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Old Yesterday, 07:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Oklahoma and Arkansas?
Arkansas I can understand as the MS Delta extends into the state, I hear Little Rock kinda gives a Memphis-lite flavor like Jackson, and NW Arkansas has parallels with Huntsville/northern AL. And of course the state has a sizable rural Black population. Oklahoma I don't really get though.
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Old Yesterday, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana all have similar culture and scenery along the Gulf Coast. Mobile is to Alabama what New Orleans is to Louisiana. These are two similar cities with similar histories!
While Mobile and New Orleans as cities have some common features, I'm not aware of Louisiana having any wide, sandy beaches like Alabama (or even Mississippi). Louisiana is a bit different both culturally (with its overwhelming Cajun/Creole influence in much of the southern part) and economically (lots of oil & gas, very little automotive or high tech).

Alabama also has far more rugged topography than the other two states, and my guess is probably on track to see the strongest growth in the long term. It is less insular (note that Louisiana has one of the nation's highest share of residents born in the state) and closer to the more dynamic Atlantic seaboard states. They seem to have made a strong priority in recent years to raise the quality of their universities and tourist amenities, among other efforts.
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Old Yesterday, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
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Regarding recent posts, I don't think Oklahoma is all that similar to Mississippi or Alabama despite being among the most socially conservative parts of the nation. That's kind of like saying Hawaii and Vermont should be grouped together for their social liberalism. Oklahoma is difficult to classify, but I would say it's more similar to certain parts (not all) of Texas than anywhere else.
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Old Today, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Arkansas I can understand as the MS Delta extends into the state, I hear Little Rock kinda gives a Memphis-lite flavor like Jackson, and NW Arkansas has parallels with Huntsville/northern AL. And of course the state has a sizable rural Black population. Oklahoma I don't really get though.
I can see that, except Little Rock gives me a hillbilly vibe kind of.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jas75 View Post
While Mobile and New Orleans as cities have some common features, I'm not aware of Louisiana having any wide, sandy beaches like Alabama (or even Mississippi). Louisiana is a bit different both culturally (with its overwhelming Cajun/Creole influence in much of the southern part) and economically (lots of oil & gas, very little automotive or high tech).

Alabama also has far more rugged topography than the other two states, and my guess is probably on track to see the strongest growth in the long term. It is less insular (note that Louisiana has one of the nation's highest share of residents born in the state) and closer to the more dynamic Atlantic seaboard states. They seem to have made a strong priority in recent years to raise the quality of their universities and tourist amenities, among other efforts.
Louisiana has more coastline than Alabama and it's mostly beaches. They are ugly though.
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Old Today, 07:25 PM
 
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I have always grouped Louisiana with Texas and Oklahoma. Maybe its because most my experience in Louisiana is in the Shreveport area.
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Old Today, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
I have always grouped Louisiana with Texas and Oklahoma. Maybe its because most my experience in Louisiana is in the Shreveport area.
We call that Texas.
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Old Today, 07:44 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I can see that, except Little Rock gives me a hillbilly vibe kind of.

Louisiana has more coastline than Alabama and it's mostly beaches. They are ugly though.
No, Louisiana actually has very few sandy beaches. Most of the coast consists of wetlands transitioning into the ocean. Charleston and Savannah have some similarities with New Orleans as Old South coastal cities and seafood also features prominently in Charleston and Lowcountry cuisine despite its differences from Creole and Cajun food though there is a slight resemblance. Compare this to the local food found in the inland South like Tennessee.

I'd still say the states most similar to Louisiana are probably Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas. I'm not too familiar with North Louisiana but many people say its similar to Arkansas, especially Monroe. Some say there is a strong Texas influence in Lake Charles but that area has a heavy Cajun influence as well.
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Old Today, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
No, Louisiana actually has very few sandy beaches. Most of the coast consists of wetlands transitioning into the ocean. Charleston and Savannah have some similarities with New Orleans as Old South coastal cities and seafood also features prominently in Charleston and Lowcountry cuisine despite its differences from Creole and Cajun food though there is a slight resemblance. Compare this to the local food found in the inland South like Tennessee.

I'd still say the states most similar to Louisiana are probably Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas. I'm not too familiar with North Louisiana but many people say its similar to Arkansas, especially Monroe. Some say there is a strong Texas influence in Lake Charles but that area has a heavy Cajun influence as well.
Yeah you're right I thought the beaches from Little Florida Beach and Holly Beach stretched further east.

I don't know about a Texas influence in Lake Charles, I'd say there's a Louisiana influence in SE Texas.
Arkansas can be included but that's just for North Louisiana. Monroe reminds me much more of Jackson than Little Rock though.
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Old Today, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
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In my mind, I completely group them together
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