were, and if the road was a few thousand feet less in elevation they would be awe inspiring. Some parts are amazing though.

Please update this thread when all is said and done and you have decided. My trip to Denver will probably come this fall. I don't know if I can live away from the ocean, but my friends are convinced they found the best thing since peanut butter there.
I've been to Denver twice, though both times obviously in passing (and, before I forget, you are totally right about the local relief regarding the Cascades/Rockies. The tallest Rockies are 14,000 foot peaks that, at best, rise out of a 6,000 foot landscape, but often are built on the shoulders of 8-10k foot lesser peaks. The Cascades, by comparison, are at best 8,000 feet [other than the volcanoes], but soar out of foothills at sea level. The volcanoes themselves are something else entirely, Rainier being the perfect example as the most topograhpically prominent mountain in the lower 48) and I definitely can see what draws people to the place.

Last time we were there in November, we arrived right after a cold front had gone through, and the sky was this tangled mess of dark clouds, being whipped around by an icy 40 MPH wind. Brief shafts of sunlight would sear they way through the murk to momentarily spotlight a mountain's peak or the top of a couple of skyscrapers, then vanish like somebody had extinguished a flashlight. Drama isn't dramatic enough a word for it.

But, yeah, there are a lot of appealing things about the place. I just don't know that it's more appealing than Seattle. Equally? Perhaps. But strong enough to cause you to move from one to the other? I dunno. As an outsider looking in, I think both places are sitting on the scales and showing about equal weight.

Last edited by ShrikeArghast; 03-26-2012 at 05:34 PM..
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Old 03-26-2012, 05:16 PM
 
Location: IN
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The Pacific Northwest is a much better fit overall for displaced New Englanders. That is where I would go over Denver.
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Old 03-26-2012, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Greater Seattle, WA Metro Area
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I lived in Denver for 4 years and met my husband there. It's a great city! My husband spent his formative years there and we still have family there. We now live in Seattle after 12 years in Texas (mostly Austin) in between. Husband's family is mostly from New England so have spent time there as well. Just giving you where my perspective is coming from...

A few comments...
1) Traffic is just as bad if not worse in Denver than Seattle esp in the Denver-Boulder corridor. Good public transport options in both.
2) Turn east and Denver is just any other ugly, brown city! Seattle is pretty everywhere you look! Breathtaking gorgeous, green plus mtns AND water views.
3) The pollution in Denver in the winter is atrocious. Brown cloud anyone? I lived in Green Mtn (west of Denver off of 6th Ave) and looked down on the brown cloud for many months a year. The pollution just sits on the Platte River. Ugh. Seattle has very clean air and water.
4) Better weather in Denver. No contest here...but can get really hot in the summer. Don't need to own AC in Seattle...most don't. In Denver it's getting to be a must. More sun in Denver but waayyy colder...but I would probably still pick Denver for the sun 300 days a year.
5) Denver better situated for air travel to wherever, esp if you have family on the East Coast. Seattle is wayyyy up in the corner of the puzzle.
6) Seattle better situated for incredible day trips - San Juans, BC, Oregon, Idaho.
7) Seattle has mtns and water within a half hour. I think the Cascades are far more accessible for a quick hike than the Rockies personally. I lived in Green Mtn in Denver so had easy accessibility...if you live somewhere like Evergreen you would too. But here living on the Eastside, I can ski within 40 minutes, hike within 10 and be on the lake within either 1 minute or 5 minutes depending on which of 3 lakes I am choosing from. So many options, so little time.
8) Skiing is better in Denver in general except it's way more expensive and the traffic up and down I-70 is just plain hellish during ski season. Now I have had days at both Crystal and Alpental that rival some great days at Mary Jane and Copper...but in general...CO has those bluebird days more often
9) Seattle has just as many charming neighborhoods as Denver. You just have to know where to look. and the charming neighborhoods are pretty expensive in both.
10) Seattle's economy is far more robust than Denver's. Every time my husband has received job offers back in Denver they have been significantly less than others. Last time he was offered $30K more in Austin TX than in Denver for the same job...and Austin is a lot less expensive.
11) Denver might make you more comfortable politically but I am pretty conservative and I don't mind living here at all. In fact I find it pretty interesting.
12) Denver has professional hockey and basketball. Big Av's fan here...really missing hockey.
13) Living on the West Coast might provide you with a much richer life experience than living in Denver. Plus a good contrast to where you have been before. By that I mean ferries and neat islands to visit on weekends. Pike Place Market, coffee houses, seafood...there is a real identity here.
14) I don't think either place has great BBQ or beef. That's what TX is for!!

Upside is that either place is a great choice!! Good luck and let us know where you end up!
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Old 03-26-2012, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Greater Seattle, WA Metro Area
1,938 posts, read 5,660,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShrikeArghast View Post
It wouldn't shock me. It was a job I fell into because I knew how to write, and because my degrees were in an industry that was also struggling. I don't have any great love for newspaper work, but my skillset is definitely in the written word and/or editing of some sort.
You could consider being a technical writer on contract at Amazon!! They pay pretty well for people to write up product descriptions. You'd be shocked.

And a side note, I read some responses to your question in the Denver forum and they all seem to think Seattle is best for you...in Seattle many think Denver is best for you. Probably means CD is not the best place to decide.

Last edited by texastrigirl; 03-26-2012 at 05:57 PM..
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:01 PM
 
245 posts, read 600,988 times
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We went back and forth over the same decision - In the end, better outdoor opportunities, more sunshine, milder winters (compared to MidWest), cheaper cost of living ... Won - so, we came to Colorado.

Don't think we can survive nine months of misty-dewy-dampy weather ...
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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I lived in Denver - brown, brown, brown and sprawl, sprawl, sprawl. SUV's and cookie-cutter housing developments as far up and down the front range as they can get. You see the same strip malls w/the same big box stores over and over for miles and miles until you have no idea which part of the city you're in because it all looks the same. Nice people but I got depressed there (in case you can't tell). The mountains are nearby, but not nearly as accessible and you're certainly not in the middle of two mountain ranges with forests that look like they're straight outta Lord of the Rings. In contrast, Seattle is called the 'Emerald City' and we have bridges that freakkin' float on the water.

OK - so I'm obviously biased, but that's my honest $.02 when it comes to Denver vs Seattle. I was also quite the nomad, but found that the minute I stepped off the train and took my first breath of cool, moist air - heavy with the promise of rain and growing things (and I was downtown to boot), Seattle has been 'home'. It was just something inside that had nothing to do with checkboxes. I wish you the best in finding that for yourself wherever it may be. (even Denver)
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AceShopper View Post
We went back and forth over the same decision - In the end, better outdoor opportunities,
And what would those be?
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