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View Poll Results: Will Houston surpass Chicago as the 3rd largest city by 2020?
Yes 492 41.62%
No 690 58.38%
Voters: 1182. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-08-2015, 10:36 PM
 
126 posts, read 168,616 times
Reputation: 172

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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
You do understand CHICAGO IS A MATURE CITY? Meaning it has grown in land as large as it will be and virtually all its land WAS ALREADY UTILIZED.
In the 50's Chicago had over 3,698,962 residents, however today is short by about a million residents, on top of that Chicago has been losing population continuously for decades, luckily last year it managed to gain 82 residents. Chicago has been suffering from a massive outflow of its native population that has been replaced by poor third world immigrants, they are hard working by the way.

You say that "Chicago is a mature city and all the land has been utilized" that does not make any sense, the real story is that new houses are not going up and lots of older houses got bulldozed.
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Old 08-09-2015, 12:20 AM
 
Location: Florida
5,816 posts, read 2,707,356 times
Reputation: 7038
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTallest View Post
Houston is like 50 miles inland... Miami on the other hand...
Has the strongest building codes in the US when it comes to Hurricanes and also has a gargantuan canal Flood control system through out it's metropolitan area and the Everglades.

Houston on the "other hand" still floods 50 miles inland!...Ahem!
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Old 08-09-2015, 08:50 AM
Status: "Get off my cloud !" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
5,076 posts, read 4,911,039 times
Reputation: 4169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobdreamz View Post
Has the strongest building codes in the US when it comes to Hurricanes and also has a gargantuan canal Flood control system through out it's metropolitan area and the Everglades.

Houston on the "other hand" still floods 50 miles inland!...Ahem!
Florida doesn't flood ?

Miami under water: Severe thunderstorms flood streets

Roads Flooded In Downtown Orlando By Heavy Rain | www.wftv.com

50 structures flooded, $1.5M in damage, Port Orange officials say | Weather - Home

Gov. Rick Scott tours Pasco County flooding | News - Home

These news reports look almost identical to coverage of similar types of flooding in the Houston area.

Overall the Hurricane risk of the Texas coast pales in comparison to what Florida has. This is not to say Florida is not a great place to live but it seems that people try to make a bigger deal of the tropical risk of the Texas coast and downplay the more significant risk in other areas of the country.

Last edited by Jack Lance; 08-09-2015 at 09:02 AM..
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Old 08-09-2015, 12:02 PM
 
598 posts, read 430,705 times
Reputation: 641
Okay, this isn't about Miami.

And I do think Chicago will see a resurgence like NY did.
Things will settle and Chicago will start gaining population again. It is a fine city. It had an awesome downtown. The winters take some getting used to, but many don't mind the chill.

I think people are giving up on Chicago too easily
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Old 08-09-2015, 01:30 PM
 
273 posts, read 285,235 times
Reputation: 326
I think the question might be - will oil continue to be the dominant energy source for the foreseeable future? If so, then at some point in the next few or more decades, Houston will surpass. It is the energy technology center of the world and when oil prices are high, nothing can stop it.

If polywell, tri-alpha, or one of the other so-called dark horse fusion candidates successfully surprises us, then Houston may be the next Detroit.
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Old 08-09-2015, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,795 posts, read 2,558,654 times
Reputation: 1199
I doubt Houston will become the next Detroit. Houston economy doesn't rely on one sector.
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Old 08-09-2015, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,599 posts, read 26,977,829 times
Reputation: 9540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Felt38 View Post
I think the question might be - will oil continue to be the dominant energy source for the foreseeable future? If so, then at some point in the next few or more decades, Houston will surpass. It is the energy technology center of the world and when oil prices are high, nothing can stop it.

If polywell, tri-alpha, or one of the other so-called dark horse fusion candidates successfully surprises us, then Houston may be the next Detroit.
Oil does equal energy. If there are any other fusion candidates that you brought up, best believe Houston will be in forefront. It is the energy capital, not the oil capital. This isn't Tulsa.
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Old 08-09-2015, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,599 posts, read 26,977,829 times
Reputation: 9540
Quote:
Originally Posted by NowInWI View Post
I recall the recent flooding in Houston.....pretty devastating.
Mostly from the bayou's, not the gulf or even the bay and those waters from my understanding receded rapidly.
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Old 08-09-2015, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Orlando Metro Area
3,582 posts, read 5,824,962 times
Reputation: 2335
Quote:
Originally Posted by atadytic19 View Post
Okay, this isn't about Miami.

And I do think Chicago will see a resurgence like NY did.
Things will settle and Chicago will start gaining population again. It is a fine city. It had an awesome downtown. The winters take some getting used to, but many don't mind the chill.

I think people are giving up on Chicago too easily
Bingo. Chicago is great, and always will be. It was great long before Houston had a second stop light in town. This kind of thread makes me sad as an urbanist.
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Old 08-09-2015, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,599 posts, read 26,977,829 times
Reputation: 9540
I actually wish Houston was the 95 sq mile inner loop with a little bit outside of it. The rest of the city outside of the loop will not even have a chance to create a vibrant urban area ever because they have always been suburbs. When I say suburbs, I mean post world war 2 suburbs, not the streetcar suburbs like Houston Heights. The population would drop as well as the artificial status as being the "4th" largest city. But it would be a much better city.
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