U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-17-2013, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,732,352 times
Reputation: 7299

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
Seriously.

It's the 4th largest city in the country. Are people really that hung up on stereotypes to think Houston's not diverse in anyway? It's the only city in Texas (I know of) that has a Chinatown... and Koreatown),
- Two Chinatown's (one on Bellaire Boulevard and the other downtown)
- One International District (Outer Beltway 8)
- Two Little Saigons (One Midtown and the other on west Beltway 8)
- One Koreatown
- One Mahatma Gandhi District (Hillcroft)
- One Ismaili corridor (West Belfort and Wilcrest area)
- One Persian strip (Richmond and Hillcroft from Tanglewilde to 610)
- A Costa Rican enclave near 59/Beltway 8
- El Salvadoran corridor near Bissonett and Highway 6
- Too many Mexican enclaves to count
- Guatemalan corridor near Airport Boulevard further away from 6
- Nigerian community down Gessner south of 59
- Pakistani Center on 6 passed Westheimer

Not that I count it but there's a sizable Japanese corridor on Westheimer too but it's smaller in concentration than the others. So I wont count it.

Along with all the dispersed shops, restaurants, prayer halls, clothing stores all over the place, specifically Sugar Land, Pearland, Alief, Katy, and Memorial City. Sugar Land even has it's own unofficial Chinatown (small but larger than Austin's) near 6 and Dulles/Austin Parkway, it's own little Vietnamese center and right behind it has it's own small Little India (both unofficial) on 6 on the backstreet two lights away from 59.

However though, Los Angeles holds the world's record for THE most both official and unofficial designated ethnic enclaves in all of the world. So many Little (Insert name of country here) and (insert country name here)town's.

Ethnic enclaves is something we need more of here in the Washington DC area, you can still find all the stuff but it's not as neatly organized or clustered, in Los Angeles and Houston you have both designated corridors and scattered everywhere type stuff to find. I like that layout better personally.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 02-17-2013 at 10:15 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-17-2013, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,318,137 times
Reputation: 10183
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
You are from LA so you should know the pluses that these enclaves have on the city. Dont overzealously support DFW by putting down Houston.
Rubbish. I am not putting down Houston and it has little to do with Houston specifically.

What is the point of ethnic enclaves? It's a place where people from a particular country go to live or work. Frankly, that is the definition of segregation.

The most integrated places in Houston, Dallas, LA, Chicago, DC, NYC, etc. are not the urbanized areas, they are suburban areas. There are really not many enclaves there, instead everyone lives together.

Thequestion becomes which you prefer? An enclave where it's easy to find things from a certain culture or a culture that is integrated into mixed neighborhoods? One is more user friendly, the other is more integration.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2013, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 27,285,564 times
Reputation: 7567
Quote:
Originally Posted by justme02 View Post
Rubbish. I am not putting down Houston and it has little to do with Houston specifically.

What is the point of ethnic enclaves? It's a place where people from a particular country go to live or work. Frankly, that is the definition of segregation.

The most integrated places in Houston, Dallas, LA, Chicago, DC, NYC, etc. are not the urbanized areas, they are suburban areas. There are really not many enclaves there, instead everyone lives together.

Thequestion becomes which you prefer? An enclave where it's easy to find things from a certain culture or a culture that is integrated into mixed neighborhoods? One is more user friendly, the other is more integration.
Not rubbish at all. You were impling that DFW was all integrated by not having enclaves and by implying that enclaves suggest segregation you were putting cities that have them (in this case Houston).

Fact of the matter is these enclaves are not segregated. There are more nigerians, vietnamese, mexicans and african americans living in our chinatown than chinese. It is called chinatown because of the dominance of chinese businesses.

And you dont know crap about houston if you think the burbs are more integrated than the urban core. The most integrated part of the city is where the center of the population is, and that is west and south of uptown. Next would be sugarland, mission bend and pearland. But all of these are contiguous with the urban core. Like any city there are pockets of low diversity, but even our enclaves here are integrated. They serve a commercial purpose, not a segregation one.

Finally, you seem to escape the point that both me and valentro made. Houston has the ethic business packaged in enclaves but it also has them spread across the city. Its not a which do you prefer scenario like you mentioned. All cities with enclaves have the same ethnic businesses spread across the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2013, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,318,137 times
Reputation: 10183
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Not rubbish at all. You were impling that DFW was all integrated by not having enclaves and by implying that enclaves suggest segregation you were putting cities that have them (in this case Houston).

Fact of the matter is these enclaves are not segregated. There are more nigerians, vietnamese, mexicans and african americans living in our chinatown than chinese. It is called chinatown because of the dominance of chinese businesses.

And you dont know crap about houston if you think the burbs are more integrated than the urban core. The most integrated part of the city is where the center of the population is, and that is west and south of uptown. Next would be sugarland, mission bend and pearland. But all of these are contiguous with the urban core. Like any city there are pockets of low diversity, but even our enclaves here are integrated. They serve a commercial purpose, not a segregation one.

Finally, you seem to escape the point that both me and valentro made. Houston has the ethic business packaged in enclaves but it also has them spread across the city. Its not a which do you prefer scenario like you mentioned. All cities with enclaves have the same ethnic businesses spread across the city.
Well let me start by saying this is not specific to DFW and Houston, those were the examples at hand. I do not wish for this to be another Dallas/Houston thread. JJG mentioned Houston was more diverse/integrated because of ethnic enclaves. My point is that is not a good way to measure integration. Enclaves are segregation. It does matter how many there are or if they are spread across they city, they are segregation. Enclaves, by definition, don't have more than one nationality or ethnicity in them.

A better way to measure diversity is by integration. My next point is that most integrated areas of just about every metro area are suburban. Looking at a racial breakdown of the Houston area by census tract, it's not much different. Even if the address of the area in question reads "Houston", the most integrated areas are suburban areas of the city of Houston and of the inner ring burbs. The one exception seems to be Midtown and even there the integration is more racial than ethnicity or nationality. The Houston area is highly integrated relative to other metro areas. I'm just saying don't use enclaves to prove it.

Yes I am from the LA area, but not LA itself. I'm from a very diverse and integrated suburb. If you look at a breakdown of the metro area, the integration in the LA area comes from the burbs, not the city. Places like Torrance, Long Beach (yes I know it isn't a burb), Cypress, La Habra, etc. is where the real integration happens.

Diversity and multiculturalism is a lot newer in DFW than it is to Houston or LA. That was my other point. Enclaves are becoming more of a thing of the past. Newer immigrants that come many times settle in suburban places if they can afford them. That's why you don't really have enclaves in places like DFW or Atlanta because large scale immigration is more recent and historically they were not big centers of international immigration like they are today. Instead what you get are communities (mainly in subrubs) where large amounts of immigrants from all over settle. Examples would be the Buford Highway in Atlanta, The far Southwest corner of Metro Houston (including Telfair, Sugar Land, and Bellaire), the area just to the east of DFW airport between Irving and Plano, and Central Orange County. The exception to this is when immigrants come to these areas with less.

The descriptions above are more for sunbelt cities than northern ones.

So while you look at this as an attack on Houston, it is not. I'm attacking ethnic enclaves and their use as a measurement of diversity. What is far more impressive are communities with true integration and a large multinational residency. Bringing it close to home, I find areas like Bellaire in Houston and Walnut Road in Garland and Dallas far more impressive than Chinatown in Houston or Koreatown in Dallas. The former are truly integrated and international, the later are just enclaves.

Last edited by Cowboys fan in Houston; 02-17-2013 at 11:50 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2013, 11:40 PM
 
215 posts, read 333,454 times
Reputation: 129
I sense that outside of Texas, the cities there get an unfair rap.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2013, 11:47 PM
 
85 posts, read 120,206 times
Reputation: 45
I think Atlanta's diversity surprises a lot of people. Maybe not Atlanta proper but Gwinnett County.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2013, 12:02 AM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
12,944 posts, read 18,439,467 times
Reputation: 6618
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Milehigh View Post
I sense that outside of Texas, the cities there get an unfair rap.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2013, 08:51 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
12,996 posts, read 17,148,285 times
Reputation: 14307
Quote:
Originally Posted by KillaKlwn8523 View Post
I think Atlanta's diversity surprises a lot of people. Maybe not Atlanta proper but Gwinnett County.
Gwinnett County is my favorite county in metro Atlanta. Surprisingly, it's more diverse than Fulton County, which is the urban core.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2013, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,586,286 times
Reputation: 3941
Quote:
Originally Posted by justme02 View Post
Well let me start by saying this is not specific to DFW and Houston, those were the examples at hand. I do not wish for this to be another Dallas/Houston thread. JJG mentioned Houston was more diverse/integrated because of ethnic enclaves. My point is that is not a good way to measure integration. Enclaves are segregation. It does matter how many there are or if they are spread across they city, they are segregation. Enclaves, by definition, don't have more than one nationality or ethnicity in them.

A better way to measure diversity is by integration. My next point is that most integrated areas of just about every metro area are suburban. Looking at a racial breakdown of the Houston area by census tract, it's not much different. Even if the address of the area in question reads "Houston", the most integrated areas are suburban areas of the city of Houston and of the inner ring burbs. The one exception seems to be Midtown and even there the integration is more racial than ethnicity or nationality. The Houston area is highly integrated relative to other metro areas. I'm just saying don't use enclaves to prove it.

Yes I am from the LA area, but not LA itself. I'm from a very diverse and integrated suburb. If you look at a breakdown of the metro area, the integration in the LA area comes from the burbs, not the city. Places like Torrance, Long Beach (yes I know it isn't a burb), Cypress, La Habra, etc. is where the real integration happens.
The city has become more and more integrated, I'm not sure if the bolded is a true statement anymore (though LA's burbs are definitely very integrated and perhaps still more than the city).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2013, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,001,842 times
Reputation: 802
Quote:
Originally Posted by KillaKlwn8523 View Post
Maybe its just me but I didn't find San Francisco to be that diverse. It's just White and Asian people (who really are nowadays just another variant of white people)
That's definitely not fair.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top