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View Poll Results: Which U.S. city has the most historical significance?
Boston 36 41.86%
Philadelphia 34 39.53%
Other 16 18.60%
Voters: 86. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-06-2015, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,589 posts, read 2,635,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 90Cantab View Post
Fair point about lumping the hinterlands in with Philly, very different places. Remember I'm not saying that abolitionism advocacy wasn't as sincere or fervent in Philly as in Boston, I'm saying that the Quaker pacifism and general ambivalence in New York (even back then, New Yorkers though they were too cool to care) meant that a hard "no more slavery" stance was more preeminent in New England, or at least more virulent and aggressive - I mean Garrison was calling the Constitution a deal signed with the deal and advocating for all sorts of wild things by the standards of the time.

As for the slave trade - it's complicated. The majority of slaves brought to the US were done so by New Englanders, and in particular Rhode Island. After the hiccup in commerce brought on by the Revolutionary War, something like 80% of American vessels sailing to the slave ports in Africa were from Little Rhodie. And to add that the only area in New England that ever developed anything close to plantation-style slavery was in South Country, RI. That being said, there was general agreement that slavery was wrong in New England the promise to end the slave trade by 1808 was adhered to without complaint. New England economies certainly benefit from slave cotton, but the big commercial enterprise was actually the other way around. Slave plantations generally specialized in just one crop and one crop only, that meant that everything from food to basic instruments for 19th life had to come from elsewhere. New England held almost a monopoly on this trade, called the "provisioning trade". This is why salt cod/salt fish is a traditional food in many Caribbean countries, even though cod isn't native to those waters - all the food came from New England, which in turn used the molasses from the slave colonies to make rum. And we made a lot of ****ing rum. At the time of the Revolution the two most important exports in NE were rum and cod.
Ha Caribbean cod and New England rum! learn something new everyday, thank you for the insight.

Just wanted to add something I haven't mentioned in this thread.. Probably the most important thing to ever happen in Philly or to the world for that matter..



The discovery of electricity! Well actually historians are pretty certain the kite and the key was actually a myth but still..

Last edited by thedirtypirate; 04-06-2015 at 09:21 PM..
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Old 04-07-2015, 07:44 PM
 
8,861 posts, read 9,067,412 times
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In General Boston and Philly were on the same side of history politically, but Boston's Puritians were more pushy and preachy than Philadelphia Quakers, and it really carries over into present culture. As a result Of Bostonians pushing their ideas on others (or trying) it's produced more leaders in the Senate, or in social movements from public education to abolition to the labor movement.
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Old 04-07-2015, 11:14 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,897 posts, read 9,598,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
In General Boston and Philly were on the same side of history politically, but Boston's Puritians were more pushy and preachy than Philadelphia Quakers, and it really carries over into present culture. As a result Of Bostonians pushing their ideas on others (or trying) it's produced more leaders in the Senate, or in social movements from public education to abolition to the labor movement.
I never thought about that. Its a little off topic but it is interesting that Pennsylvania politicians even today usually do not seem to be as "pushy" or aggressive as in other states. And no Roosevelts, Kennedys, Bushes, Clinton families etc.

There are some exceptions if you go through this list, List of people from Pennsylvania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia , but not as much as you might expect given Pennsylvania's age and population. So maybe there is a little friendly Quakerism left in Pennsylvania!
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Old 04-09-2015, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
183 posts, read 170,474 times
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Philly is the most historical city even in modern times, considering that this city always innovates and starts trends copied by other places (such as Back On My Feet program).
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Old 02-04-2019, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,411 posts, read 3,033,644 times
Reputation: 2345
I think there’s a case to be made for the west coast or Florida.
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