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Old 03-27-2012, 08:04 AM
 
1,729 posts, read 3,845,857 times
Reputation: 979

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post

I really do think SADD is real and affect people differently. There is a reason why Seattle has a "high" suicide rate.
In one simple line you blow the entire credibility of your post. Seattle does not have a high suicide rank. It's a myth.

In a ranking of major cities, Seattle was 27th

And this survey that actually ranks Denver # 8.


http://health-equity.pitt.edu/933/1/..._Inventory.pdf

You'll note that almost all of these come from significantly "sunnier" places.

http://www.businessinsider.com/most-...es-2011-7?op=1

Last edited by Bill Loney; 03-27-2012 at 08:12 AM..
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Old 03-27-2012, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Greater Seattle, WA Metro Area
1,938 posts, read 5,642,511 times
Reputation: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezter View Post
Sorry to bust your bubble, but isn't Seattle a sprawled out mess too? Have you even been to the inner city of Denver? Your completely describing the suburbs, which does no justice for the city of Denver at all. When did you live in Denver? Because your post seems to describe the scenery in winter. Look at any picture of Denver in spring and summer and it won't look "brown brown brown"
I beg to differ. I lived right below "Green Mountain" in Denver just off of Alameda Pkwy. It was only green in the spring for a few months...brown the rest of the year.
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Old 03-27-2012, 09:38 AM
 
226 posts, read 644,470 times
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ShrikeArghast: I don't have the attention span to read your entire post; but when you mention "quirky", the first thought in my mind is that Boulder would be a better fit than Denver.... that is, if you desire to live in Colorado.
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Old 03-27-2012, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,373 posts, read 7,659,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texastrigirl View Post
I beg to differ. I lived right below "Green Mountain" in Denver just off of Alameda Pkwy. It was only green in the spring for a few months...brown the rest of the year.
I guess It wouldn't look green to someone living in Seattle. Considering Denver is pretty much a desert and still has greenery for 5-6 months of the year is pretty cool. If your talking about the greenery of the grass, that could be another story.
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Old 03-27-2012, 11:45 AM
 
239 posts, read 417,218 times
Reputation: 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Loney View Post
In one simple line you blow the entire credibility of your post. Seattle does not have a high suicide rank. It's a myth.

In a ranking of major cities, Seattle was 27th

And this survey that actually ranks Denver # 8.


http://health-equity.pitt.edu/933/1/..._Inventory.pdf

You'll note that almost all of these come from significantly "sunnier" places.

The 15 Most Suicidal Cities In America
You can't always go by statistics when it comes to suicide reporting. Unlike other death statistics, suicide is highly underreported.

Suicide is much more complex psychological issue than SAD, when people commit suicide its not solely because of the climate or weather.

I would imagine that Seattle has a higher rate of SAD compared to Colorado knowing about the disorder. But I can't find any statistics on it so I won't say anymore.
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Old 03-27-2012, 12:07 PM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Vermont in 2019
9,044 posts, read 17,306,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCNNY View Post
You can't always go by statistics when it comes to suicide reporting. Unlike other death statistics, suicide is highly underreported.

Suicide is much more complex psychological issue than SAD, when people commit suicide its not solely because of the climate or weather.

I would imagine that Seattle has a higher rate of SAD compared to Colorado knowing about the disorder. But I can't find any statistics on it so I won't say anymore.
I've lost a close friend to suicide here in Boston (lowest ranked city on the list) and I'm an advocate for prevention. Believe me the impact makes the geography of the statistics pretty irrelevant as far as I'm concerned. It has everything to do with personal circumstance, mental illness and conditioning, and downright apathy, many of whom suffer drug & alcohol addctions and that is prevelant all over the US and can happen anywhere. I lived in Seattle for five years and I hadn't known anyone there that had contemplated suicide.
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Old 03-27-2012, 12:33 PM
 
1,729 posts, read 3,845,857 times
Reputation: 979
Quote:
Originally Posted by JCNNY View Post
You can't always go by statistics when it comes to suicide reporting. Unlike other death statistics, suicide is highly underreported.

.
I'm not following you here. One would think if that is the case, it is a relative issue. Meaning that an average number (% unreported) would be fairly consistent everywhere.

If nothing else, the salient point here is that reality does not always meet preconception.

Last edited by Bill Loney; 03-27-2012 at 12:53 PM..
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Old 03-27-2012, 12:58 PM
 
90 posts, read 118,895 times
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wow OP.. I love your writing style.

Wife and I are in the same situation here in Chandler AZ.. we are considering Portland or Seattle.

I work in IT and Seattle has Portland beat... but Portland does have the silicon forest with Intel, Nike, etc etc

But I agree... Phoenix area sucks majorly.. so desolate.. dusty.. polluted
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Old 03-27-2012, 02:32 PM
 
704 posts, read 1,439,318 times
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Denver is indeed a bit of a lunar landscape for the majority of the year. It's a surprisingly ugly city, and it is only the mountains that give it any semblence of beauty. Make no mistake, however, those mountains are truly awesome. Denver is also more conservative than Seattle, so I would imagine that would be something that makes Denver more attractive for you.

That said, however, Denver is a far more generic, middle-American, all-American, suburbanized metro area. There is really nothing that stands out about Denver, nothing truly special, other than the mountains. Our cultural scene is there, but not cutting edge or overwhelmingly popular or well-known. It's a generally quiet metro area, but there is usually something to do. Frankly, I like that. What I most like about Denver is that people go to the Olive Garden to "eat out," they drive SUVs and trucks, they live in suburbs, they are not terribly sophisticated (though they are educated), there is a fairly robust and active Christian population, and most really love the Broncos and their kids' baseball or soccer team. That's your average metro Denver familly. That's not to say that there aren't hip neighborhoods or cultural savants or people who don't like football, but it is to say that that is not really representative of Denver as a whole (and, frankly, you can find that stuff in any U.S. city over 300,000 people). In other words, Denver isn't really much different than Kansas City, Dallas, Indianapolis, Columbus, etc. except for the mountains and the huge outdoorsy culture that those mountains attract. At least that's my experience as a Denver native. I've lived almost exclusively in the suburbs, so consider the fact that, though I've spent plenty of time in the city itself, I've haven't lived there much.

It sounds, however, like that is what you least like about Phoenix. I haven't spent much time in Seattle, so it's hard to compare these cities. I have spent a year in the Pacific Northwest, however, and it was a very, very different experience for a Denver native like myself. The cultures are not the same, and the rainy, wet, cool climate in Oregon was a huge change from the sunny, dry, seasonal weather of Colorado.

Last edited by GoneNative; 03-27-2012 at 02:51 PM..
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Old 03-27-2012, 03:03 PM
 
90 posts, read 118,895 times
Reputation: 38
Also I just want to point out.. My Wife and I grew up in San Diego.. moved to Phoenix because it was so much cheaper.. we bought a McMansion house in the middle of nowhere.. 5 years later we realized we screwed up and dont want to live here any longer.. sold the house and currently renting in Chandler AZ until we can move out of here.

We considered San Diego only because we have 2 kids (2yr and 4mo) and would want them to grow up close to their relatives who are still in SD.. but we are over that city.. COL is way too high.. everyone we know is still there and struggling to survive

Seattle seems like a logical choice for us considering the vast IT industry.. but COL is probably on par with San Diego

Portland with his smaller feel, less traffic, and overall quirky weirdness has us on the fence on where would be the better location

We thought about Boulder.. but everyone saying that the Denver area with its semi desert and arid climate reminds me too much of Phoenix.. I hate the brown and LOVE the moss clinging to the trees all around the PNW
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