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View Poll Results: Which U.S. city has the most historical significance?
Boston 36 41.86%
Philadelphia 34 39.53%
Other 16 18.60%
Voters: 86. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-03-2012, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,060,698 times
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The first settlement in the Chester area was found in 1641, though.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,444 posts, read 10,183,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
You are right, the Revolutionary Era does seem to count more than other eras. I think it is because it is both the begining of an independent United States and also that the early Americans were few in number and bravely fighting against the odds. We Americans seem to like the underdog.



Obviously, Philadelphia has history after 1800. My point is that as someone who read ALOT of history over the years, I have noticed that Philadelphia is only occasionally mentioned after 1800. I mean this is especially odd considering the city's large size.

As for the second sentence, Philadelphia was founded in the 1680s, but I suggest you leave the 1600s out in a contest between Philadelphia and Boston!
The history in the Philly area goes all the way back to the 1630's. Philadelphia was originally a Swedish colony. The area already had some history long before William Penn arrived and officially named it Philadelphia. It's sort of similar to how New York City used to be called New Amsterdam as it was originally a Dutch colony. So in reality Boston and New York City are not really that much older in history than Philadelphia.

Last edited by gwillyfromphilly; 11-03-2012 at 08:35 PM..
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Old 11-04-2012, 11:12 AM
 
Location: The City
22,117 posts, read 31,375,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
You are right, the Revolutionary Era does seem to count more than other eras. I think it is because it is both the begining of an independent United States and also that the early Americans were few in number and bravely fighting against the odds. We Americans seem to like the underdog.



Obviously, Philadelphia has history after 1800. My point is that as someone who read ALOT of history over the years, I have noticed that Philadelphia is only occasionally mentioned after 1800. I mean this is especially odd considering the city's large size.

As for the second sentence, Philadelphia was founded in the 1680s, but I suggest you leave the 1600s out in a contest between Philadelphia and Boston!

Honestly if anything I would say Philly played a significant historical role in the US at least through the 1960s. Huge railroad city, industrial city etc.

I think you are really cutting philadelphia short to say after 1800


A Brief History of Philadelphia

Philadelphia Firsts 1681-1899
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Old 11-04-2012, 12:29 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 1,508,826 times
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To some extent Philadelphia has done itself a disservice by downplaying the 19th Century city in favor of the 18th Century city. Understanding the importance of the Revolutionary Era, it's still unfortunate that the city has allowed major 19th Century landmarks to be demolished. In fact, the mid-late 19th Century was a very successful era for Philadelphia, as it became one of the most important industrial centers in the country, a place where, for example, locomotives were built. That was also the era where Boston, a less industrial city, started to recede relatively.
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Old 04-09-2013, 02:50 AM
 
Location: New York
541 posts, read 743,521 times
Reputation: 262
Philly.
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
11,341 posts, read 7,997,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
In some ways you could say Boston was the brawn, Philadelphia was the brain.
You could say this, however, it seems to me that what happened in Philly was a reaction to Boston leading the nation to independence.
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:40 AM
 
Location: STP, Minnesnowta
15 posts, read 24,365 times
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Plymouth Rock????
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:22 AM
 
725 posts, read 979,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post
You could say this, however, it seems to me that what happened in Philly was a reaction to Boston leading the nation to independence.
But without Philly in the first place there would be nothing. I see it as, they both were needed to found tho nation, but Phillys history was significantly more important. See it this way: The way the world looks at NYC now, was the way the world saw Philly.
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
13,696 posts, read 15,491,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antdawg1 View Post
I disagree with this. Philadelphia is the birthplace of this country,SF and NY cannot compete with philly in terms of american history I'm sorry they just cant. Say what you will about the negatives of Philly but in american history every other city in this country (except for Boston which is just behind Philly) should bow down and kiss the ring of Philly. LOL I said kiss the ring, I know I'm crazy.

Some of Philly's credentials:-Liberty Bell

-Independence Hall

-Original capital of the U.S./ First U.S. Congress

-Country was founded here (signing of the Declaration of Independence and National Constitution happened here)

-Largest collection of colonial housing in the U.S. in Society Hill in Center City, Philadelphia

-First U.S. Flag made here

-Battles during the American Revolution fought here

-First public school in America here

-First U.S. Hospital, Pennsylvania Hospital (still in operation today)

-First Science Institute

-First Lightning Rod used here

-Electricity discovered here

-First School of Anatomy

-First Medical School

-First Theater

-Life Insurance Started here

-First Slavery Protests here

-First Public U.S. Bank

-Second Public U.S. Bank

-First Stock Exchange

-First Daily Newspaper published here

-First Medical Relief to the poor here

-First Steam Vessel moved here on the Delaware River

-First Law School in the U.S.

-First Carpet Factory Here

-First Turnpike here

-First U.S. Mint here (still in operation today)

-First water company and water sent through pipes here

-First Ink Printing here

-First Carbonated Water here

-First Insurance Company here

-First Savings Fund Society

-First Lithograph in the U.S.

-First College of Pharmacy

-First Successful Woman's Magazine

-Many first Locomotives tested here

-First gas pipes in the country laid here

-First Zoo in America

-First World's Fair in the U.S.
Actually, the first law school was William & Marry and the first Word's Fair in the US was held in NYC. Electricity as it is understood in the modern world as opposed to the ancient world, was discovered in England, which is why the word "electricity" dates back to before Benjamin Franklin was born. Anyway, that's the ones I know are false on their face. No idea as to the validity of the rest of the list.

History didn't stop after the revolutionary period, however, which is when Boston and Philadelphia became less relevant to other cities.
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Old 04-09-2013, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,654 posts, read 7,506,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Actually, the first law school was William & Marry and the first Word's Fair in the US was held in NYC. Electricity as it is understood in the modern world as opposed to the ancient world, was discovered in England, which is why the word "electricity" dates back to before Benjamin Franklin was born.
The poster was exuberant on the law school claim, although Ben, as far as I know, was the first to prove lightening was electrical in nature. Further, unless you have different facts, you are wrong on the 1st US world's fair: Centennial Exposition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
No idea as to the validity of the rest of the list.
Given you got teh first world's fair wrong adn I know many of them are indeed true, I'm inclined to believe the poster on all the other claims unless you provide facts that prove those claimed by him or her false. (lol - Do you truly not believe Independence Hall is in Philly?)

Additional info: In terms of historical significance, some of the earliest glbt demonstrations were held in annually in Philly, pre-dating Stonewall: Joe. My. God.: Afternoon View: Gay Historical Marker
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