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Old 01-11-2011, 08:23 PM
 
Location: NY/FL
818 posts, read 1,102,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnatl View Post
No, what is really lame are your relentless attacks on Atlanta. And the population of metro Atlanta is currently running 600,000 less than you claim for the purposes of the reports I linked to. More lies.

Take a good look at the map you posted. It makes Atlanta look like a demographers dream compared to segregated and SHARPLY divided NY & Philadelphia. How about you show us the percentage of the Asian pop. of Miami while you're at it?
New map, 2009 version. In NYC, you can see Asians and Hispanics, in Atlanta its rare

NYC-Philly corridor

Atlanta-Birmingham corridor
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Old 01-11-2011, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 7,948,719 times
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Milwaukee or Chicago, no?
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Old 01-11-2011, 08:49 PM
 
864 posts, read 853,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous Past View Post
New map, 2009 version. In NYC, you can see Asians and Hispanics, in Atlanta its rare

NYC-Philly corridor

Atlanta-Birmingham corridor
lol @ the dark blue spots in the NE corridor. Is this dude serious?
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Old 01-11-2011, 08:56 PM
 
57 posts, read 137,237 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous Past View Post
New map, 2009 version. In NYC, you can see Asians and Hispanics, in Atlanta its rare

NYC-Philly corridor

Atlanta-Birmingham corridor

The only thing your map shows is how segregated Philly and New York really is.
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Old 01-11-2011, 09:20 PM
 
430 posts, read 1,400,129 times
Reputation: 314
use this tool to distinguish which races live where, and which areas are the most segregated

Mapping America — Census Bureau 2005-9 American Community Survey - NYTimes.com
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Old 01-11-2011, 09:46 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,757 posts, read 39,805,484 times
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If you zoom in, you'll see there are lots of transition zones between white, black, hispanic and asian neighborhoods in NYC. Most areas are a bit mixed, though they are some completely segegrated neighborhoods.

Compared to Chicago. There the map shows a much more sudden change.
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Old 01-11-2011, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,458 posts, read 7,288,419 times
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Wow, the more recent arguments on here are interesting.

I'm sorry, but I am getting tired of some of the people from places like NYC automatically writing off anything as southern as being racists, unprogressive, and therefore more segregated.

Well.... I'm sorry, but I think it's time for y'all to wake up and start addressing some of the issues that affect our society(country-wide) as much as we have down here.

I won't dare try to argue things are perfect here. I won't dare try to argue we don't have tensions. I won't dare try to argue that we don't have problems, but the fact of the matter is this was ground zero for slavery, segregation by law, and the civil rights movement. We had large populations of different racial groups that were historically segregated in the most extreme way. Those same populations have been forced to deal with issues and try to address them. We have along way to go, but we have also come a long way.

In fact, I would dare to argue one of the reasons we often have more tension is because of the rapid pace we are integrating, more likely to talk about race, and address some of the problems we've had in the past/now.

Now you look in cities in other parts of the country and they might not feel as much friction or tension, but their neighborhoods appear more likely to be 100% black, 100% Chinese, or 100% white. Part of the reason Atlanta doesn't have a China town, Korea town, Vietnam town is they are less segregated where they live. The areas are more multi racial. In the Atlanta area one only needs to look in the Gwinnett Place mall area and further south down Buford highway to see an extensive amount of Chinese, Korean, Hispanics, and Vietnamese businesses. However, not one of them dominates the whole area to warrant calling it Chinatown, etc..
You are much more likely to see Chinese families living in predominately black or white neighborhoods rather than living in predominately Chinese neighborhoods. You are much more likely to see a Chinese owned business next door to a white owned business, a black owned business, and a Hispanic owned business. Now, with that said... I have seen an interesting trend. Many of the cultural groups that are smaller minorities around Atlanta (Hispanics, Asians, etc..), while they are highly integrated in their lifestyle, they are more likely to be in the northeast part of town to be closer proximity to religious institutions, ethnic based markets/stores. Not all parts of our life are integrating, but we are increasingly spread out and next door to each other.


Also, remember this forum was about --segregation--. The statistics on what city/metro have more black people, Asian people, Hispanic people, or white people don't really matter that much. The key is analyzing those dot-density maps and looking at how much they choose to live apart or in the same neighborhoods. If you look at Atlanta's map it is clear the southside is the traditional area where the black population established and whites on the northside, but even with that disparity when you look at the individual dots you see lots of red dots in areas that are predominately blue and lots of blue dots in areas that are predominately red... (and so on). The degree to, which that exists is what a measure of segregation is.

Look at a more extreme example on the other end... Detroit. The blue area is mostly blue... not too many red dots at all... and vice versa.

Now NYC is an interesting place and has lots of interesting multicultural offerings. However, Chinatown exists, because when Chinese moved there they kept themselves more segregated. You can also look at the black neighborhoods in Brooklyn and in the Bronx to realize many of those neighborhoods aren't just mostly black, but almost entirely black. That is segregation within the city. Yes, there are transitional neighborhoods, multicultural exposure, and different types of cultures. But, there is alot of segregation. Albeit, not as much as Detroit.

Now on my block in my neighborhood there are several white families, an Indian family, and a couple of black families. The street is also like this block, the neighborhood is like this street, and the next neighborhood over is the same way. On a map this area is predominately red/green (compared to what map you look at on this thread), but you also see lots of scattered red, yellow, blue and whatever color is used on the dot-density maps. Areas in Atlanta like this are very common and for that reason it is often regarded as a modern city that is becoming less segregated than others.

To reinforce my point I am providing a link to a Time magazine article about demographers that have researched segregation in this country. They specifically say Atlanta, Miami, and Fort Myers as places in this country that are the least segregated.

Black Segregation in U.S. Drops to Lowest in Century - TIME (http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2036863,00.html - broken link)


A note to other New Yorkers: Please take my apologies if it seems as if I am picking on NYC most in my post. I love NYC and it is an absolute gem and it is certain a multicultural city in many ways, even if the neighborhoods are more segregated. Sometimes the segregated neighborhoods produce an interesting cultural community that can't be found as easily in a place like Atlanta. I also don't want to make it sound like NY isn't integrating more than it has in the past. According to data 3/4 of the metro areas are becoming more integrated than they were.

My response mainly used NY as a comparison, because of people like "Infamous Past" who don't seem to know the differences very when talking about segregation/integration, especially when they use Chinatown as a means to prove a city isn't segregated. To us... we hear statements like his all the time. We hear them on these boards, to people who move her (there are many of y'all down here... Most people in Atlanta aren't from Atlanta), and we hear them from people visiting. However, it is often from a stereotyped view of what the South is and is like these days. Many don't seem to know what our whole region is like. More often or not the most stereotyped views come from people from NY and Chicago, but that might be biased by how much larger these cities are than other east coast cities.
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Old 01-14-2011, 10:33 AM
 
Location: GOVERNMENT of TRAITORS & NAZIS
20,630 posts, read 22,811,400 times
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Detroit was built on segregation. Now it thrives on it. Used to be in the day it was "US" vs "THEM" Now days there is no more them, only us are left...
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Old 01-14-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Southeastern Tennessee
711 posts, read 947,478 times
Reputation: 375
Folks seem to just naturally segregate themselves. It happens in every city and state. Some folks may view it as sad, others may be happy about it. Folks live where they want and where they feel the safest. I wouldn't debate on this, it is an age old question that doesn't have an easy answer.
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Old 01-14-2011, 03:55 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,707 posts, read 18,297,379 times
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People often segregrate themselves at least as much for cultural reasons as they do for racial or class reasons.
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