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View Poll Results: Will Houston surpass Chicago as the 3rd largest city by 2020?
Yes 473 41.35%
No 671 58.65%
Voters: 1144. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-02-2007, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 68,065,001 times
Reputation: 10063

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdiddy View Post
If "alot of people" truly felt as you think they should, the area wouldn't be growing like it is.
True, but only in a sense. Many people relocate there for jobs, etc. Most people dont move there for the summer weather, Id have thought that was obvious?
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Old 11-02-2007, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 2,458,409 times
Reputation: 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Current News - St. Luke's Episcopal Health System (http://www.sleh.com/sleh/Section004/index.cfm?pagename=Current%20News&PageMD=NEWS%20AN D%20EVENTS&ObjectID=B834AA01-0634-41DF-974B11F581856006 - broken link)

"The prevalance of obesity in Houston exceeds the state estimate of 35 percent."

"Close to 50 percent of 4th graders in Houston are at risk [for obesity] or are overweight, the highest in the state."

Houstonians are fat in one of the fattest states in the country. Stop making excuses. The factors which Men's Fitness magazine highlighted come together to make Houston a haven for obesity. It's not the lack of fitness centers that is the problem in Houston. I doubt the fitness that do exist are bursting at the seams. Many Houstonians are slamming Whataburger down their throats, hopping in the car, driving home, and watching movies in their air conditioned homes with a bag of large popcorn, a liter of Coke, and a box of Milk Duds.
Not true. Houston Among Top Skinniest Cities (http://houston.about.com/b/a/257205.htm - broken link). Also, check this out: MONEY Magazine: Best places to live 2006: Top 25 Skinniest.

Quote:
http://www.houston.org/blackfenders/15AW001.pdf (broken link)

The link above shows that oil mining represents the largest sector of Houston's Gross Area Product. Without oil, Houston would suffer greatly. Stop denying it.
Yeah, about 40% of Houston's economy is tied to Energy. You proved my point.

Quote:
Gross metropolitan product - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It's hilarious that you think because Dallas's and Phoenix's skyscrapers aren't as tall as Houston's, you have a case for anything. Dallas has a larger metro area, has a much larger metropolitan economy than Houston. .
Wow. Nice job using stats from 2004. Here is a list showing the top 15 largest metro economies of the U.S. for 2006:

15 Largest Metropolitan Economies of The United States

New York-Newark-Bridgeport, NY-NJ-CT-PA (CSA) $1,208.1 Billion
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Riverside, CA (CSA) $733.9 Billion
Chicago-Naperville-Michigan City, IL-IN-WI (CSA) (89176) $467.2 Billion
Washington-Baltimore-Northern Virginia, DC-MD-VA-WV (CSA) $465.6 Billion
San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA (CSA) $437.2 Billion
Boston-Worcester-Manchester, MA-RI-NH (CSA) $339.1 Billion
Dallas-Ft Worth, TX (CSA) $318.3 Billion
Houston-Baytown-Huntsville, TX (CSA) $316.3 Billion

Philadelphia-Camden-Vineland, PA-NJ-DE-MD (CSA) $312.6 Billion
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Gainesville, GA-AL (CSA) $242.3 Billion
Detroit-Warren-Flint, MI (CSA) $233.4 BIllion
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL (MSA) $231.8 Billion
Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia, WA (CSA) $201.3 Billion
Minneapolis-St. Paul-St. Cloud, MN-WI (CSA) $186.1 Billion
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ (MSA) $160.0 Billion

Released September 27, 2007 by The Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Looks to me like Houston closed the gap on DFW quickly, and will surpass it next year. Also, look how far down Phoenix is... Hell, Seattle and Minneapolis-St. Paul are much smaller than Phoenix.

Quote:
Phoenix is in jeoapardy of overtaking Houston in population. That has been my claim all along. When the oil industry slows, Houston's population growth will slow, as well.
No it isn't. Both Houston and Phoenix are gaining about the same number of people (Phoenix outgaining Houston by 1,000 people). Houston isn't just oil, and you act like companies in the oil industry are just tied to oil. Many have IT, and other divisions in Houston. Houston has a very strong and growing IT industry (it is actually quite large now). People just don't know about it because it isn't all software.

Quote:
Houston is still a city below many people's radars. Sure it might be a hub of interest for Texans and people in Western Louisiana, but that's about it. Dallas is a much more prominent city in Texas, despite its lower population.
Which must be why Houston has far more international passengers than DFW and a much more diverse population. DFW is mostly black and white.

Quote:
I am glad that you have personally witnessed or counted nearly all of the 150,000 "New Orleans people" (boy, that sounds like an term of endearment) leave Houston. Houston's latest population census definitely showed an increase in population, which is undeniably attributed to the surge of New Orleanians.
It sure is. All Texas cities saw a surge in population because of Katrina, with Houston seeing the most. And the number is more like 50,000. Many left just a few weeks after the storm.

Quote:
Like I said before, Houston is like the larger (overweight), red headed step-sister of Dallas. When Phoenix sneaks up behind Houston, it will give the city a big slap in the head as it surpasses in population.
No it isn't. Houston is one of the skinniest cities in the U.S. (as you can see from the link I posted above). Phoenix isn't going to sneak up behind Houston because Houston is not being outgrown by Phoenix by much. 1,000 people isn't a big difference. You keep holding on to meaningless percentage growth rates, but if you look at the real numbers, Houston isn't really being outgrown by Phoenix at all. There are Houston suburbs that have a higher percentage growth rate than Phoenix, so they must be growing faster than Phoenix.

Quote:
So your answer is no. Houston will not surpass Chicago, or any other city in the country in population.
There are only three cities in the country that are larger than Houston . Chicago is the only one Houston will pass.
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Old 11-02-2007, 06:28 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 12,890,061 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Current News*-*St. Luke's Episcopal Health System (http://www.sleh.com/sleh/Section004/index.cfm?pagename=Current%20News&PageMD=NEWS%20AN D%20EVENTS&ObjectID=B834AA01-0634-41DF-974B11F581856006 - broken link)

"The prevalance of obesity in Houston exceeds the state estimate of 35 percent."

"Close to 50 percent of 4th graders in Houston are at risk [for obesity] or are overweight, the highest in the state."

Houstonians are fat in one of the fattest states in the country. Stop making excuses. The factors which Men's Fitness magazine highlighted come together to make Houston a haven for obesity. It's not the lack of fitness centers that is the problem in Houston. I doubt the fitness that do exist are bursting at the seams. Many Houstonians are slamming Whataburger down their throats, hopping in the car, driving home, and watching movies in their air conditioned homes with a bag of large popcorn, a liter of Coke, and a box of Milk Duds.

http://www.houston.org/blackfenders/15AW001.pdf (broken link)

The link above shows that oil mining represents the largest sector of Houston's Gross Area Product. Without oil, Houston would suffer greatly. Stop denying it.

Gross metropolitan product - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It's hilarious that you think because Dallas's and Phoenix's skyscrapers aren't as tall as Houston's, you have a case for anything. Dallas has a larger metro area, has a much larger metropolitan economy than Houston. .

Phoenix is in jeoapardy of overtaking Houston in population. That has been my claim all along. When the oil industry slows, Houston's population growth will slow, as well.

Houston is still a city below many people's radars. Sure it might be a hub of interest for Texans and people in Western Louisiana, but that's about it. Dallas is a much more prominent city in Texas, despite its lower population.

I am glad that you have personally witnessed or counted nearly all of the 150,000 "New Orleans people" (boy, that sounds like an term of endearment) leave Houston. Houston's latest population census definitely showed an increase in population, which is undeniably attributed to the surge of New Orleanians.

Like I said before, Houston is like the larger (overweight), red headed step-sister of Dallas. When Phoenix sneaks up behind Houston, it will give the city a big slap in the head as it surpasses in population.

So your answer is no. Houston will not surpass Chicago, or any other city in the country in population.
People are fat everywhere. Until you can prove the BMI measurements from CDC data are wrong, I'm not going to believe any list that uses number of pizza places and gyms to determine if a population is fat or not.

Every city is going to have some industry which is higher than the others -- whether it be energy, finance, high-tech, government...

Houston is not in any shadow despite what you think by way of your ignorance or watching of 80's soap operas. Two very different cities with their own unique qualities.

I've read the local news articles mentioning the population decline of New Orleans people from Houston over the months... I'm sure you could look it up on your own.
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Old 11-02-2007, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 2,458,409 times
Reputation: 206
It is getting quite annoying proving miamiman wrong time and time again.
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Old 11-02-2007, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Chicago
4,665 posts, read 8,725,630 times
Reputation: 3105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
True, but only in a sense. Many people relocate there for jobs, etc. Most people dont move there for the summer weather, Id have thought that was obvious?

Uh...I don't think anyone said people move there for the summer weather. The other 8 months however, yes I think that is a draw for a lot of people.
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Old 11-02-2007, 08:26 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 5,947,263 times
Reputation: 1815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guerilla View Post
Not true. Houston Among Top Skinniest Cities (http://houston.about.com/b/a/257205.htm - broken link). Also, check this out: MONEY Magazine: Best places to live 2006: Top 25 Skinniest.


Yeah, about 40% of Houston's economy is tied to Energy. You proved my point.


Wow. Nice job using stats from 2004. Here is a list showing the top 15 largest metro economies of the U.S. for 2006:

15 Largest Metropolitan Economies of The United States

New York-Newark-Bridgeport, NY-NJ-CT-PA (CSA) $1,208.1 Billion
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Riverside, CA (CSA) $733.9 Billion
Chicago-Naperville-Michigan City, IL-IN-WI (CSA) (89176) $467.2 Billion
Washington-Baltimore-Northern Virginia, DC-MD-VA-WV (CSA) $465.6 Billion
San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA (CSA) $437.2 Billion
Boston-Worcester-Manchester, MA-RI-NH (CSA) $339.1 Billion
Dallas-Ft Worth, TX (CSA) $318.3 Billion
Houston-Baytown-Huntsville, TX (CSA) $316.3 Billion

Philadelphia-Camden-Vineland, PA-NJ-DE-MD (CSA) $312.6 Billion
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Gainesville, GA-AL (CSA) $242.3 Billion
Detroit-Warren-Flint, MI (CSA) $233.4 BIllion
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL (MSA) $231.8 Billion
Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia, WA (CSA) $201.3 Billion
Minneapolis-St. Paul-St. Cloud, MN-WI (CSA) $186.1 Billion
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ (MSA) $160.0 Billion

Released September 27, 2007 by The Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Looks to me like Houston closed the gap on DFW quickly, and will surpass it next year. Also, look how far down Phoenix is... Hell, Seattle and Minneapolis-St. Paul are much smaller than Phoenix.

No it isn't. Both Houston and Phoenix are gaining about the same number of people (Phoenix outgaining Houston by 1,000 people). Houston isn't just oil, and you act like companies in the oil industry are just tied to oil. Many have IT, and other divisions in Houston. Houston has a very strong and growing IT industry (it is actually quite large now). People just don't know about it because it isn't all software.

Which must be why Houston has far more international passengers than DFW and a much more diverse population. DFW is mostly black and white.

It sure is. All Texas cities saw a surge in population because of Katrina, with Houston seeing the most. And the number is more like 50,000. Many left just a few weeks after the storm.

No it isn't. Houston is one of the skinniest cities in the U.S. (as you can see from the link I posted above). Phoenix isn't going to sneak up behind Houston because Houston is not being outgrown by Phoenix by much. 1,000 people isn't a big difference. You keep holding on to meaningless percentage growth rates, but if you look at the real numbers, Houston isn't really being outgrown by Phoenix at all. There are Houston suburbs that have a higher percentage growth rate than Phoenix, so they must be growing faster than Phoenix.

There are only three cities in the country that are larger than Houston . Chicago is the only one Houston will pass.
Houston is not one of the skinniest cities in the country. I think I'll believe an article from the Texas Medical Center before I believe CNN or Money Magazine. Sorry. Last time I checked CNN and Money were media outlets, not research hospitals.

Houston STILL has a smaller economy than the Dallas metroplex. My point would be made either way. Next year you may actually have a point.

It definitely doesn't look like Houston's metro will pass Dallas' metro next year. Believe it or not, Houston is not the only metro is Texas that is growing. . There is a difference of 500,000 people between Dallas' and Houston's metro. The Dallas metroplex gains 365 residents every day. That's more than 130,000 people per year. On what basis can you say Houston's metro will pass the Dallas metroplex next year? Uhh, none. As a matter of fact, why don't you focus on passing Philadelphia's metro first.

It is significant that Phoenix outgrew Houston by 1,000 people, because Phoenix has a smaller population than Houston. That shows the people are moving to Phoenix at a higher rate than they are moving to Houston. That is signficant because that means Phoenix is gaining population faster than Houston is. That is significant because that means the population gap between Houston and Phoenix is getting smaller. The only way you can my egregious claims that Houston metro will surpass Chicago in population is because Houston's metro is growing at a faster rate than Dallas. Rates and percentages do mean something. It's the whole basis of this thread, and the basis of your argument.

More than 50,000 evacuees came to Houston. Check any news outlet. It's more like 150,000. There's no way you would know how many people left Houston. You're not a demographer.

With bulk of Katrina evacuees, Texans begin to feel burden | csmonitor.com

Look at the date of the article. August 22, 2006. One year after Katrina. 150,000 New Orleanians in Houston. Oddly enough, Houston's latest population counts were made the same year. Subtract 150,000 people from Houston's population, and the city wouldn't even have two million people.

The few suburbs of Houston that are growing faster than Phoenix have a higher growth rate, yes. They are adding people at a faster rate than Phoenix, and therefore are growing faster. Lord have mercy. If we are in a race, and I am behind you, you are going 3 mph, and I speed up to 5 mph, I am running faster than you. . It doesn't matter that I am behind you. I'm catching up, and if the race is long enough, I will eventually pass you. Basic math.

If 40 percent of Houston's economy is tied to energy like you continuously claim, don't you think a big hit to the oil industry would have significant effects on Houston??

Lastly, I don't care if Houston has more international flights than Dallas. Dallas has one of the busiest airports in this country, regardless. And actually, Dallas has more Hispanics than Blacks. THe city also has populations of Caribbeans, Chinese, Taiwanese, Koreans, Indians, Vietnamese, Germans, Muslims, Poles, Romanians, and Russians. Dallas also has a higher population of gays and lesbians than Houston (9th largest in the country vs. 12th largest in the country. This of course, just being the city of Dallas. Let's not talk about the number of millionaires and billionaires Dalls has in comparison to Houston. But hey, I guess it's easier to down Dallas than to do actual research.

Houston needs to focus on passing Dallas and Philadelphia in many aspects, before it focuses on Chicago.
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Old 11-02-2007, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland area
546 posts, read 2,239,402 times
Reputation: 513
GEEEZ, WHAT'S THE TITLE OF THIS THREAD?

If you want to make a thread about PHOENIX surpassing Houston, MAKE ONE! This is dealing with HOUSTON and CHICAGO. I don't see PHOENIX in there...

Not trying to say Phoenix isn't growing or anything, but this isn't the right thread to be discussing Phoenix.

Chicago will be surpassed Houston by city limits. I mean, the city IS twice the size of Chicago. Not sure about the metro though.

Anythings possible.
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Old 11-02-2007, 08:56 PM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 5,947,263 times
Reputation: 1815
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHICAGOLAND92 View Post
GEEEZ, WHAT'S THE TITLE OF THIS THREAD?

If you want to make a thread about PHOENIX surpassing Houston, MAKE ONE! This is dealing with HOUSTON and CHICAGO. I don't see PHOENIX in there...

Not trying to say Phoenix isn't growing or anything, but this isn't the right thread to be discussing Phoenix.

Chicago will be surpassed Houston by city limits. I mean, the city IS twice the size of Chicago. Not sure about the metro though.

Anythings possible.
I merely claimed the Houston was not going to surpass Chicago, gave reasons why. Then people started to argue about how much greater Houston is than Phoenix. Sorry they hijacked the thread.
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Old 11-02-2007, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 2,458,409 times
Reputation: 206
^^Oh please. Don't try to play innocent.
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Old 11-02-2007, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 2,458,409 times
Reputation: 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Houston is not one of the skinniest cities in the country. I think I'll believe an article from the Texas Medical Center before I believe CNN or Money Magazine. Sorry. Last time I checked CNN and Money were media outlets, not research hospitals.
You go ahead and believe that.

Quote:
Houston STILL has a smaller economy than the Dallas metroplex. My point would be made either way. Next year you may actually have a point.
By just two billion. DFW is about 600,000 larger than Houston and Houston is about to surpass its GDP.

Quote:
It definitely doesn't look like Houston's metro will pass Dallas' metro next year. Believe it or not, Houston is not the only metro is Texas that is growing. . There is a difference of 500,000 people between Dallas' and Houston's metro. The Dallas metroplex gains 365 residents every day. That's more than 130,000 people per year. On what basis can you say Houston's metro will pass the Dallas metroplex next year? Uhh, none. As a matter of fact, why don't you focus on passing Philadelphia's metro first.
Who said Houston was going to pass DFW? Regardless, Houston has been growing faster (meaning more people) than DFW since 2002. DFW just had a big year in 2001, which is why it is seen as growing faster than Houston from 2001-2006.

Quote:
It is significant that Phoenix outgrew Houston by 1,000 people, because Phoenix has a smaller population than Houston. That shows the people are moving to Phoenix at a higher rate than they are moving to Houston. That is signficant because that means Phoenix is gaining population faster than Houston is. That is significant because that means the population gap between Houston and Phoenix is getting smaller. The only way you can my egregious claims that Houston metro will surpass Chicago in population is because Houston's metro is growing at a faster rate than Dallas. Rates and percentages do mean something. It's the whole basis of this thread, and the basis of your argument.
Yeah, the gap is closing by 1,000 people every six years. Houston already has a good 500,000. Calculate and see how long it will take for Phoenix to surpass Houston.

Quote:
More than 50,000 evacuees came to Houston. Check any news outlet. It's more like 150,000. There's no way you would know how many people left Houston. You're not a demographer.

With bulk of Katrina evacuees, Texans begin to feel burden | csmonitor.com

Look at the date of the article. August 22, 2006. One year after Katrina. 150,000 New Orleanians in Houston. Oddly enough, Houston's latest population counts were made the same year. Subtract 150,000 people from Houston's population, and the city wouldn't even have two million people.
Alright, but I have seen reports saying there weren't that many still in Meto Houston.

Quote:
The few suburbs of Houston that are growing faster than Phoenix have a higher growth rate, yes. They are adding people at a faster rate than Phoenix, and therefore are growing faster. Lord have mercy. If we are in a race, and I am behind you, you are going 3 mph, and I speed up to 5 mph, I am running faster than you. . It doesn't matter that I am behind you. I'm catching up, and if the race is long enough, I will eventually pass you. Basic math.
What are you talking about? Do you know what you are talking about? If a town of five people gains 20, but a town of 300 people gains 40, which town will have a larger percentage growth rate? Which will have more growth with actual raw numbers?

Quote:
If 40 percent of Houston's economy is tied to energy like you continuously claim, don't you think a big hit to the oil industry would have significant effects on Houston??
You act like the oil industry is going to go under tomorrow. Anyway, yeah, Houston would take a hit, but it would be nothing like the 80's.

Quote:
Lastly, I don't care if Houston has more international flights than Dallas. Dallas has one of the busiest airports in this country, regardless. And actually, Dallas has more Hispanics than Blacks. THe city also has populations of Caribbeans, Chinese, Taiwanese, Koreans, Indians, Vietnamese, Germans, Muslims, Poles, Romanians, and Russians. Dallas also has a higher population of gays and lesbians than Houston (9th largest in the country vs. 12th largest in the country. This of course, just being the city of Dallas. Let's not talk about the number of millionaires and billionaires Dalls has in comparison to Houston. But hey, I guess it's easier to down Dallas than to do actual research.
Dallas sure does. It is mostly a domestic hub. Also, Houston, despite having about 500,000 less people than DFW, has a larger Asian population (which includes Indian, Chinese, etc.). I guess it must be easy for you to down Houston instead of doing research, because you have been doing it this whole thread. Houston has the nations third highest Vietnamese population and the third largest Nigerian population in the world (outside of London and Nigeria itself). I haven't even named all the others. There is a reason why Houston has the third most foreign consular offices in the U.S. behind only NYC and LA (ahead of Chicago).

No one is going to deny that Dallas has more millionaires and billionaires than Houston (and Phoenix). Really don't see why that is something to brag about.

Quote:
Houston needs to focus on passing Dallas and Philadelphia in many aspects, before it focuses on Chicago.
Houston already has passed Dallas and Philly in many aspects. Houston has been larger (city limit wise) than Philly since 1990 I believe. Its metro area is probably already larger than Philly, as Philly is barely growing. Also, though Phoenix has a larger city population than Philly, it needs to try to focus on passing the Twin Cities, which are half its size, in GDP.
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