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Old 07-04-2012, 01:27 PM
 
Location: where u wish u lived
897 posts, read 355,224 times
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What cities would you say are fairly dense by American standards yet lack pedestrian activity and why? My vote goes to Miami, Phoenix, and Minneapolis but would like to know what are they lacking for this to turn around?
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Old 07-04-2012, 01:43 PM
 
Location: London, U.K.
883 posts, read 742,929 times
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LA
Atlanta
Miami
Dallas
Houston
Phoenix
San Diego

You know, the usual and they deserve it. What's LA's pedestrian level compared to its rivals NYC or Chicago? Atlanta compared to D.C.? Houston compared to Boston? Dallas compared to Philly? Miami compared to SF? Phoenix compared to Seattle? San Diego compared to Portland?

When you match similar sized areas with their "rivals" you get a better idea on how much the sunbelt is a drop off in pedestrian life. Expanding your transits, building more TODs, widening sidewalks, and moving parking lots behind retail not in front would be a good start for some of these cities.
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Old 07-04-2012, 01:53 PM
 
Location: where u wish u lived
897 posts, read 355,224 times
Reputation: 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAXTOR121 View Post
LA
Atlanta
Miami
Dallas
Houston
Phoenix
San Diego

You know, the usual and they deserve it. What's LA's pedestrian level compared to its rivals NYC or Chicago? Atlanta compared to D.C.? Houston compared to Boston? Dallas compared to Philly? Miami compared to SF? Phoenix compared to Seattle? San Diego compared to Portland?

When you match similar sized areas with their "rivals" you get a better idea on how much the sunbelt is a drop off in pedestrian life. Expanding your transits, building more TODs, widening sidewalks, and moving parking lots behind retail not in front would be a good start for some of these cities.
LOL ok I will give you new york but chicago? When I went there I didn't see too many more people walking around than what I saw in LA, sure most of the pedestrians in and around DTLA are mostly poor immigrants nut nevertheless the streets have pedestrian activity
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Old 07-04-2012, 01:57 PM
 
Location: London, U.K.
883 posts, read 742,929 times
Reputation: 765
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliSon View Post
LOL ok I will give you new york but chicago? When I went there I didn't see too many more people walking around than what I saw in LA, sure most of the pedestrians in and around DTLA are mostly poor immigrants nut nevertheless the streets have pedestrian activity
Well obviously Chicago is closer to LA than both are to NYC. Size alone would show you that 22 million vs 10 million but its that same size that makes Chicago's case to LA's an advantage, 10 million vs 18 million. Pedestrians coming off the el outnumber their LA counterparts and any good neighborhood in LA and Chicago will show you the difference. From a Brooklyn eye the closest any city has come to rivaling NYC's energy are the northeast areas of SF and the north side of Chicago.

It's not about poverty, it's just that LA is lacking for its size. None of the cities I listed in the sunbelt are devoid of street life (maybe Phoenix) but they don't fair well against cities they should be rivaling.
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:01 PM
 
Location: where u wish u lived
897 posts, read 355,224 times
Reputation: 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAXTOR121 View Post
Well obviously Chicago is closer to LA than both are to NYC. Size alone would show you that 22 million vs 10 million but its that same size that makes Chicago's case to LA's an advantage, 10 million vs 18 million. Pedestrians coming off the el outnumber their LA counterparts and any good neighborhood in LA and Chicago will show you the difference.
your talking as if all 18 million people are in the city of LA, I am comparing downtown to downtown and surrounding neighborhoods, have you visited both cities before? If you did you would know LA's pedestrian activity is almost equal to that of Chicago's even with a crappier PT
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:06 PM
 
Location: London, U.K.
883 posts, read 742,929 times
Reputation: 765
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliSon View Post
your talking as if all 18 million people are in the city of LA, I am comparing downtown to downtown and surrounding neighborhoods, have you visited both cities before? If you did you would know LA's pedestrian activity is almost equal to that of Chicago's even with a crappier PT
18 million metro means how many suburbanites end up in DTLA?

10 million metro means how many suburbanites end up in the loop?

Which downtown has more people and can show its a more vibrant city?

DTLA is comparable to every downtown in America just not midtown and lower manhattan, the loop, financial district of SF, or center city.

Boston city daytime population climbs an extra 1.2 million people and the pedestrian life is proof of that. After 7 PM it feels noticeably smaller. It's not city vs city, what many people fail to realize is that downtowns get a lot of traffic by the surrounding metro.
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: where u wish u lived
897 posts, read 355,224 times
Reputation: 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAXTOR121 View Post
Well obviously Chicago is closer to LA than both are to NYC. Size alone would show you that 22 million vs 10 million but its that same size that makes Chicago's case to LA's an advantage, 10 million vs 18 million. Pedestrians coming off the el outnumber their LA counterparts and any good neighborhood in LA and Chicago will show you the difference. From a Brooklyn eye the closest any city has come to rivaling NYC's energy are the northeast areas of SF and the north side of Chicago.

It's not about poverty, it's just that LA is lacking for its size. None of the cities I listed in the sunbelt are devoid of street life (maybe Phoenix) but they don't fair well against cities they should be rivaling.
I keep hearing people say this however most people who write this never venture outside of the westside of LA or never been here period, most of the pedestrian activity in LA are in its more immigrant poor areas, I grew up in this part of town I should know
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
3,285 posts, read 3,978,491 times
Reputation: 2019
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAXTOR121 View Post
LA
Atlanta
Miami
Dallas
Houston
Phoenix
San Diego

You know, the usual and they deserve it. What's LA's pedestrian level compared to its rivals NYC or Chicago? Atlanta compared to D.C.? Houston compared to Boston? Dallas compared to Philly? Miami compared to SF? Phoenix compared to Seattle? San Diego compared to Portland?

When you match similar sized areas with their "rivals" you get a better idea on how much the sunbelt is a drop off in pedestrian life. Expanding your transits, building more TODs, widening sidewalks, and moving parking lots behind retail not in front would be a good start for some of these cities.
Instead of focusing on the negatives, why don't you start focusing on the positives with some of these cities? Granted, many of them grew too quickly more recently, but don't ignore the fact that there ARE positive changes happening in these cities.
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:12 PM
 
Location: where u wish u lived
897 posts, read 355,224 times
Reputation: 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAXTOR121 View Post
18 million metro means how many suburbanites end up in DTLA?

10 million metro means how many suburbanites end up in the loop?

Which downtown has more people and can show its a more vibrant city?

DTLA is comparable to every downtown in America just not midtown and lower manhattan, the loop, financial district of SF, or center city.

Boston city daytime population climbs an extra 1.2 million people and the pedestrian life is proof of that. After 7 PM it feels noticeably smaller. It's not city vs city, what many people fail to realize is that downtowns get a lot of traffic by the surrounding metro.
DTLA is not the destination point to the city like it is in Chicago, most neighborhoods and cities are self reliant and need little venturing out to get things accomplished, however most of the activity in and around DTLA is of poor immigrants like I already said, when I went to Chicago the pedestrian activity was on par to what I see in LA, nothing special
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:14 PM
 
Location: where u wish u lived
897 posts, read 355,224 times
Reputation: 254
And are you really trying to say that because a CSA is of 18 million that everyone should somehow converge to downtown? LOL
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