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View Poll Results: Will Houston surpass Chicago as the 3rd largest city by 2020?
Yes 473 41.35%
No 671 58.65%
Voters: 1144. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-01-2017, 11:54 AM
 
Location: The mountain of Airy
5,148 posts, read 4,996,185 times
Reputation: 3418

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Some cities are much better at handling a heavy snow than others. They don't just shove it to the curb but haul it away. Experienced drivers seem to be able to navigate a little better in the snow once they have a few winters under their belt. Some cities, especially in the south, make it worse. I was in a certain Texas town after a light snowfall and the cars were sliding all over the place...partly because they threw sand on the pavement and also because they were driving too fast.
Even in cities accustomed to snow, the first snow of the year generally concludes with people acting like they've never driven in it before. I never understand because when it's slippery and people are walking, they don't run around like they're on a grass field with cleats. Same thing with a car.
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,791 posts, read 12,767,534 times
Reputation: 5454
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Both of which are among the oldest cities in the Country. They have both been losing domestic population for years, and both continue to do so.
People make such a big deal about domestic population growth as if it's special somehow. NYC still grows through one of the largest influxes of international migration in the country. Growth is growth.
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Old 09-01-2017, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,791 posts, read 12,767,534 times
Reputation: 5454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
He's correct; he's specifically talking about domestic out-migration. NYC, at least the region (not sure about city proper), keeps growing because of immigration.

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-a...ntent=51601682
Which counts as growth. Also, the majority of domestic migration to any city is NOT from other regions of the nation, but largely from their home states and local areas.
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Old 09-01-2017, 01:35 PM
 
763 posts, read 359,217 times
Reputation: 1365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
Id still rather deal with a hurricane every 10 years or so than shovel snow every year. Thats just me...
Me too. I'm one of those "below 50 degrees I freak out" people you were referring to earlier.

To each his own like they say. I love being able to escape DC for Houston during large swaths of the winter though to escape the ridiculous cold.

Chicago would be my favorite city in the country if it had Texas or Florida weather.
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Old 09-01-2017, 01:44 PM
 
27,786 posts, read 24,826,396 times
Reputation: 16510
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Which counts as growth. Also, the majority of domestic migration to any city is NOT from other regions of the nation, but largely from their home states and local areas.
Nobody ever said the region wasn't growing (which wasn't even the point); the point was made that domestic migration is in the negative and this was tied to the preferences of folks who move about within the country.
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Old 09-01-2017, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,312,718 times
Reputation: 10183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Clutch View Post
Me too. I'm one of those "below 50 degrees I freak out" people you were referring to earlier.

To each his own like they say. I love being able to escape DC for Houston during large swaths of the winter though to escape the ridiculous cold.

Chicago would be my favorite city in the country if it had Texas or Florida weather.
Agreed. I like Chicago way more than NYC or San Francisco as a city. I like the Midwest real well too. I just hate its weather and cold weather is a deal breaker for me.
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Old 09-01-2017, 02:14 PM
Status: "Ready for Fall" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Atlanta
4,647 posts, read 3,023,428 times
Reputation: 3867
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
People make such a big deal about domestic population growth as if it's special somehow. NYC still grows through one of the largest influxes of international migration in the country. Growth is growth.
Not necessarily, the transfer of native wealth out of the region is a big deal. Growth in raw numbers just for growths sake isn't always ideal.
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Old 09-01-2017, 02:16 PM
Status: "Ready for Fall" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Atlanta
4,647 posts, read 3,023,428 times
Reputation: 3867
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Which counts as growth. Also, the majority of domestic migration to any city is NOT from other regions of the nation, but largely from their home states and local areas.
Yeah, right.

This is about as absurd as your past claims that almost everyone that moves away from Columbus returns eventually.
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Old 09-01-2017, 03:04 PM
 
1,042 posts, read 1,053,855 times
Reputation: 2365
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
Yeah, right.

This is about as absurd as your past claims that almost everyone that moves away from Columbus returns eventually.
It was not absurd in the least, but true and measured:

Harris County TX (Houston Area)
Movers within the same county - 534,060
Movers from same State Different County - 87,951
Movers from different State - 77,766
Movers from Abroad - 46,290

Ft. Bend County TX (Houston Area)
Movers within the same county - 27,775
Movers from same State Different County - 28,607
Movers from different State - 11,981
Movers from Abroad - 7658


Source: US Census County-to-County Migration Flows
https://www.census.gov/data/tables/2...2011-2015.html
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Old 09-01-2017, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Illinois
802 posts, read 459,882 times
Reputation: 879
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
Agreed. I like Chicago way more than NYC or San Francisco as a city. I like the Midwest real well too. I just hate its weather and cold weather is a deal breaker for me.
If Chicago had substantially better weather the metro area would be double its size, which in turn, would make it likely much less awesome.

I will say that we never get natural disasters like they get in the gulf region. No chance I'd live along that coast.

I feel for those people right now. Brutal.
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