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Old 03-27-2013, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,406 posts, read 7,568,400 times
Reputation: 7162

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I know, one very HUGE group of cities to compare but I want to compare them for personal interests. A bit of a background, I aspire to see all major cities in America and all 50 states by age 26 so I have little less than 4 years to go. Don't ask why 26 but it was a goal I set when I was 13 and I'm inclined to stick with it.

The above are a list of cities that I haven't had the chance to venture to yet (along with Las Vegas, Minneapolis, Honolulu, Omaha) but I'll save the inquiries about those for another sort of thread.

Population table:
- Cleveland: 3,497,711
- Pittsburgh: 2,661,369
- Charlotte: 2,454,619
- Kansas City: 2,376,631
- Salt Lake City: 2,350,274
- Columbus: 2,348,495
- Indianapolis: 2,310,360
- Cincinnati: 2,188,001
- Raleigh: 1,998,808
- Nashville: 1,845,235
- Louisville: 1,478,637

Anyways, I don't know when exactly I'm going to see these cities but a trip to them all are in the planning phase.

Some inquiries:
- What are some interesting neighborhoods worth checking out in these cities?

- Being a big foodie type myself, what is the city's specialty in foods and what restaurants would you recommend?

- How about stuff like concerts, raves, outdoor music (amphitheaters), live music venues, nightclubs, bars?

- What areas have some interesting architecture and stuff to see, like landmarks or monuments and such?

- What about some areas with scenery? Now I'm only willing to explore scenery if it's immediately accessible in the city, otherwise I could just look up pictures on Google images and see those, same deal. I'm not a scenery person but if it's nearby and accessible then might as well spend like 20 minutes on a drive through some hills or something.

- How about some water related activities? Boating, jet skiing, swimming, stuff like this?

- Some museums, theaters, natural science planetariums, zoos, aquariums, or public park places you could recommend?

- If they have a basketball team (NBA) then would you recommend I go to a game? If so, what could I expect out of the arena and the area around the arena?

- I'm also a skyscraper fanatic, where in the city can I get the best view of a skyline shot? I love to take pictures of skylines and add them to my "American cities I have been to collection" and I'm a perfectionist when it comes to skylines, best place to take the most breathtaking shot.

- What can I expect out of the roads in these cities? I ask because if I'm told they're not so great then I'm not going to volunteer my car for these trips, my friend that I do majority of these travels with will have to use his. I'm alright with flying but in all honesty with 4 years left to reaching my goal, I'd rather get with four friends and do a cross country road trip because that's exciting and I can knock out several cities and states in the same time. For example, Indianapolis/Louisville/Cincinnati/Columbus/Cleveland/Pittsburgh can all be done in one trip and Raleigh/Charlotte/Nashville in another, that only leaves Kansas City/Omaha, Las Vegas, Minneapolis, Salt Lake City, and Honolulu remaining.

I think for now these inquiries should suffice, I'll ask more if I remember more things that I'm interested in. Also which city would you recommend seeing the most? The most fun and unique and special of them all? There's no determent though, so no worries, I plan on seeing them all either way but curious to see if there's an agreed majority pick for the most "fun" one here.

Please feel free to compare them in any which way you'd like and photos are more than welcome (so long as they are yours, if not just post a link to them).

Thanks in advance guys.

 
Old 03-27-2013, 10:53 PM
 
272 posts, read 349,294 times
Reputation: 354
Since you'll be on the road when visiting some of these cities, my suggestion would be to not stick to those cities only while driving, there will be some cool towns on the way that are definitely worth a visit for instance Bloomington, IN is a gorgeous town with one of the most beautiful college campuses in the country. About your questions, they're kinda of general so I'll recommend to check out some old threads in every of these cities forums to know in depth what to check out. I know you'll get many people here that will recommend places to vist but I guess you'll find "more" from there especially from the expert locals.

Good luck!
 
Old 03-28-2013, 05:38 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,325 posts, read 3,642,126 times
Reputation: 1713
Quote:
I'm alright with flying but in all honesty with 4 years left to reaching my goal, I'd rather get with four friends and do a cross country road trip because that's exciting and I can knock out several cities and states in the same time. For example, Indianapolis/Louisville/Cincinnati/Columbus/Cleveland/Pittsburgh can all be done in one trip and Raleigh/Charlotte/Nashville in another, that only leaves Kansas City/Omaha, Las Vegas, Minneapolis, Salt Lake City, and Honolulu remaining.
Most certainly, your travel goals are exciting and worthy, but like you just mentioned, do limit yourself on each trip. Otherwise, both you and friends could end up exhausted, broke, and unappreciative of any particular city.

Last edited by JMT; 03-28-2013 at 09:38 PM.. Reason: Removed your off-topic comment.
 
Old 03-28-2013, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,990 posts, read 7,842,048 times
Reputation: 4194
You could knock out most of those cities by doing a Midwestern trip! I take it by your list that you live on one of the coasts? Perhaps in a big city?
 
Old 03-28-2013, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
11,698 posts, read 9,566,260 times
Reputation: 10624
Cleveland: University Circle, Little Italy, Ohio City, Tremont. I recommend the Cleveland Museum of Art, Great Lakes Brewery restaurant, an Italian bakery in LI, a ballgame at the Jake (or whatever they're calling it now) if you have time. Skip the overrated RnR HOF.
Columbus: Short North neighborhood (with great bars & restaurants), perhaps a walk around the campus. Honestly a better place to live than visit.
Cincinnati: Arnold's Bar & Grill (open since 1861 in a great building), Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, Cincinnati-style chili. TomJones or motorman can probably do better here.
Kansas City: Negro League Hall of Fame and/or American Jazz Hall of Fame, KC BBQ, Kaufmann Stadium.
 
Old 03-30-2013, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,406 posts, read 7,568,400 times
Reputation: 7162
I see quite a few of you have some questions and concerns about why I posted CSA's. Here why, when I visit a city I visit everything or as much as possible. That includes good areas, bad areas, suburbs, exurbs, satellite communities, adjacent cities, so on. I like to see it all, thoroughly. The population list is simply the broad population that I'll be within range of when I'm there, in these cities.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
You could knock out most of those cities by doing a Midwestern trip! I take it by your list that you live on one of the coasts? Perhaps in a big city?
Nahh, I don't consider Washington DC coastal because it's not on the Atlantic the way Boston or New York are.

I live in Alexandra, Virginia and I'm still trying to find "that place" for me. Looking forward to seeing all these cities.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 03-30-2013 at 01:26 AM..
 
Old 03-30-2013, 02:21 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,895 posts, read 4,350,386 times
Reputation: 957
Quote:
Originally Posted by valentro View Post
I see quite a few of you have some questions and concerns about why I posted CSA's. Here why, when I visit a city I visit everything or as much as possible. That includes good areas, bad areas, suburbs, exurbs, satellite communities, adjacent cities, so on. I like to see it all, thoroughly. The population list is simply the broad population that I'll be within range of when I'm there, in these cities.

Nahh, I don't consider Washington DC coastal because it's not on the Atlantic the way Boston or New York are.

I live in Alexandra, Virginia and I'm still trying to find "that place" for me. Looking forward to seeing all these cities.
Well Indianapolis would make an easy weekend getaway vacation for a low price and tons to do.
Worlds Largest Children's Museum.
The Indianapolis 500 hall of fame museum at the speedway.
The free Indianapolis Museum of art. one of the top 10 in the country and the 100 acres cant be beat.
Official Tourism Site of Indianapolis | Visit Indy has a comprehensive list of things to do in Indianapolis.
Plus a Forbes writer wrote this that you should read. Great Urban Weekend Escapes: Indianapolis - Forbes
 
Old 03-30-2013, 08:25 AM
 
3,008 posts, read 4,135,210 times
Reputation: 1524
Op wants the entire gambit. Visit every city and let the locals direct you to the far off places. Save a lot of time that way. Every place has its pros and cons
 
Old 03-30-2013, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,046,055 times
Reputation: 687
Columbus is great for foodies (especially in the urban core), its younger club scenes (especially live alternative music scene), and the short north arts district with lots of restaurants/music/shops/bars all on a historic neighborhood strip lined with interesting urban neighborhoods.

For theatres the Ohio Theater is beautiful landmark
 
Old 04-02-2013, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
3,813 posts, read 4,194,141 times
Reputation: 3909
My answers will be for Indianapolis:

Quote:
Originally Posted by valentro View Post
I know, one very HUGE group of cities to compare but I want to compare them for personal interests. A bit of a background, I aspire to see all major cities in America and all 50 states by age 26 so I have little less than 4 years to go. Don't ask why 26 but it was a goal I set when I was 13 and I'm inclined to stick with it.

The above are a list of cities that I haven't had the chance to venture to yet (along with Las Vegas, Minneapolis, Honolulu, Omaha) but I'll save the inquiries about those for another sort of thread.

Population table:
- Cleveland: 3,497,711
- Pittsburgh: 2,661,369
- Charlotte: 2,454,619
- Kansas City: 2,376,631
- Salt Lake City: 2,350,274
- Columbus: 2,348,495
- Indianapolis: 2,310,360
- Cincinnati: 2,188,001
- Raleigh: 1,998,808
- Nashville: 1,845,235
- Louisville: 1,478,637

Anyways, I don't know when exactly I'm going to see these cities but a trip to them all are in the planning phase.

Some inquiries:
- What are some interesting neighborhoods worth checking out in these cities?
Well, downtown of course. That's a given. Fountain Square is a neat little area with a cabaret club and a few restaurants and bars in the old theater building along with duckpin bowling. If you're there in the summer, the Rooftop Garden on the roof of the theater building is a great place to get a drink and view the downtown skyline. Mass Ave & Lockerbie Square are good areas for a stroll. Mass Ave has a lot of locally owned restaurants, bars, and shops. Lockerbie Square is a history neighborhood to stroll and check out the cool homes. The home of author James Whitcomb Riley is here and open to public tours. Meridian-Kessler has a lot of historic mansions and makes for a nice drive. Certain times of the year they have public tours of some of the history houses. And Broad Ripple has a lot of local restaurants and bars and cool little shops.

[Qoute]- Being a big foodie type myself, what is the city's specialty in foods and what restaurants would you recommend?[/quote]
See my above answer. Much of the local restaurants are in the Mass Ave area, Fountain Square, or in Broad Ripple, though you can find others scattered about the city. Those areas have the highest concentration.

Quote:
- How about stuff like concerts, raves, outdoor music (amphitheaters), live music venues, nightclubs, bars?
Most concerts in Indy are during the summer months, typically from mid-May to mid-September. We have two outdoor amphitheaters with national touring acts. The Lawn downtown at White River State Park usually does 6-7 shows per year and hosts the Indy Jazz Fest in the fall. Klipsch Music Center in Noblesville usually hosts one or two concerts every weekend in the summer ranging from Jimmy Buffet to Dave Matthews Band and KISS to Keith Urban. Some concerts are held at Bankers Life Fieldhouse or the Murat Theater or Egyptian Room as well. The Vogue in Broad Ripple is a nightclub that features smaller touring bands and local bands perform at bars and clubs all over town. You can pick up a free copy of the paper Nuvo all around town to find out what bands are performing where.

Quote:
- What areas have some interesting architecture and stuff to see, like landmarks or monuments and such?
Downtown Indy has a lot of landmarks and the center is marked with the Soldiers & Sailors Monument in the middle of Monument Circle. Just a couple blocks north of that is the American Legion Mall and War Memorial Plaza which features monuments dedicated to all the wars the US has participated in. Along the Canal Walk downtown is the nation's only Congressional Medal of Honor memorial as well as a memorial for the USS Indianapolis. One architectural landmark is The Pyramids office buildings on the northwest side, thought there's nothing really to do but look at them.

Quote:
- What about some areas with scenery? Now I'm only willing to explore scenery if it's immediately accessible in the city, otherwise I could just look up pictures on Google images and see those, same deal. I'm not a scenery person but if it's nearby and accessible then might as well spend like 20 minutes on a drive through some hills or something.
Fort Harrison State Park is located in Lawrence, about 20 minutes from downtown Indy but if you don't want to get out and hike down a trail, probably not much point in going there. Eagle Creek Park on the northwest side has zip lines and boating.

Quote:
- How about some water related activities? Boating, jet skiing, swimming, stuff like this?
Your best bet for this is going to be Eagle Creek Park on the northwest side of Indy. I believe they have a beach you can swim at and you can do boating but I'm not sure what you can actually rent. Downtown you can rent paddle boats along the Central Canal but I don't think that's what you were looking for.

[quote]- Some museums, theaters, natural science planetariums, zoos, aquariums, or public park places you could recommend?[quote]
Downtown Indianapolis has White River State Park which houses the Indiana State Museum (history of the state), Eiteljorg Museum of Native Americans and Western Art, NCAA Hall of Champions museum, and the Indianapolis Zoo and Botanical Gardens. The Indianapolis Museum of Art is free (parking is $5) and located about 4 miles northwest of downtown. And The Childrens Museum is the largest in the world and about 3 miles north of downtown but probably not worth it if you don't have kids. Conner Prairie is an interactive living history museum that shows life in Indiana in the 1800s and early 1900s. It's located in Fishers, a suburb about 13 miles northeast of downtown Indy but again, without kids, it may not be worth it.

Quote:
- If they have a basketball team (NBA) then would you recommend I go to a game? If so, what could I expect out of the arena and the area around the arena?
The Pacers are red hot right now and if they still are when you come, I highly recommend going to a game! Indiana is known for basketball after all. Bankers Life Fieldhouse is right downtown and is a beautiful arena. The area immediately around the Fieldhouse is kind of dead. There is a pub across the street but for most things you'll have to walk a block or so.

Quote:
- I'm also a skyscraper fanatic, where in the city can I get the best view of a skyline shot? I love to take pictures of skylines and add them to my "American cities I have been to collection" and I'm a perfectionist when it comes to skylines, best place to take the most breathtaking shot.
Some great skyline shots can be found along the Central Canal, especially at the St. Clair Street bridge. One of the most famous views of downtown is from the Blackford Street bridge of the canal which is right next to the Indiana State Museum. You can also get a good shot from the Washington Street Pedestrian bridge in White River State Park. You can also get some good shots from the north near the central library or on top of one of the parking garages at IUPUI (not sure how easy that is to get without a parking pass). And for a distant view of the whole skyline, the Crown at Crown Hill Cemetery, the location of the grave of James Whitcomb Riley, offers an amazing view of the skyline. During the summer, they sometimes have sunset tours to the top of hill. It's the highest point in Indianapolis and is about 3 miles northwest of downtown.

Quote:
- What can I expect out of the roads in these cities? I ask because if I'm told they're not so great then I'm not going to volunteer my car for these trips, my friend that I do majority of these travels with will have to use his. I'm alright with flying but in all honesty with 4 years left to reaching my goal, I'd rather get with four friends and do a cross country road trip because that's exciting and I can knock out several cities and states in the same time. For example, Indianapolis/Louisville/Cincinnati/Columbus/Cleveland/Pittsburgh can all be done in one trip and Raleigh/Charlotte/Nashville in another, that only leaves Kansas City/Omaha, Las Vegas, Minneapolis, Salt Lake City, and Honolulu remaining.
Roads are pretty good for the most part. Unless you come during the winter when potholes form, you shouldn't have a problem with roads overall.

Quote:
I think for now these inquiries should suffice, I'll ask more if I remember more things that I'm interested in. Also which city would you recommend seeing the most? The most fun and unique and special of them all? There's no determent though, so no worries, I plan on seeing them all either way but curious to see if there's an agreed majority pick for the most "fun" one here.

Please feel free to compare them in any which way you'd like and photos are more than welcome (so long as they are yours, if not just post a link to them).

Thanks in advance guys.
Here is a link to a thread in the Indianapolis forum with several pics of Indianapolis and the surrounding metro. Photos of Indianapolis
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