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Old 09-17-2012, 10:41 AM
 
9,600 posts, read 10,967,710 times
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Cities all across the country are trying to make them-selves friendlier to car free living. Subway and Light rail lines are under construction or planned all over the country to facilitate this change. Development is catering to walkable communities and connectivity is a driving factor in most cities. Predict the top 10 best car free living cities in 2020. Use current and future infrastructure to determine your rankings. I didn't include commuter rail in this since commuter rail is used mainly for commuting and not for car free living in almost every city in the nation except maybe parts of NYC. The headways are too long typically for car free living for commuter rail alone.


There are way to many bus agencies for each metro to list them so here is a link to the bus data to analize if you want to.

Most Recent Data Q2 2012 Ridership Report:
http://www.apta.com/resources/statistics/Documents/Ridership/2012-q2-ridership-APTA.pdf


New York

Heavy Rail Subway = MTA 8,420,500 million daily riders [color=blue]+4.39% YTD
Heavy Rail Subway = MTA 16,300 thousand daily riders [color=blue]+1.58% YTD
Heavy Rail Subway = PATH 262,200 thousand daily riders +3.69% YTD

Washington
Heavy Rail Subway = WMATA1,027,600[million daily riders
+1.54% YTD


Chicago

Heavy Rail Subway = CTA 737,900 thousand daily riders +6.56% YTD

Philadelphia

Heavy Rail Subway = SEPTA 325,100 thousand daily riders -1.77% YTD
Heavy Rail Subway = NJT 37,100 thousand daily riders +2.76% YTD
Light Rail = SEPTA 105,000 thousand daily riders -7.79% YTD

Boston

Heavy Rail Subway = MBTA 538,500 thousand daily riders +3.64% YTD
Light Rail = MBTA 248,900 thousand daily riders +10.21% YTD

San Francisco

Heavy Rail Subway = BART 392,500 thousand daily riders +7.93% YTD
Light Rail = MUNI 158,500 thousand daily riders +1.51% YTD

Atlanta

Heavy Rail Subway = MARTA 223,800 thousand daily riders -4.14% YTD

Los Angelas

Heavy Rail Subway = MTA 151,100 thousand daily riders +3.33% YTD
Light Rail = MTA 184,300 thousand daily riders +11.95% YTD

Portland


Light Rail = MAX 132,800 thousand daily riders +1.58% YTD

Denver

Light Rail = RTD 69,300 thousand daily riders +2.92% YTD

Baltimore

Heavy Rail = MTA 48,800 thousand daily riders +5.79% YTD
Light Rail = MTA 28,500 thousand daily riders +1.84% YTD

Dallas

Light Rail = DART 74,200 thousand daily riders -0.58% YTD

Miami

Heavy Rail = MDT 62,900 thousand daily riders +1.95% YTD




Highest Transit Usage


1. New York, New York - 55.66% NYC
2. Jersey City, New Jersey - 45.82% NYC
3. Washington, D.C. - 38.30% DC
4. San Francisco, California - 34.05% San Fran
5. Boston, Massachusetts - 32.82% Boston
6. Arlington, Virginia - 28.54% DC
7. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - 27.19% Philly
8. Cambridge, Massachusetts - 26.60% Boston
9. Newark, New Jersey - 26.50%
10. Chicago, Illinois - 26.50% Chicago
11. Yonkers, New York - 24.95% NYC
12. Daly City, California - 21.45% San Fran
13. Hartford, Connecticut - 21.19%
14. Alexandria, Virginia - 21.12% DC
15. Seattle, Washington - 18.19%
16. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - 18.03%
17. Baltimore, Maryland - 17.64% 18. Berkeley, California - 17.36%
19. Oakland, California - 17.21%
20. Minneapolis, Minnesota - 15.18%
21. East Los Angeles, California - 14.85%
22. Buffalo, New York - 13.74%
23. Edison, New Jersey - 13.08%
24. New Haven, Connecticut - 13.03%
25. Richmond, California - 12.93%
26. Elizabeth, New Jersey - 12.37%
27. Paterson, New Jersey - 12.14%
28. Portland, Oregon - 12.07%
29. Stamford, Connecticut - 11.95%
30. Atlanta, Georgia - 11.43%
31. Los Angeles, California - 11.16%
32. St. Louis, Missouri - 11.03%
33. Bellevue, Washington - 10.78%
34. Bridgeport, Connecticut - 10.53%
35. Miami, Florida - 10.52%
36. Concord, California - 10.37%
37. Honolulu, Hawaii - 10.32%
38. Fremont, California - 10.30%
39. Naperville, Illinois - 10.15%
40. Cleveland, Ohio - 9.84%
41. San Juan, Puerto Rico - 9.46%
42. Ann Arbor, Michigan - 9.00%
43. St. Paul, Minnesota - 8.72%
44. Madison, Wisconsin - 8.57%
45. Providence, Rhode Island - 8.42%
46. Cincinnati, Ohio - 8.29%
47. Milwaukee, Wisconsin - 7.94%
48. Gresham, Oregon - 7.48%
49. New Orleans, Louisiana - 7.30%
50. Rochester, New York - 6.83%

Source:
List of U.S. cities with high transit ridership - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by MDAllstar; 09-17-2012 at 12:10 PM..
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Old 09-17-2012, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,624,653 times
Reputation: 3941
When you say "regions", do you mean which will have the most walkable region taking the entire area into context or is the core city more significantly weighted?

For example, Boston is a very easy city to live car-free, so if we are going by the second criteria, I would rank it pretty highly. However, taking the entire region into perspective, Boston's disconnected low-density towns and suburbs would significantly hurt where I would place it.

Not sure if that makes any sense. I guess I am asking how much weight should the suburbs have?
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Old 09-17-2012, 10:56 AM
 
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Is this ease of living in one of these areas car free, or the number of people living car free in these areas?
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Old 09-17-2012, 11:04 AM
 
Location: The City
21,973 posts, read 30,945,482 times
Reputation: 7498
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
When you say "regions", do you mean which will have the most walkable region taking the entire area into context or is the core city more significantly weighted?

For example, Boston is a very easy city to live car-free, so if we are going by the second criteria, I would rank it pretty highly. However, taking the entire region into perspective, Boston's disconnected low-density towns and suburbs would significantly hurt where I would place it.

Not sure if that makes any sense. I guess I am asking how much weight should the suburbs have?

Agree and also where are buses and regional rail in the original specs. I guess the percentage is probably better further down

But to your point the real answer is specific to neighborhood and individual needs and not any metro on the whole typically, alll metros are too diffuse to compare
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:14 PM
 
9,600 posts, read 10,967,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Agree and also where are buses and regional rail in the original specs. I guess the percentage is probably better further down

But to your point the real answer is specific to neighborhood and individual needs and not any metro on the whole typically, alll metros are too diffuse to compare
If you refer to the original post, I answered this already.

I didn't include commuter rail in this since commuter rail is used mainly for commuting and not for car free living in almost every city in the nation except maybe parts of NYC. The headways are too long typically for car free living for commuter rail alone.


There are way to many bus agencies for each metro to list them so here is a link to the bus data to analize if you want to.

Most Recent Data Q2 2012 Ridership Report:
http://www.apta.com/resources/statistics/Documents/Ridership/2012-q2-ridership-APTA.pdf
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:18 PM
 
9,600 posts, read 10,967,710 times
Reputation: 2145
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
When you say "regions", do you mean which will have the most walkable region taking the entire area into context or is the core city more significantly weighted?

For example, Boston is a very easy city to live car-free, so if we are going by the second criteria, I would rank it pretty highly. However, taking the entire region into perspective, Boston's disconnected low-density towns and suburbs would significantly hurt where I would place it.

Not sure if that makes any sense. I guess I am asking how much weight should the suburbs have?

This is more about city limits and inner suburbs like Arlington(DC)/Cambridge(Boston)/Camden(Philly)/Jersey City(NYC) etc.
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,624,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
This is more about city limits and inner suburbs like Arlington(DC)/Cambridge(Boston)/Camden(NJ)/Jersey City(NYC) etc.
Ok.

I don't think it is going to change much from where it currently is...

Here is my best guess:

1. NYC
2. DC
3. Chicago
4. Philadelphia / Boston
6. San Francisco
7. Los Angeles
8. Baltimore / Portland
10. Atlanta

Seattle is my honorable mention. 4-7 could be variable depending on personal situations - all are in the same ballpark. By 2020 it will be likely that Los Angeles will have a direct connection to LAX (Crenshaw Corridor / LAX Connector - 2018, DTLA Regional Connector - 2020, Purple Line extension to Fairfax - 2020). Not sure that is enough to boost it over other cities ahead of it, especially if they continue to make improvements to their systems.

Last edited by munchitup; 09-17-2012 at 12:36 PM..
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:36 PM
 
9,600 posts, read 10,967,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Ok.

I don't think it is going to change much from where it currently is...

Here is my best guess:

1. NYC
2. DC
3. Chicago
4. Philadelphia / Boston
6. San Francisco
7. Los Angeles / Baltimore / Portland
10. Atlanta

Seattle is my honorable mention.

Don't you think Baltimore has the potential to stay ahead of L.A.? There are some key projects going on in Baltimore and it's already built dense now. Also, Portland is expanding big time as well. What do you think the commuter rates will be in L.A. compared to Baltimore and Portland? Will L.A. be able to pass those two cities in percentages of commuter's taking mass transit? I know L.A. is building a huge network currently.
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:37 PM
 
Location: The City
21,973 posts, read 30,945,482 times
Reputation: 7498
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
If you refer to the original post, I answered this already.

I didn't include commuter rail in this since commuter rail is used mainly for commuting and not for car free living in almost every city in the nation except maybe parts of NYC. The headways are too long typically for car free living for commuter rail alone.


There are way to many bus agencies for each metro to list them so here is a link to the bus data to analize if you want to.

Most Recent Data Q2 2012 Ridership Report:
http://www.apta.com/resources/statistics/Documents/Ridership/2012-q2-ridership-APTA.pdf

fair enough but RR is absolutely a companent. Commuting to work is a huge component of car free living coupled with other forms that serve various prurposes.

If in the city

NYC
Chicago
Boston/DC/Philly
SF

as the tops IMHO probably wont change much for the cities themselves in this time though some specific areas will get better

FTR - I really dont know enough nor have experienced LA transit to apporiately rank it but it appears to be approving rapidly. All the cities I ranked I have fairly extensively with less usage in Boston and Chicago though probably at least 40 times in each. For the others I have lived there and expereienced them significantly
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:42 PM
 
9,600 posts, read 10,967,710 times
Reputation: 2145
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
fair enough but RR is absolutely a companent. Commuting to work is a huge component of car free living coupled with other forms that serve various prurposes.

If in the city

NYC
Chicago
Boston/DC/Philly
SF

as the tops IMHO probably wont change much for the cities themselves in this time though some specific areas will get better

FTR - I really dont know enough nor have experienced LA transit to apporiately rank it but it appears to be approving rapidly. All the cities I ranked I have fairly extensively with less usage in Boston and Chicago though probably at least 40 times in each. For the others I have lived there and expereienced them significantly

Yes, commuter rail is definetly part of all these cities networks, but it isn't used for short trips typically which is the main function of transit in car free living. Subway, light rail, and streetcars are the main rail mode along with bus service to giving people the ability to live car free. If cities want to provide car free living to any area, they must provide a combination of these. Commuter rail is wonderful for long commutes though, but that is mainly reserved for work usually.

Someone would never use commuter rail to go one stop to a restaurant for instance. They would use the subway, lightrail, street cars, or the bus though.
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