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Old 12-16-2013, 12:50 PM
 
9,828 posts, read 11,373,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiVegas View Post
How are these places urban? What is urban about Crystal City?

It's dense, but a dead zone of Defense Department office buildings and parking garages. There is no streetlife; in fact it's hard to find a human walking the streets.

Built environment is what I'm talking about when examing urbanity. How far are buildings from the street? How are building oriented? How wide are streets? How is traffic mitigated? How is the street designed? How is the sidewalk designed? How much of the lot is used (FAR) etc.? People has more to do with what fills the retail of the buildings and how many buildings are oriented to residential. Crystal City will improve as the mix changes.
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Old 12-16-2013, 12:53 PM
 
4,951 posts, read 8,502,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiVegas View Post
This is all wrong. Silver Spring has a giant parking garage uphill from the station.

I can't think of a single Metro stop in the DC suburbs that doesn't have tons of parking. Not one. Obviously the Metro riders are getting to the station by car, so they need somewhere to park.

Where is the surface parking at Pentagon City? Crystal City? Glenmont? Wheaton? Clarendon? Rosslyn? Bethesda? Courthouse? Show me on google maps.
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Old 12-16-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,322 posts, read 2,295,310 times
Reputation: 1571
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
The only streets in Bethesda that are urban are in downtown Bethesda. Everything else is like most of L.A., not urban.

I think this is pretty urban outside DTLA.

https://www.google.com/maps/preview#...OXsA!2e0&fid=5

https://www.google.com/maps/preview#...R27w!2e0&fid=5

https://www.google.com/maps/preview#...-xdQ!2e0&fid=5


https://www.google.com/maps/preview#...Yskw!2e0&fid=5


https://www.google.com/maps/preview#...8.219108&fid=5
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Old 12-16-2013, 12:55 PM
 
Location: In the heights
21,880 posts, read 23,424,783 times
Reputation: 11482
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Built environment is what I'm talking about when examing urbanity. How far are buildings from the street? How are building oriented? How wide are streets? How is traffic mitigated? How is the street designed? How is the sidewalk designed? How much of the lot is used (FAR) etc.? People has more to do with what fills the retail of the buildings and how many buildings are oriented to residential. Crystal City will improve as the mix changes.
Then look at some areas of Long Beach, Pasadena, or Culver City.
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Old 12-16-2013, 12:57 PM
 
9,828 posts, read 11,373,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Streetwalls! It's all about aesthetics, don't you know?

Reason #1 why urban planners are significantly overrated. They messed our cities up in the mid-century, they'll probably do it again in the 00s.
How is going back to principals that put the pedestrian first instead of the car going to mess up cities? The car messed up cities, not urban planners. They accommodated it which was the dumbest thing they could have ever done and left us with the mess of cleaning it up. Thousands of years of pedestrian scale ruined in a matter of 30 years because of the car. It's a travesty honestly. We will have it fixed for you in a couple decades.
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Old 12-16-2013, 12:57 PM
 
2,126 posts, read 1,437,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiVegas View Post
This is all wrong. Silver Spring has a giant parking garage uphill from the station.

I can't think of a single Metro stop in the DC suburbs that doesn't have tons of parking. Not one. Obviously the Metro riders are getting to the station by car, so they need somewhere to park.

Here are a few for starters - Ballston, Virginia Square, Clarendon, Rosslyn, King Street, Braddock Road.
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Old 12-16-2013, 12:58 PM
 
4,951 posts, read 8,502,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disposable3 View Post
LOL that looks like Texas suburbs, DC metro be getting straight rural.
Parts of LA are very rural and full of strip malls and surface parking lots. This is in the city.
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Old 12-16-2013, 12:59 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,273 posts, read 2,561,383 times
Reputation: 1619
I think the point here is that DC does do suburban TOD probably better than anybody else. If you want to have the convenience of a suburban lifestyle but still live in a fancy apartment building with an array of modern amenities and easy access into the city, I think DC does offer better options than any other metro.

People bringing up places like Hoboken, JC, Harrison and Newark... Hoboken and JC are not really suburbs. They are functionally and geographically equivalent to Bklyn and Queens. And Harrison and Newark cannot really be compared with places like Bethesda and Ballston. Day and night.
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Old 12-16-2013, 01:00 PM
 
4,951 posts, read 8,502,615 times
Reputation: 2062
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
Here are a few for starters - Ballston, Clarendon, Rosslyn, King Street, Braddock Road.
It's obvious, he has never been to the DMV. Bethesda, Silver Spring, Forest Glen don't have any surface parking either. Neither does Crystal City or Pentagon City.
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Old 12-16-2013, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,041,354 times
Reputation: 3974
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Then look at some areas of Long Beach, Pasadena, or Culver City.
What is funny is that all of these places being deemed "un-urban" are actually original transit-oriented development.
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