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Old 12-16-2013, 03:28 PM
 
572 posts, read 544,170 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Do you have any idea how much residential is being built around D.C.'s metro system? About 40,000 housing units are being built within a 1/2 mile of all of D.C.'s metro station's over the next 4 years. You won't recognize any of these places going forward. You will see soon enough.

Pipeline: New condos and apartments coming to DC metro area
Ok. But the places that have tons of residential aren't exactly bustling after work hours. It's not just a residential component. These places were built from scratch and it shows. Places like Crystal City and Pentagon City have had residential for 20-30 years. Where are the people? Don't say in the underground mall thing either. It's just as dead outside of 9-5.
Crystal City is such a bizarre place. You see all of these highrises, office and residential, and nobody on the street. It's like something out of a sci fi movie.

This is urban to you? Really? Ok.
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiVegas View Post
First, Bethesda is overwhelmingly single family detached homes, so the notion that you "can't have it and be urban" is strange indeed. I thought Bethesda was Example A of DC suburbia, yet it's mostly single family sprawl.

Second, Montclair is much older and more walkable and accessible for transportation alternatives than Bethesda. It was established before cars dominated, and looks it. It has real streetcar suburban feel, not a bunch of strip malls and office parks squeezed next to a commuter station, and then nothing but postwar sprawl.

Third, DC doesn't have many highrises, and Paris has fewer still. Paris may be the best urbanity on earth, so saying that highrises are necessary for urbanity is odd indeed.

Montclair, BTW, is not really unique. There are dozens of Montclairs in the NYC area. I think they all are equal or better than a place like Bethesda or Silver Spring when it comes to urban form.

When I say, and have been saying Bethesda for the last five hours, this is what I have been talking about:


The boundaries I consider Bethesda, MD along with everyone else from D.C. making this argument:
https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=O...p=7&sz=15&z=15
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PalmsTown View Post
Ok. But the places that have tons of residential aren't exactly bustling after work hours. It's not just a residential component. These places were built from scratch and it shows. Places like Crystal City and Pentagon City have had residential for 20-30 years. Where are the people?
Crystal City is such a bizarre place. You see all of these highrises, office and residential, and nobody on the street. It's like something out of a sci fi movie.

The density is way too low in all those places. They are not mixed use currently. Not enough people live there. When the density reaches 50,000+ throughout which they will, they will be booming with activity. That is what happens when you add 10,000-20,000 people to those area's.
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
When I say, and have been saying Bethesda for the last five hours, this is what I have been talking about:


The boundaries I consider Bethesda, MD along with everyone else from D.C. making this argument:
https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=O...p=7&sz=15&z=15
That is downtown Bethesda. Yeah, obviously a downtown area is more built-up. But all the rest of Bethesda is just sprawl.

Montclair has very little sprawl. It is mostly built pre-automobile era, and looks it. It isn't remarkably dense, or urban, or anything really, but is illustrative of the differences between NYC area suburbs and DC area suburbs.
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiVegas View Post
One city in NYC area, Stamford, is building 10,000 apartments alone in a single development. There is far more existing multifamily in the NYC area suburbs, and far more u/c, then in DC.

Timeline for that development? 2-3 years?

Also, I would hope NYC has more under construction since it's twice the land area of D.C.
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
When the density reaches 50,000+ throughout which they will,
LOL. None of these areas are at 10,000, and most are already overdeveloped, yet you think they will get 5 times denser.

You can't build anything at Crystal City. They have height limits, and the whole thing is pretty much built out. It's next to the airport, and surrounded by highways and suburbia.
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:35 PM
 
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When I was younger in DC, I used to think these nodes were kind of cool, compared to Reston/Fairfax county.

But I moved to Chicago, and that perception changed. I used to go back and visit family and visit these TOD nodes. They seem so average on the street level. There's nothing unique about them. If the Federal Government didn't pump money into these areas, what would they be?
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:38 PM
 
572 posts, read 544,170 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
The density is way too low in all those places. They are not mixed use currently. Not enough people live there. When the density reaches 50,000+ throughout which they will, they will be booming with activity. That is what happens when you add 10,000-20,000 people to those area's.
What are you talking about? There's always been residential in these places. Since the early 1980s or late 1970s.

People just don't walk. There's nothing to walk to. If you're a resident in Crystal City or Rossyln, where are you going to walk to on a Saturday? A coffee shop?

That's why when people bring up Reston, or Tysons, I just smile. People will still drive everywhere.

I spent a lot of time in DC metro. I rarely, rarely, saw anyone use the metro to go to the grocery store.
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:39 PM
 
9,585 posts, read 10,917,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiVegas View Post
That is downtown Bethesda. Yeah, obviously a downtown area is more built-up. But all the rest of Bethesda is just sprawl.

Montclair has very little sprawl. It is mostly built pre-automobile era, and looks it. It isn't remarkably dense, or urban, or anything really, but is illustrative of the differences between NYC area suburbs and DC area suburbs.

Who has been talking about the rest of Bethesda? Or the rest of Silver Spring?


I had a feeling you really didn't know what people were arguing? Has anybody in the 65 pages in this thread every said suburb A in D.C. is more urban than suburb B as a whole? I know I haven't. I'm only talking about the area that matter's which is right around the downtown and metro station. Who is going to walk 2 miles to the other parts of Bethesda? I don't know anybody who ventures out of the boundaries I just showed you in Bethesda.

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Old 12-16-2013, 03:42 PM
 
9,585 posts, read 10,917,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PalmsTown View Post
What are you talking about? There's always been residential in these places. Since the early 1980s or late 1970s.

People just don't walk. There's nothing to walk to. If you're a resident in Crystal City or Rossyln, where are you going to walk to on a Saturday? A coffee shop?

That's why when people bring up Reston, or Tysons, I just smile. People will still drive everywhere.

Pentagon City has a density of 12,000. That is awful.

Crystal City has a tiny sliver that 52,000 next to an 11,000 tract. When all of them are 50,000, that is when it will change. That means tract, after tract, after tract.

http://projects.nytimes.com/census/2010/map
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