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Old 11-20-2012, 09:55 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prelude91 View Post
How is any of that information relevant?
I thought highest mass transit ridership is relevant to ranking mass transit systems.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prelude91 View Post
It's true, but why would a LA cab be able to pick you up in Santa Monica?
Dropped someone off in Santa Monica, and is returning to Los Angeles, sees me hanging out in Santa Monica hailing a cab back to West LA or wherever in the city limits.

Or are you asking why legally they would be able to?
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I thought highest mass transit ridership is relevant to ranking mass transit systems.
I dont understand what is relevant to comparing ridership to metro population. For example, in Chicago, the EL is almost exclusively within Chicago city limits. People in Dupage, Will, Lake and a good portion of Cook counties have no access to the system (over 4 million people). I don't see the relevancy in using that population to compare transit systems.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Dropped someone off in Santa Monica, and is returning to Los Angeles, sees me hanging out in Santa Monica hailing a cab back to West LA or wherever in the city limits.

Or are you asking why legally they would be able to?
I am asking why legally they would be able to. That is pretty much how every taxi company in the country works. Can drop off outside your zone, but not pick up.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Boston would get a boost from Cambridge as well, which has its own cab system. Personally I didn't find Boston to be a place that I could super-easily hail a cab, other than in the most core areas like Back Bay, Fenway, Downtown, Cambridge. One thing that is annoying about Boston area cabs - if you are in Boston proper and a Cambridge / Somerville / Brookline cab drives by, the are not legally allowed to pick you up*. I wonder if this is the case in Los Angeles?

*hopefully not just some urban legend people told me
I would agree, Boston certainly is not as easy to grab a can as in say NYC, or Chicago. But in the outer neighborhoods and cities (South Boston, Brookline, Dorchester, etc.) most of them have cab stands adjacent to major roads or centers.

I am not sure if it's illegal, but I know the Boston cabs don't like it when a cab from say Brookline drops someone off in Boston and then picks someone up in Boston. I have had a Brookline cab pick me up in Boston before and 2 Boston cabs blocked the Brookline cab and the Brookline cab driver told me and my friends we won't be able to leave and to just go into one of the Boston cabs.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:10 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,740 posts, read 39,610,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prelude91 View Post
I dont understand what is relevant to comparing ridership to metro population. For example, in Chicago, the EL is almost exclusively within Chicago city limits. People in Dupage, Will, Lake and a good portion of Cook counties have no access to the system (over 4 million people). I don't see the relevancy in using that population to compare transit systems.
Well it prevents cities that are larger for doing better just because they're bigger. Using metro population is reasonable because cities that have a transit system that has good coverage right by the core and nowhere else will have an unfair advantage. For example, Boston appears to do quite a bit better than Chicago. But the transit coverage of Chicago's metro is a higher % of the metro than Boston's, so the difference is smaller if you look metro-wide.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TAM88 View Post
I would agree, Boston certainly is not as easy to grab a can as in say NYC, or Chicago. But in the outer neighborhoods and cities (South Boston, Brookline, Dorchester, etc.) most of them have cab stands adjacent to major roads or centers.

I am not sure if it's illegal, but I know the Boston cabs don't like it when a cab from say Brookline drops someone off in Boston and then picks someone up in Boston. I have had a Brookline cab pick me up in Boston before and 2 Boston cabs blocked the Brookline cab and the Brookline cab driver told me and my friends we won't be able to leave and to just go into one of the Boston cabs.
Wow.

And yeah now that I think about it there was a cab stand near where I worked on Beacon Street near Coolidge Corner in Brookline. Didn't take many cabs though, too broke. The one cab experience I remember was on a Halloween Night near Kenmore, took like 45 minutes to get a cab because every single one that went by was full, and not due to a lack of cabs.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Well it prevents cities that are larger for doing better just because they're bigger. Using metro population is reasonable because cities that have a transit system that has good coverage right by the core and nowhere else will have an unfair advantage. For example, Boston appears to do quite a bit better than Chicago. But the transit coverage of Chicago's metro is a higher % of the metro than Boston's, so the difference is smaller if you look metro-wide.
That methodology is useless. You are adding portions of Wisconsin and Indiana (and a small part of Michigan) to determine % of riders on the CHICAGO Transit Authority?

A much more meaningful comparison would be comparing the population who has access to the transit system.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:26 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,740 posts, read 39,610,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prelude91 View Post
That methodology is useless. You are adding portions of Wisconsin and Indiana (and a small part of Michigan) to determine % of riders on the CHICAGO Transit Authority?

A much more meaningful comparison would be comparing the population who has access to the transit system.
Shouldn't the fact that parts of the metro is less transit friendly (or doesn't even have access) count against the metro? City limits are useless.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:30 AM
 
Location: The City
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Old Urbanist: Density and Transit: Some Numbers
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