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Old 02-20-2013, 09:25 AM
 
Location: The City
21,941 posts, read 30,763,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
California has a blk population higher than 95% of states on the east-coast. Only FLA, GA, and NY are the only E/C states that have a higher BLK pop. than CA. Me as a BLK man, I'd feel more comfy in Northern or Southern CA than I would in Rhode Island, or Vermont or even upstate NY, or Middle Pennsylvania, or Western MASS. The NE and the E/C is very "WASPY"
So do you mean the SOCAL and NOCAL cities or comparative rural areas to what you referenced on the EC?

Am just curious
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Old 02-20-2013, 10:23 AM
 
9,972 posts, read 13,998,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KillaKlwn8523 View Post
But what kind of distinct cultural marks do Asian Americans have that's widely different from the average White American?
Seriously? Have you ever been to predominantly Vietnamese or Chinese or Korean or East Indian neighborhood? There's giant suburban shopping plazas in the Bay Area showing Bollywood films, with clothing stores selling saris, and Indian groceies right next to another one with predominantly Chinese businesses. Go inside a Asian grocery store and tell me there's nothing distinct culturally.

Quote:
How have Asian Americans been through the same struggles as Hispanic or Black people have?
What are we talking about? Historicially? Yes--considiering the China Exclusion act, abuse of Chinese labor in building the railroads, Japansese internment, KKK attacks on Asians in the 1920s, the history of Asian plantation workers in Hawaii and so on. Currently, there's a lot of variety even among the same ethnic groups--there's no universal Asian experience. There's a lot of differences between a poor Hmong refugee or Vietnamese person who came here after the war or a Indian tech worker or a Korean small business owner. Just as there's plenty of difference between a Chinese doctor who moves here from Beijing and a poor immigrant from Fujian who basically came here as a indentured laborer to work in a sweat shop. The second generation of kids might end up mostly assimilated--but in the US that's actually a good thing in the long run.

Quote:
Aren't they disproportionately upper class and for the most part, identify with White America?
So we can't count upper class people as part of "diversity"? It's not just Asians as I've met plenty of African or Russian or Latino immigrants that were upper class professionals--do only the poor huddled masses count in terms of having a culture. There's plenty of wealthier Asians who still hold onto their culture--and as far as identifying with White America--they do way better than most of White America...

Quote:
Plus aren't Blacks leaving San Francisco?
San Francisco never had that high of black population. The black population has always been higher since the World War II-period in the East Bay. But it's a typical response on here(common to the Eastern US), where a place can't be considered diverse unless it has "this percentage___" of black people. In general people live where they live in the US due to economy and location, the West Coast was a long way from the South, that's why the black population in most cities is lower. Does every city have to match the demographics of some place on the East Coast or South?

Last edited by Deezus; 02-20-2013 at 10:36 AM..
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Old 02-20-2013, 10:58 AM
 
Location: The City
21,941 posts, read 30,763,117 times
Reputation: 7488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Seriously? Have you ever been to predominantly Vietnamese or Chinese or Korean or East Indian neighborhood? There's giant suburban shopping plazas in the Bay Area showing Bollywood films, with clothing stores selling saris, and Indian groceies right next to another one with predominantly Chinese businesses. Go inside a Asian grocery store and tell me there's nothing distinct culturally.



What are we talking about? Historicially? Yes--considiering the China Exclusion act, abuse of Chinese labor in building the railroads, Japansese internment, KKK attacks on Asians in the 1920s, the history of Asian plantation workers in Hawaii and so on. Currently, there's a lot of variety even among the same ethnic groups--there's no universal Asian experience. There's a lot of differences between a poor Hmong refugee or Vietnamese person who came here after the war or a Indian tech worker or a Korean small business owner. Just as there's plenty of difference between a Chinese doctor who moves here from Beijing and a poor immigrant from Fujian who basically came here as a indentured laborer to work in a sweat shop. The second generation of kids might end up mostly assimilated--but in the US that's actually a good thing in the long run.



So we can't count upper class people as part of "diversity"? It's not just Asians as I've met plenty of African or Russian or Latino immigrants that were upper class professionals--do only the poor huddled masses count in terms of having a culture. There's plenty of wealthier Asians who still hold onto their culture--and as far as identifying with White America--they do way better than most of White America...



San Francisco never had that high of black population. The black population has always been higher since the World War II-period in the East Bay. But it's a typical response on here(common to the Eastern US), where a place can't be considered diverse unless it has "this percentage___" of black people. In general people live where they live in the US due to economy and location, the West Coast was a long way from the South, that's why the black population in most cities is lower. Does every city have to match the demographics of some place on the East Coast or South?
fair points though the same mantra could be used when comparing Asian percentages to WC places.
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:04 PM
 
Location: SoCal
460 posts, read 695,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KillaKlwn8523 View Post
Maybe its just me but I didn't find San Francisco to be that diverse. It's just White and Asian people (who really are nowadays just another variant of white people)
Quote:
Originally Posted by KillaKlwn8523 View Post
But what kind of distinct cultural marks do Asian Americans have that's widely different from the average White American? How have Asian Americans been through the same struggles as Hispanic or Black people have? Aren't they disproportionately upper class and for the most part, identify with White America?
Plus aren't Blacks leaving San Francisco?
My goodness, is that you HugeFoodie215?
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Old 02-20-2013, 07:25 PM
 
85 posts, read 119,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
California has a blk population higher than 95% of states on the east-coast. Only FLA, GA, and NY are the only E/C states that have a higher BLK pop. than CA. Me as a BLK man, I'd feel more comfy in Northern or Southern CA than I would in Rhode Island, or Vermont or even upstate NY, or Middle Pennsylvania, or Western MASS. The NE and the E/C is very "WASPY"
Except California as a state takes up most of the West Coast, and a state like North Carolina is likely to pass up California in terms of black population very soon. Fact of the matter is the West just hasn't been a safe haven for black people ever. As a percentage of the population, blacks in California are severely underrepresented.
I'm not saying its because of racism because cost of living is an issue, but lets be real: cost of living is an issue in a lot of places yet they aren't hemorraging black people like California is.
Quote:
Seriously? Have you ever been to predominantly Vietnamese or Chinese or Korean or East Indian neighborhood? There's giant suburban shopping plazas in the Bay Area showing Bollywood films, with clothing stores selling saris, and Indian groceies right next to another one with predominantly Chinese businesses. Go inside a Asian grocery store and tell me there's nothing distinct culturally.
That's nice, but the kids who end up growing up here end up sounding like and acting like the average White American. All the music I ever hear played at "Asian" clubs are usually rap music or electronic music, two things that aren't traditional to their people.
Their ethnic enclaves and stores are no different than finding a German store or an Italian store nowadays. To me, they're simply white people with slightly different shaped eyes.
Quote:
What are we talking about? Historicially? Yes--considiering the China Exclusion act, abuse of Chinese labor in building the railroads, Japansese internment, KKK attacks on Asians in the 1920s, the history of Asian plantation workers in Hawaii and so on. Currently, there's a lot of variety even among the same ethnic groups--there's no universal Asian experience. There's a lot of differences between a poor Hmong refugee or Vietnamese person who came here after the war or a Indian tech worker or a Korean small business owner. Just as there's plenty of difference between a Chinese doctor who moves here from Beijing and a poor immigrant from Fujian who basically came here as a indentured laborer to work in a sweat shop. The second generation of kids might end up mostly assimilated--but in the US that's actually a good thing in the long run.
But at the end of the day, the vast majority of Asian people in the United States have way less problems than the average Black or Latino. People used to attack the Irish and Italians too, but not anymore. People CONTINUE to attack Black and Latino people. They aren't minorities in the same way that Blacks and Latinos are, which is why the average middle class neighborhood is more likely to accept an Asian person as a neighbor than a Black person.
Quote:
So we can't count upper class people as part of "diversity"? It's not just Asians as I've met plenty of African or Russian or Latino immigrants that were upper class professionals--do only the poor huddled masses count in terms of having a culture. There's plenty of wealthier Asians who still hold onto their culture--and as far as identifying with White America--they do way better than most of White America...
Then why do most Asian women marry white men, and why don't white people have a problem with Asians marrying them? That's because mentally, once the first generation settles down, they just become another group of White people.
Quote:
San Francisco never had that high of black population. The black population has always been higher since the World War II-period in the East Bay. But it's a typical response on here(common to the Eastern US), where a place can't be considered diverse unless it has "this percentage___" of black people. In general people live where they live in the US due to economy and location, the West Coast was a long way from the South, that's why the black population in most cities is lower. Does every city have to match the demographics of some place on the East Coast or South?
Then why do Asians and Hispanics live in extremely large numbers on the East Coast? New York City is pretty far from China and Latin America, yet it has the largest populations of Hispanics and Asians in the United States.
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Old 02-20-2013, 07:33 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
12,980 posts, read 17,090,687 times
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I just wanted to leave another comment here before this topic is locked.
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Old 02-20-2013, 07:44 PM
 
9,972 posts, read 13,998,145 times
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Well it looks like in the latest round of the Dave Chapelle racial draft the white team picked "all Asian people"... Congratulations, guys, you're no longer a minority, welcome to the team.

Put down that basketball, Jeremy Lin...
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Old 02-20-2013, 09:12 PM
 
85 posts, read 119,841 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Well it looks like in the latest round of the Dave Chapelle racial draft the white team picked "all Asian people"... Congratulations, guys, you're no longer a minority, welcome to the team.

Put down that basketball, Jeremy Lin...
Well, I'm actually not trolling. I genuinely feel that way, and frankly, so do a lot of other Black people I have spoken to.
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Old 08-11-2013, 01:10 PM
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11,386 posts, read 9,831,265 times
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I moved to LA and was surprised to see how diverse it is. Mostly hispanics. I mean, us whites are a minority here. Same goes for the rest of California.
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Old 08-11-2013, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,022,513 times
Reputation: 2581
Quote:
Originally Posted by Code Lyoko View Post
- Two Chinatown's (one on Bellaire Boulevard and the other downtown)
- One International District (Outer Beltway 8)
- Two Little Saigons (One Midtown and the other on west Beltway 8)
- One Koreatown
- One Mahatma Gandhi District (Hillcroft)
- One Ismaili corridor (West Belfort and Wilcrest area)
- One Persian strip (Richmond and Hillcroft from Tanglewilde to 610)
- A Costa Rican enclave near 59/Beltway 8
- El Salvadoran corridor near Bissonett and Highway 6
- Too many Mexican enclaves to count
- Guatemalan corridor near Airport Boulevard further away from 6
- Nigerian community down Gessner south of 59
- Pakistani Center on 6 passed Westheimer

Not that I count it but there's a sizable Japanese corridor on Westheimer too but it's smaller in concentration than the others. So I wont count it.

Along with all the dispersed shops, restaurants, prayer halls, clothing stores all over the place, specifically Sugar Land, Pearland, Alief, Katy, and Memorial City. Sugar Land even has it's own unofficial Chinatown (small but larger than Austin's) near 6 and Dulles/Austin Parkway, it's own little Vietnamese center and right behind it has it's own small Little India (both unofficial) on 6 on the backstreet two lights away from 59.

However though, Los Angeles holds the world's record for THE most both official and unofficial designated ethnic enclaves in all of the world. So many Little (Insert name of country here) and (insert country name here)town's.

Ethnic enclaves is something we need more of here in the Washington DC area, you can still find all the stuff but it's not as neatly organized or clustered, in Los Angeles and Houston you have both designated corridors and scattered everywhere type stuff to find. I like that layout better personally.
Yeah, same here. Even though we do have an impressive handful of 'unofficial' ethnic enclaves throughout the DMV area.

Examples: Langley Park, MD=Salvadoran-Town 1, Bowie, MD=Little Nigeria (I say this because of the sizeable Nigerian community up there), Falls Church, VA=Little Saigon, Annandale=Koreatown, Rockville, MD=Chinatown 2, Silver Spring, MD=Little Ethiopia "2"(I say this because of the 'unofficial' Little Ethiopia on 9th & U Street in the Cardozo/Shaw neighborhood of DC), Chinatown, DC (Not much of a Chinatown these days I know), Elden Street, Herndon, VA=Little India 1, Lee Highway, Fairfax, VA=Little India 2, Seven Corners, Fairfax, VA=Little Saigon 2, Germantown, MD=Germantown, Adams Morgan, DC=Diverse/Integrated Latin American enclave, Arlandria, Alexandria, VA=Multi-ethnic/racial Hispanic/Asian enclave, Mt. Pleasant, DC=Salvadoran-Town 2, and Wheaton, MD=Diverse Hispanic ethnic enclave (Salvadoran, Bolivian, Honduran, & Peruvian). I also just found out that DC is also home to the third largest concentration of "Urban Native Americans" in the country.
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