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View Poll Results: Will Houston surpass Chicago as the 3rd largest city by 2020?
Yes 473 41.35%
No 671 58.65%
Voters: 1144. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-31-2017, 07:51 PM
 
780 posts, read 1,084,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
Id still rather deal with a hurricane every 10 years or so than shovel snow every year. Thats just me...
That is just you, for sure. Its like saying you would rather get hit by a truck every ten years than fall down and scrap your leg yearly. Some people are so tied to where they live that they will overlook and justify everything; seeing Katrina, Harvey, and Sandy and what people went through is crazy and sad. Snow in the Midwest is a fact of life, but it is certainly liveable and sometimes beautiful.
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Old 08-31-2017, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,288,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justabystander View Post
That is just you, for sure. Its like saying you would rather get hit by a truck every ten years than fall down and scrap your leg yearly. Some people are so tied to where they live that they will overlook and justify everything; seeing Katrina, Harvey, and Sandy and what people went through is crazy and sad. Snow in the Midwest is a fact of life, but it is certainly liveable and sometimes beautiful.
The Midwest has its fair share of disasters. Tornadoes and Blizzards are not uncommon. There is no place in the US immune from natural disasters. That established, should people leave California because of Earthquakes? The East Coast or Gulf because of hurricanes? The midwest because of Tornadoes?

We all live in places where disasters can happen. So I go back to my original point. No snow for me. EVER! I used to live in Chicago. Great city but never again!
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Old 08-31-2017, 09:14 PM
 
1,039 posts, read 1,051,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
The Midwest has its fair share of disasters. Tornadoes and Blizzards are not uncommon. There is no place in the US immune from natural disasters. That established, should people leave California because of Earthquakes? The East Coast or Gulf because of hurricanes? The midwest because of Tornadoes?

We all live in places where disasters can happen. So I go back to my original point. No snow for me. EVER! I used to live in Chicago. Great city but never again!
To each his own, I guess. I lived in WNY and Texas.

Over the last 30 some years in Texas, I lost 1 car to flooding, 3 trees to windstorms, 2 fences, multiple roof shingles and some decking, standing water under the house, shifting foundation, collapsed wall tiles during Ike for some reason - due to tropical storm and hurricane effects. I have had to dig ditches to relieve drainage from flooding yard in the middle of a storm, and set up pumps to protect my house from collecting water. Many neighbors and friends have lost homes in floods (some twice), storm surges (1 totally swept away and 1 gutted by waves), and pets during the 23 hour Rita evacuation. 3 years ago I even lost several trees during the drought when it wasn't storming. My insurance was 5 times the cost of insurance in WNY, and I did not even live directly along the coast. I evacuated the city at least 4 times with my family and pets during mandatory evacuations, but I have since moved further inland where I only need to worry about local flooding and wind (see damage above). Several current and former co-workers this week were trapped in their attics, are currently either flooded out of their homes, or currently cleaning and gutting damaged homes. My wife's old neighborhood is predicted to be flooded for weeks. At least this week I only had to clean up broken branches, shovel back gravel from my driveway that washed out, and struggle with opening and closing my house doors which have shifted and swollen from the rain and humidity. Thankfully none of the 100+ tornado warnings impacted us this week, as during Ike multiple 80+ year-old trees were downed in my neighborhood during the storm. And there is another low in the Gulf predicted, and a Cat 3 Irma which could head this way, let alone what may happen next year. But, I suppose I shouldn't worry about another "500-year storm" hitting us next year, although this is the 3rd "500-year storm" Houston has seen in the last 3 years.

In WNY I missed a few days of school and work during snow days. When it was cold I put on an extra layer of clothes.

I don't personally know a single person who ever lost a home, car, or was injured or suffered a financial or property loss as a result of snow, but I do personally know dozens, if not hundreds of people who have been injured and damaged by Houston climate and weather.
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Old 08-31-2017, 09:25 PM
 
2,302 posts, read 1,066,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
The Midwest has its fair share of disasters. Tornadoes and Blizzards are not uncommon. There is no place in the US immune from natural disasters. That established, should people leave California because of Earthquakes? The East Coast or Gulf because of hurricanes? The midwest because of Tornadoes?

We all live in places where disasters can happen. So I go back to my original point. No snow for me. EVER! I used to live in Chicago. Great city but never again!
You keep coming back to snow...... we get it you hat it and it means the Midwest is a lessor region because of it and Chicago. I too lived in Chicago and knew all variety of winters. But I have them by me too. Chicago is NOT PRONE TO DISASTERS. A Tornado in the city is rare indeed. The city raised itself (in parts literally) out of a swamp and is still constructing its Deep-Tunnel project to store excess water in storms and released into Lake Michigan. Adding Quarries as additional reservoirs so finally the last basement in Chicago (as everyone has one there) never will have a back-up in a storm.

The Chicago river has a controlled flow with limited run-off into it today. The Lake can rise or drop inches to a foot over decades. It was low side in the 80s high side in the 90s and normal levels now. But no hurricane will cross it into Chicago. Suburbs do have a river tat can flood. There were homes allowed built in areas they probably shouldn't have.

Houston and other areas in Texas should get more homes off of slabs as their ground-floor for a start. Why should any homes be 1st floor on the slab if prone at all to flooding and in a flood zone especially.

I don't know why people are talking Earthquakes and Tsunamis when the thread is Chicago and Houston?
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Old 08-31-2017, 09:59 PM
 
Location: 352
5,059 posts, read 3,480,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
Houston and other areas in Texas should get more homes off of slabs as their ground-floor for a start.
Seriously, this is so ridiculous. Seems Florida is built on a slab too. I don't get it. I grew up 3-4 hours from the coast and we still had a crawl space. Hopefully when these homes are rebuilt in Houston, they rebuild them a little higher.
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Old 08-31-2017, 10:16 PM
 
2,302 posts, read 1,066,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
Seriously, this is so ridiculous. Seems Florida is built on a slab too. I don't get it. I grew up 3-4 hours from the coast and we still had a crawl space. Hopefully when these homes are rebuilt in Houston, they rebuild them a little higher.
These areas surely will be rebuilt. Higher will need zoning or some decision made for a area in general. some foundation so wood and plasterboard are not in some unforeseen flooding. of course if homescare submerged to near roofs? It reasons something thought of if rebuilt? Would they be able to get insurance for floods if nothing changed?

Chicago did this a 50-year plan 40-years in and added Quarries as extra reservoirs. Not saying this Texas or Houston would or would work. But this city did it and not prone to hurricane style floods. But ALL have basements and Lake Michigan some wanted protected too.

Thinking Big About Sewage | Chicago Tonight | WTTW
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Old 08-31-2017, 10:33 PM
 
Location: First Hill, Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Facts Kill Rhetoric View Post
To put into perspective (see below).

Ranking Natural Disasters by their power to cause devastation:

1. A subduction zone Megathrust Tsumani and Earthquake: This is the most powerful natural disaster on Earth and the devastation is widespread as it can consume half the planet with sheer devastation. What separates a Megathrust from an ordinary earthquake are a few key things:

When a megathrust happens, for example, if it happens off the coast of British Columbia or Washington state, there is the distinct possibility you can feel the tremors as far away as New York, Tokyo, Seoul, and Melbourne.

A) they spawn tsunamis, which are active for a period of 22-27 hours and travel across the planet devastating anywhere along the coast and in their path. A tsunami spawned by by a Megathrust off the coast of Washington or Oregon would not only devastate Washington and Oregon but will travel across the planet and devastate Australia, Japan, Philippines, Hawaii, and any other place along the ocean. The tsunami reaches the affected area within 24 minutes of the first tremors and will continue to go on for over 1 day. Tsunamis can range from 75 to 150 feet tall, there is the distinct possibility that if it is a magnitude 9.5 or higher that it can reach 200 feet tall.

B) The earthquakes are always above an 8.0 magnitude on a 10.0 scale and the tremors don't last 30 seconds, they last 5-8 minutes and break the ground open in several places. The earthquakes are intensely powerful, they can knock skyscrapers as tall as 70 stories down and completely devastate a city and the tremors don't stop and keep going for over a 24 hour period. For example, California, which is anticipating its "Big One" is not going to have to deal with a Megathrust because it is not in a subduction zone. The tremors that will activate in California will be at most 30 seconds and the magnitude will never exceed 7.8 and there is no risk of a tsunami because it is not a subduction zone. The Pacific Northwest of North America; places like Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and far Northern California on the other hand are not as fortunate. They are in a zone that activates the most powerful natural disaster on Earth.

C) The earthquakes unleash chain reactions across the planet, including on continents halfway across the world which activate other earthquakes. The 2004 Sumatra Megathrust earthquakes and tsunamis activated a chain of earthquakes as far as Alaska and the Sumatra Megathrust was all the way in Indonesia in Southeast Asia.

D) If you live in a mountainous region, there will be the activation of mudslides and landslides, which when coupled with the tsunami and the earthquake, make getting out of a major populated area impossible.

For those that want to see the extent of area a Megathrust in the United States has over the planet, see this (the last time a Megathrust struck the United States was January 23, 1700 in the Pacific Northwest - they strike every 300 to 350 years):



For those that want to see an example of a devastating Megathrust, see this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_tsunami

For more information on Megathrusts, I encourage all to watch this:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpFyWPTX2ug
Yeah, the megathrust is going to utterly erase huge swaths of the coastal PNW. Even parts of Seattle proper are in the inundation zone. The PNW is gravely unprepared for the subduction megathrust and subsequent tsunami. This 1-2 knockout will be hands down the very worst natural disaster in post-Colombian American history in terms of loss of life and economic damage. This area will be utterly devastated and it is almost guaranteed to happen before the sunset of this century. I see so many old brick buildings around here, they don't stand a chance in the earthquake. I live up on a hill in a newer building that is up to the code seismically, but I work not far from one of the inundation zones.

At any rate, the biggest fear for me is the aftermath. Lack of basic services, total pandemonium. It will be Harvey times 50. I have an emergency preparedness stockpile and plan but who knows what will happen. Hopefully I'm not around to find out.
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Old 08-31-2017, 11:41 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 739,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
The Midwest has its fair share of disasters. Tornadoes and Blizzards are not uncommon. There is no place in the US immune from natural disasters. That established, should people leave California because of Earthquakes? The East Coast or Gulf because of hurricanes? The midwest because of Tornadoes?

We all live in places where disasters can happen. So I go back to my original point. No snow for me. EVER! I used to live in Chicago. Great city but never again!
While no place is immune, there are places that are safer:



If you like an area enough, you should stay there. But Natural Disaster risk is one of the many things you should consider when moving to any area.

The only place I've lived where I was struck by multiple natural disasters was Houston/Galveston. Some of that is that I lived there for many years, but a lot of that is that Houston is higher risk than most parts of the country.

Last edited by Texamichiforniasota; 08-31-2017 at 11:56 PM..
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Old 08-31-2017, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
1,951 posts, read 1,067,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
Id still rather deal with a hurricane every 10 years or so than shovel snow every year. Thats just me...
I wish I had a choice between the two. Where I live, we get both snow and hurricanes!
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Old 09-01-2017, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,211 posts, read 25,908,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Snow is a nonstarter for me. #cant #wont
I know many people that say the same. Not only will they not touch a city that has snow. They won't even consider a city if it routinely gets under 50 degrees.
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