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Old 12-26-2007, 11:44 AM
 
Location: from houstoner to bostoner to new yorker to new jerseyite ;)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMDallas View Post
That doesn't tell you much, they don't live their because they are discriminated against, they live their because they are new to the country and have no money.
This is not true for the black population of Austin who have largely lived east of I-35 historically. This may not apply to recent Black transplants to the city, who are presumably educated and can afford to live west of I-35, but their numbers are fewer than those who live east.
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Old 12-28-2007, 07:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trkstp Tina View Post
People always think the South is so segregated and racist. Of course, the people complaining about this are often people living up north in predominantly white communities themselves. Many of these people are not living in cities or towns with large populations of African Americans--who are they to judge? The Southern towns do tend to be segregated (my parents' town in South Carolina is an example), but in the South, blacks and whites have been living side-by-side for a long time, and yes, there is some prejudice, but also a level of acceptance that is quite unique.

I am living in the South and some of my worst incidents with racial prejudice have been in the South. I had no problems while living in the Pacific Northwest.
As for blacks and whites "getting along" in the South, I believe that was only so provided blacks didn't overstep their boundaries and there was an implicit "know your place" attitude. Historically, that is what has happened.
Segregation in big cities, however, exists everywhere, whether it's New York or Chicago, or Atlanta or Dallas or San Francisco. It's all over. The difference is that in Chicago and New York, both places are bigger and have had more ethnic groups living there, so the segregation on a social scale was more visible. In the South, it was simply black and white.
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Old 12-28-2007, 08:34 AM
 
Location: mid wyoming
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Memphis, my gosh just go there and spend a week. Just was a shock at how treatment of me. Goes by color of other person. Felt this was a town I definately didn't want to live in or close by.
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Old 12-28-2007, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Maryland
266 posts, read 795,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pirate_lafitte View Post
I am living in the South and some of my worst incidents with racial prejudice have been in the South. I had no problems while living in the Pacific Northwest.
As for blacks and whites "getting along" in the South, I believe that was only so provided blacks didn't overstep their boundaries and there was an implicit "know your place" attitude. Historically, that is what has happened.
Segregation in big cities, however, exists everywhere, whether it's New York or Chicago, or Atlanta or Dallas or San Francisco. It's all over. The difference is that in Chicago and New York, both places are bigger and have had more ethnic groups living there, so the segregation on a social scale was more visible. In the South, it was simply black and white.
I see where you're coming from. I'm not sure what your race is or where you lived in the Pacific Northwest...but let's just say you are black and lived in Portland, which is a pretty white city. If all of a sudden, the population in Portland became 50% black, I think you would be witnessing a lot more discrimination toward you in that town. That's the point I'm trying to make. A few blacks in a largely white area are generally not "threatening" to white people. But when an area tips largely toward one ethnic group, many white people get uncomfortable and you see a lot more racial incidents. And it's not uncommon for Southern towns to have black populations of 30%, 40%, 50% or more.
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Old 12-28-2007, 11:11 AM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,609,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pirate_lafitte View Post
I am living in the South and some of my worst incidents with racial prejudice have been in the South. I had no problems while living in the Pacific Northwest.
As for blacks and whites "getting along" in the South, I believe that was only so provided blacks didn't overstep their boundaries and there was an implicit "know your place" attitude. Historically, that is what has happened.
Segregation in big cities, however, exists everywhere, whether it's New York or Chicago, or Atlanta or Dallas or San Francisco. It's all over. The difference is that in Chicago and New York, both places are bigger and have had more ethnic groups living there, so the segregation on a social scale was more visible. In the South, it was simply black and white.
Not so in Houston, which is very very diverse and hardly segregated.

Even outside of this city, there isn't really a big problem of black and white racism, nowadays. A lot of racism in the south seems to be directed towards some foreigners. Still, nobody here "knows their place." No one here accepts any injustice. Blacks, along with all other minorities demand the same respect and fairness that everybody else gets.

For the most part, racism is more of a taboo in the south than it is anywhere else.
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Old 12-28-2007, 02:43 PM
 
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I moved to the South from Chicago, and I was prepared to see a lot more racism than I actually witnessed.

Birmingham remains fairly segregated. At the same time, the working environment seems to be a lot more harmonious than what I saw in Chicago. And, ten years later, I've yet to hear a racial epithet. In fact, when I went home to Chicago for Thanksgiving, I was shocked to hear the racial slurs flying around my Uncle's table. I just had become so used to a different, and oddly more tolerant attitude in the deep South.
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Old 12-28-2007, 02:48 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 10,609,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
I moved to the South from Chicago, and I was prepared to see a lot more racism than I actually witnessed.

Birmingham remains fairly segregated. At the same time, the working environment seems to be a lot more harmonious than what I saw in Chicago. And, ten years later, I've yet to hear a racial epithet. In fact, when I went home to Chicago for Thanksgiving, I was shocked to hear the racial slurs flying around my Uncle's table. I just had become so used to a different, and oddly more tolerant attitude in the deep South.
That's why education is important. Not trying to offend you, but anyone who makes an effort to really observe the south of 2007 would not be surprised to find that there aren't many race problems down here.
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Old 12-28-2007, 02:51 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 45,211,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
That's why education is important. Not trying to offend you, but anyone who makes an effort to really observe the south of 2007 would not be surprised to find that there aren't many race problems down here.
None taken. My wife practically had to be forced onto the plane at gunpoint when we flew down for the interview. Now, ten years later, she refuses to even think of leaving.

Yet, when we moved here, all our friends dragged out all the stereotypes, and just knew we would encounter the Klan on every street corner. Then they all started to visit on the way to the beach. Next thing we knew, three different couples started looking for jobs here.

Birmingham is kind of a hidden jewel. Not at all what we expected.
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Old 12-29-2007, 11:13 AM
 
222 posts, read 621,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpope409 View Post
Yeah, Nigerians and Kenyans maybe, but Jamaicans are usually grouped with American Blacks since their lifestyles are similar to that of our own. It's a crying shame what people are having to put up with. I blame the media, lol.
For the most part Jamicans would never consider themselves like black americans. In almost every country the most unspeakable thing in the world to be is a Black American.

New York State (pick a city) and Detroit are very segregated
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Old 12-29-2007, 02:44 PM
 
194 posts, read 213,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khayla007 View Post
For the most part Jamicans would never consider themselves like black americans. In almost every country the most unspeakable thing in the world to be is a Black American.

New York State (pick a city) and Detroit are very segregated
Funny how most of those countries are third world Moderator cut: inappropriate language that could only dream of attaining a Black American standard of living.

Last I checked, no one was flocking to Kingston, Haiti, Domincan Republic, India, or Tijuana to live.

BTW, I'm guessing society doesn't consider all those West Indian drug dealers in Flatbush, Crown Heights, Northeast Bronx, and Miami to be Black American, either.

Last edited by autumngal; 09-07-2008 at 06:04 AM..
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