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Old 07-13-2012, 07:18 AM
 
Location: In the heights
20,110 posts, read 21,722,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Summersm343 View Post
Not really. Both Boston and Philly have VERY extensive transit systems.
Boston is slightly better than Philly, but both aren't particularly good. They're amazing compared to many other large cities in the US, but that doesn't mean they aren't both glaringly deficient.
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Old 07-13-2012, 08:13 AM
 
Location: The City
21,945 posts, read 30,797,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Boston is slightly better than Philly, but both aren't particularly good. They're amazing compared to many other large cities in the US, but that doesn't mean they aren't both glaringly deficient.

Agree The thing with these and even Chicago and DC (not as much NYC but somewhat there too) is that for a place like Boston or Philly it can be very good. The issue is too many holes and inneficiencies.

Perfect example; getting from Kendall Sq in Cambridge to Logan requires a change from the red to green for one stop to the blue (nitpicky yes). And the rail coverage lack, especially in Philly

So while they do certain things really well they have far too many holes. Another perfect example is the MFL subway line with no stop between Broad and 30th street - the current heart of the cbd

There are also great examples like getting to the Philadelphia stadium complex from most core areas of th city is very good

Is a shame for some of the older systems like Boston and Philly that they did not do a better job enhancing and modifying their system to best serve the area.

But agree these systems are so much better than the VAST majority of the US.
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Old 07-13-2012, 08:28 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,664 posts, read 18,206,684 times
Reputation: 11163
Quote:
Originally Posted by TAM88 View Post
3. D.C./Boston (Tough call for me given the commuter rail in Boston, which D.C. lacks)
DC has commuter rail - Marc and VRE. They don't show up on the metrorail maps, though they probably should.


http://www.perryvillemd.org/pics/marc-train-map.gif



http://www.vre.org/graphics/systemmap.jpg


Still, need to step up the plate with those 2. It's ridiculous that there's no rail connecting DC with Annapolis.

Last edited by BigCityDreamer; 07-13-2012 at 08:36 AM..
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Old 07-13-2012, 08:37 AM
 
Location: NYC
3,246 posts, read 4,547,472 times
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1. NYC
2. Chicago
3. DC
4. Boston
5. Philadelphia/SF
6. Baltimore
7. LA
8. Portland (OR)
9. Atlanta
10. Seattle

(OK, technically that's 11)
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Old 07-13-2012, 09:56 AM
 
9,583 posts, read 10,915,282 times
Reputation: 2109
Quote:
Originally Posted by TAM88 View Post
I think the list of cities that have a subway/light rail system is pretty big.

It's nice to see cities like Houston expanding their transit options. I am surprised Miami, given their tight land constraints, are not putting a big focus on expanding their transit system.


1. NYC
2. Chicago
3. D.C./Boston (Tough call for me given the commuter rail in Boston, which D.C. lacks)
4. D.C./Boston
5. San Francisco
6. Philadelphia
7. Atlanta
8. Los Angeles
9. Cleveland
10. Seattle
DC's suburbs have 5 commuter rail lines. The problem is commuter rail can't compare to heavy rail frequency. People in DC's suburbs are use to city level subway frequency of 3-5 minutes at rush hour miles outside DC proper in the suburbs. People in other cities around the nation living in the suburbs don't have access to that level of premium transit. There is a lot more suburb to suburb commuting in DC than other cities by train because of the frequency. With trains leaving every 3-5 minutes during rush hour, many people just ride a couple stops in the suburbs and get off in the suburbs. DC's metro having an extensive network in the suburbs with such high frequency has allowed an urban level dynamic to exist in many suburban transit corridors in DC that only exist in inner cities with extensive subway networks around the nation. The DC region is full of edge cities that can only exist because of Metro. Tyson's Corner's evolution into an urban district from its car dependent form is the last piece that will truly complete DC's job focused transit network.

No one could have known that building DC's subway system to funnel workers from the suburbs into downtown DC 40 years ago overtime could evolve into reverse commuting and suburb to suburb commuting to urban transit oriented corridors that offer city level density, ammenties, and quality of life anchored by premium rapid transit and urban infrastructure way out in the suburbs surrounding DC. Without Metro's design, DC would not have the Orange line Rosslyn-Ballston Corridor or the emerging Redline Bethesda-Rockville Corridor and Silver Spring-Wheaton Corridors. The Silver Line Tyson's Corner-Reston corridors is shaping up to be yet another example of urban redevelopment and smart growth planning. Suburbs around the nation in every metro are full of subdivisions. Metro's design is allowing urban corridors in the suburbs near these older sub-divisions lined with jobs and urban housing that doesn't exist in other cities. It's truly transformed the region.
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Old 07-13-2012, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,561,310 times
Reputation: 3941
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForYourLungsOnly View Post
yeah. I think people will argue about the order, but those seem to be the agreed upon top six. Now that I think about it I'd definitely include Atlanta in the 7-10 spot but not sure of any others. LA I suppose.
7-10 is definitely where this gets interesting, as LA, Miami, Baltimore, Seattle, Portland and Atlanta all have legitimate arguments. It would get even more interesting to expand the list to 15, as cities like San Diego, Dallas, New Orleans, Houston, Charlotte, San Jose all probably have a shot at that.

Seems like everyone is focusing on rail transit / rapid transit systems - it's harder to compare bus systems because they are so complicated it can be hard to understand even just one bus system in your own city, let alone all 10 of the most extensive ones. For example, I would rank Atlanta higher than LA based on MARTA rail vs. Metro Rail - but throw in the bus systems / commuter rail and that might actually make LA the better city for public transit (it did in my ranking).
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Old 07-13-2012, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Chicago (from pittsburgh)
3,678 posts, read 4,350,262 times
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my personal opinion is that Chicago takes a firm 2nd place, with DC VERY close behind (Chicago's commuter rail and bus services give it the edge, along with its quality heavy rail)

http://mappery.com/maps/Chicago-Train-Map.jpg
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Old 07-13-2012, 10:11 AM
 
Location: The City
21,945 posts, read 30,797,404 times
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^^Agree but just think how DC has come in a shorter time then the earlier folks DC gets more funds (Yes MD it does no matter how much you disagree) and will likely surpass Chicago in the next 15 years or so

I though Roto had the best list so far posted earlier
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Old 07-13-2012, 10:27 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,664 posts, read 18,206,684 times
Reputation: 11163
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForYourLungsOnly View Post
my personal opinion is that Chicago takes a firm 2nd place, with DC VERY close behind (Chicago's commuter rail and bus services give it the edge, along with its quality heavy rail)

http://mappery.com/maps/Chicago-Train-Map.jpg
I wish there was a DC map combining all the commuter rail, metrorail and bus lines in the region.

DC doesn't have maps like this which other cities seem to. I could never figure out why.
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Old 07-13-2012, 10:36 AM
 
9,583 posts, read 10,915,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I wish there was a DC map combining all the commuter rail, metrorail and bus lines in the region.

DC doesn't have maps like this which other cities seem to. I could never figure out why.
Different transit agencies. They never combine maps.
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