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Old 06-18-2013, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
457 posts, read 436,927 times
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Boston also replaced most of its colonial architecture. Also federalist architecture such as in Beacon Hill does not count and the North End is tenement buildings and downtown is mostly buildings from the late 1800s and on since it burnt down at one point.
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Old 06-18-2013, 10:46 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Yes, in large cities, few 18th century buildings survived. With much larger cities, newer, denser and more modern buildings were necessary. The prevelance of urban fires back then lowered their chances further. Only a few scattered examples remain in either city, though I'd guess a bit more in Philadelphia since it was (and is) larger. Official and church buildings were more likely to survive. I suspect it's easier to find 18th century buildings in small towns or rural western MA than in Boston. This basement of this 1713 government building in Boston (now a museum) got turned into a subway station:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_(MBTA_station)
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Old 06-18-2013, 11:24 AM
 
Location: The City
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Both have a lot, would think Charleston as well

Not sure who has more but both (all) have some tremendous examples


The Colonial Philadelphia Walking Tour - YouTube
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Old 06-18-2013, 11:33 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Britain in contrast has more buildings in brick and stone because much of their forests were cut down in the Middle Ages. This is also why you may see thatch roofs in older homes in England instead of the wood roofs in the older homes in America.
And for another reason was that wooden buildings tended to burn. Much of London was wood in the 17th century, and it burned to the ground in a fire (1666).
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Old 02-10-2015, 10:57 AM
 
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Philadelphia easily.
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Old 12-23-2018, 12:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Both have a lot, would think Charleston as well

Not sure who has more but both (all) have some tremendous examples


The Colonial Philadelphia Walking Tour - YouTube
Donít know about the numbers but Philly is more cohesive. Colonial Boston was basically an archipelago.
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Old 12-23-2018, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
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I’d say Philadelphia over Boston. Boston has more varied architecture in its core- Lest we forget, much of Boston was actually land fill and built out due to demand. In fact, Boston has as much in common in that way with Chicago as it does with Philadelphia.

I’d say Boston’s suburbs, in every direction, have maintained a more colonial, quaint, traditional vibe than Philly’s suburbs. Main line has that, but you can extend as far north of Portsmouth and as far south as Providence in the Boston area and colonialism is everywhere. North shore, south shore, metrowest, all the way out as far as Greenfield.
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Old 12-23-2018, 10:08 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,729 posts, read 6,137,255 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Yes, in large cities, few 18th century buildings survived. With much larger cities, newer, denser and more modern buildings were necessary. The prevelance of urban fires back then lowered their chances further. Only a few scattered examples remain in either city, though I'd guess a bit more in Philadelphia since it was (and is) larger. Official and church buildings were more likely to survive. I suspect it's easier to find 18th century buildings in small towns or rural western MA than in Boston. This basement of this 1713 government building in Boston (now a museum) got turned into a subway station:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_(MBTA_station)


How many cities have a building that looks like that? Baltimore has one that has been turned into a Walgreen.
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Old 12-25-2018, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,453 posts, read 7,518,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
I’d say Philadelphia over Boston. Boston has more varied architecture in its core- Lest we forget, much of Boston was actually land fill and built out due to demand. In fact, Boston has as much in common in that way with Chicago as it does with Philadelphia.

I’d say Boston’s suburbs, in every direction, have maintained a more colonial, quaint, traditional vibe than Philly’s suburbs. Main line has that, but you can extend as far north of Portsmouth and as far south as Providence in the Boston area and colonialism is everywhere. North shore, south shore, metrowest, all the way out as far as Greenfield.
Not quite that cut-and-dried, though. Each area has different settlement patterns. As you alluded to, the Philly area doesn't have the very unique and quaint coastal towns that you find around Boston--that's definitely a New England attribute, or at least to the extent that it's found in this region.

But colonial-style architecture can absolutely be found across the Mid-Atlantic, notably in large towns/cities like Lancaster, York, Harrisburg, Trenton, Princeton, Bethlehem, Wlimington, New Castle, etc. etc, and a plethora of smaller village-type towns.

Also, definitely disagree with the variation of architecture in Philly v. Boston. You'll find literally hundreds of rowhome or "twin" styles in/around Philly in multiple types or brick and stone. This is compared to what is overwhelmingly a brownstone or clapboard Boston in a Victorian or simple colonial style, which while typically very charming, doesn't vary quite as much.
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Old 12-25-2018, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,083 posts, read 1,101,247 times
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Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Not quite that cut-and-dried, though. Each area has different settlement patterns. As you alluded to, the Philly area doesn't have the very unique and quaint coastal towns that you find around Boston--that's definitely a New England attribute, or at least to the extent that it's found in this region.

But colonial-style architecture can absolutely be found across the Mid-Atlantic, notably in large towns/cities like Lancaster, York, Harrisburg, Trenton, Princeton, Bethlehem, Wlimington, New Castle, etc. etc, and a plethora of smaller village-type towns.

Also, definitely disagree with the variation of architecture in Philly v. Boston. You'll find literally hundreds of rowhome or "twin" styles in/around Philly in multiple types or brick and stone. This is compared to what is overwhelmingly a brownstone or clapboard Boston in a Victorian or simple colonial style, which while typically very charming, doesn't vary quite as much.
Sounds like based on your latter statement, you actually agree overwhelmingly for the sake of this thread, not disagree. Reread.
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