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Old 11-20-2012, 05:58 PM
 
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I'll start this thread off by saying Seattle. In the 1970s it was a gritty, mostly working-class port city with a lot of older brick buildings and taverns, and was mostly off the radar in the national context. It had a ton of character and soul.

Take a look at these photos:

First Avenue (Skid Road)

Downtown Seattle

Pioneer Square
Pre-restoration Pike Place Market


Now Seattle is a modern, plastic, yuppie re-invention that still has a lot of great qualities but has lost much of its character (and characters). It's amazing how different the city is now than it was in the 70s. In terms of the look, feel, and the types of people who live there, it is just night and day between the 1970s and now.

What other cities come to mind?
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Old 11-20-2012, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Limbo
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Those pictures are amazing.

They do remind me a lot of Minneapolis and how it has changed over the decades.

Those pictures remind me a lot of this:

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5097/5...06d0d2bf_z.jpg


The new, modern city clashing with the old.

Stunning.
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Old 11-20-2012, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Greater Boston
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Detroit.
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Old 11-20-2012, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
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Ny, ny
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Old 11-20-2012, 08:01 PM
 
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New York
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:16 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Miami. Not only did it grow enormously but its culture dramatically shifted along with its demographics. The skyline is hardly recognizable from the 70s and SouthBeach was God's waiting room. 1.3 million people have been added to MiamiDade County since 1970 and now more than half of the county's residents are foreign born.
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Old 11-21-2012, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
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Most sunbelt cities in general (Memphis is an important exception), though Orlando stands out due to Disney. Also, the air conditioner was still a fairly new thing to have in the 1970s, plus the Interstate Highway system was still under heavy construction. New York may have changed considerably in a social sense, but in an infrastructural sense, still isn't that much removed.
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Old 11-21-2012, 10:54 AM
 
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What cities haven't changed that much since the 1970s might be a better question... Because we're looking at a period over 32-40 years ago.

I was born in 1979, so my memory goes back to the 1980s--but from my memory, the cities I'm familiar with were considerably different just in the 1980s. San Francisco felt way grittier in parts in the 1980s. I didn't visit Portland until the 1990s, but even then it was much more low-key and blue-collar feeling(or rundown) in much of the central area.

The 1970s through the 1990s was really the nadir for a lot of American cities, though at the same time the period now feels somewhat nostalgic since a lot of downtowns felt more low-key and weren't as trendy--and you still had less generic chain stores popping up in revitilized urban renewal zones. Though it was a lot more dangerous--I mean I remember San Francisco feeling a lot more sketchy in parts up until the 1990s--parts of the Mission or South-of-Market or Lower Haight that are now full of fresh-faced transplants, were sort of this dirty, skid row vibe(that still survives in parts) that dominated a lot of the area.

Last edited by Deezus; 11-21-2012 at 11:22 AM..
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Old 11-21-2012, 12:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
What cities haven't changed that much since the 1970s might be a better question... Because we're looking at a period over 32-40 years ago.

I was born in 1979, so my memory goes back to the 1980s--but from my memory, the cities I'm familiar with were considerably different just in the 1980s. San Francisco felt way grittier in parts in the 1980s. I didn't visit Portland until the 1990s, but even then it was much more low-key and blue-collar feeling(or rundown) in much of the central area.

The 1970s through the 1990s was really the nadir for a lot of American cities, though at the same time the period now feels somewhat nostalgic since a lot of downtowns felt more low-key and weren't as trendy--and you still had less generic chain stores popping up in revitilized urban renewal zones. Though it was a lot more dangerous--I mean I remember San Francisco feeling a lot more sketchy in parts up until the 1990s--parts of the Mission or South-of-Market or Lower Haight that are now full of fresh-faced transplants, were sort of this dirty, skid row vibe(that still survives in parts) that dominated a lot of the area.
I actually think some cities have changed more than others. For example, San Francisco - I agree it was different in the 70s and 80s than it is now, but it doesn't feel like it has changed nearly as much as Seattle. When you look at the infrastructure in Seattle between the 70s and now, you see a complete re-invention. San Francisco has some new buildings but overall the street feel is not that different. In terms of the vibe and the people, Seattle went from being an affordable, blue-collar, working class town centered around Boeing to a yuppie, high-tech, white-collar city centered around Microsoft, Amazon, and other tech companies. San Francisco was also more blue-collar in the 70s, but it was also a bustling, urban, cosmopolitan city with a wide range of different people living there. I'd argue that's still a somewhat apt description.

Chicago and Los Angeles are also places that have changed, but not nearly as much as some other cities. What I'm talking about are cities that have undergone truly foundational transformations, in terms of infrastructure, culture, people, etc.. The ones that pop into my mind are Seattle, Miami, Las Vegas, and maybe NYC.

Also, it's interesting that many cities seemed to change so much more between the 70s and now, then they did between the 20s and 70s.
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Old 11-21-2012, 03:14 PM
 
Location: LBC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orzo View Post
I actually think some cities have changed more than others. For example, San Francisco - I agree it was different in the 70s and 80s than it is now, but it doesn't feel like it has changed nearly as much as Seattle. When you look at the infrastructure in Seattle between the 70s and now, you see a complete re-invention. San Francisco has some new buildings but overall the street feel is not that different. In terms of the vibe and the people, Seattle went from being an affordable, blue-collar, working class town centered around Boeing to a yuppie, high-tech, white-collar city centered around Microsoft, Amazon, and other tech companies. San Francisco was also more blue-collar in the 70s, but it was also a bustling, urban, cosmopolitan city with a wide range of different people living there. I'd argue that's still a somewhat apt description.

Chicago and Los Angeles are also places that have changed, but not nearly as much as some other cities. What I'm talking about are cities that have undergone truly foundational transformations, in terms of infrastructure, culture, people, etc.. The ones that pop into my mind are Seattle, Miami, Las Vegas, and maybe NYC.

Also, it's interesting that many cities seemed to change so much more between the 70s and now, then they did between the 20s and 70s.
Not so sure about that. Since 1970, Los Angeles has added more than 2 million in population; the percentage of Latino population went from 15% to 50%; transit track mileage went from zero to 87, and; visually went from.. to...

What cities have changed the most since the 1970s?-la.jpg
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