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View Poll Results: Which metro area is more diverse?
LA 30 27.78%
NYC 63 58.33%
About equal 15 13.89%
Voters: 108. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-27-2013, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbcentric View Post
Yes, see the link below. It is based on the 2008 American Community Survey (ACS, from US Census Bureau). The report was put out by Cal State Northridge (a university in the valley). See page 29 for the chart.

The demographics of the San Fernando Valley (including Glendale) were as follows:

White (Non-Hispanic): 41.8 percent
Asian (Non-Hispanic): 10.0 percent
Black (Non-Hispanic): 9.5 percent
Hispanic (of any race): 42.4 percent

That 68% Non-Hispanic White figure you cited for the San Fernando Valley from Wikipedia is simply NOT right. That is not your fault but it could be that they meant to say 68% White (including Hispanic Whites AND Non-Hispanic whites). Any claim that the San Fernando Valley is only 15% Hispanic is just not correct.

https://www.csun.edu/sfverc/2010Econ...mmitReport.pdf
Yeah your most likely correct on that. I was misguided by wiki numbers so it's my mistake. San Fernando Valley looks more like Queens now. But still it's not like Jersey.
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Old 05-27-2013, 02:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yyuusr View Post
Yeah your most likely correct on that. I was misguided by wiki numbers so it's my mistake. San Fernando Valley looks more like Queens now. But still it's not like Jersey.
Not really your fault. One would expect that Wiki would at least get Census figures correct.

I agree. SFV is more like Queens in terms of demographics than Jersey.
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Old 05-28-2013, 04:35 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,749 posts, read 39,655,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yyuusr View Post
Yeah your most likely correct on that. I was misguided by wiki numbers so it's my mistake. San Fernando Valley looks more like Queens now. But still it's not like Jersey.
To be nitpicky, it's still somewhat different from Queens. The San Fernando Valley is about equally white and non-hispanic white with minorities of blacks and asians. Queens has no racial plurality:

Hispanic: 27.8%
White non-hispanic: 27.6%
Asian: 24.3%
Black: 21.0%
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Old 05-28-2013, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NYC
1,397 posts, read 1,995,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dweebo2220 View Post
The identity of being a "New Yorker" is magnitudes more related to manhattan than being an "Angeleno" is related to the westside. Again, this cultural decentralization/fragmentation is something that is regularly brought up as a sleight against Los Angeles... I'm just arguing that it has it's good or interesting aspects as well.
As a New Yorker, this is just completely false. Perhaps a misperception you have about the city?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmykem View Post
No one underrates NYC, not from what I've seen. And no, I'm pretty sure people do have an idea, but maybe what you think of as NYC being "very underrated" or people "having no idea" is just people who don't find the appeal of NYC or don't think NYC as the almighty.

I can understand why people see LA as the West Coast equivalent of NYC, although I donít think it is nor is it trying to be. What is funny is how some people (especially from NYC, the East Coast, SF, Chicago) are so hung up on where LAís place/status should or should not be and on making sure LA gets put in its place whenever someone expresses preference for LA (especially over another city like NYC
). This insecurity never gets old. NYC may "beat the tar out of LA" in some cases, but there are plenty of things NYC just doesn't measure up to against LA.

As a metro area, LA just has more going on and offers more to its residents year-round than NYC. If anything, LA is the one underrated and is the one that has much more going on than what people usually think. Your very post exemplifies this and how NYC can be overrated.

I will willingly give you guys things out of everyones control such as weather and NATURAL scenery i.e mountains in your skyline makes for a pretty shot, Hills, etc. (regarding "things NYC just doesn't measure up to"). I'll admit the West Coast has a beautiful scene, one I happen to love when I visit. However like I said that's ALL out of our control even yours, Lol. So using weather for instance really isn't NYC falling below a standard or not measuring up. Some of us prefer 4 Seasons (some don't. Like my friend who's a native NYer but moving to L.A later this year.) Some things are subjective and some things people hate to admit is accurate, when they're trying to stand their ground.

Lastly I do want to point out something when you said As a metro area, LA just has more going on and offers more to its residents year-round than NYC. One question for you there. 1. Are you talking about L.A city limits and not your metro? (Which you should be when talking about NYC and L.A.)

If so, how serious are you? I only ask because when people think of NYC they just think "Manhattan", most of the time, perhaps. Which in todays world is completely hilarious at best. So I was just a bit confused as to why you would think L.A offers more and has more going on then our entire city? If you were just thinking about Manhattan then you'd be very disappointed to know the city extends well beyond just that.

I have a thing for L.A that I can't quite shake or explain. I love it but then I don't. When my friend moves there later this year I'm sure I'll be over there a lot more. But for me, It would never be able to fulfill what I look for in a city to live. It's not so much about NY vs. L.A but when you're from a place like NY, I personally don't think L.A could fill it's shoes.
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Old 05-28-2013, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuddedLeather View Post
Lastly I do want to point out something when you said As a metro area, LA just has more going on and offers more to its residents year-round than NYC. One question for you there. 1. Are you talking about L.A city limits and not your metro? (Which you should be when talking about NYC and L.A.)

If so, how serious are you? I only ask because when people think of NYC they just think "Manhattan", most of the time, perhaps. Which in todays world is completely hilarious at best. So I was just a bit confused as to why you would think L.A offers more and has more going on then our entire city? If you were just thinking about Manhattan then you'd be very disappointed to know the city extends well beyond just that.
Well considering his quote, I think he means the Metro area. I don't see why you have to be talking exclusively about city limits - many of Los Angeles' landmarks and attractions are technically outside of city limits (even if they are completely surrounded by the city, i.e. West Hollywood / Beverly Hills). I don't see why you shouldn't talk about metro area when talking about what a city has to offer.

As far as having more to offer year-round, I am nowhere near familiar enough with the NYC area to answer that question. There are probably things that Los Angeles does better than NYC, though more things that NYC does better.

Either way they are the two best cities in the country and also very diverse. Diverse enough that it really doesn't matter which one is "more".

Quote:
But for me, It would never be able to fulfill what I look for in a city to live.
If Los Angeles could get a dollar for every time someone from the East Coast made this statement (or one that is very similar), we'd have enough money to build a subway system as extensive as New York City's.
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Old 05-28-2013, 07:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuddedLeather View Post
As a New Yorker, this is just completely false. Perhaps a misperception you have about the city?
LA is constantly derided (very often by transplant New Yorkers) for lacking a cultural "heart." I did not say, or believe, that "everything in NYC begins and ends in Manhattan." I'm just saying that culture is much more centralized there than in LA.

Wouldn't you agree?
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Old 05-28-2013, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Well considering his quote, I think he means the Metro area. I don't see why you have to be talking exclusively about city limits - many of Los Angeles' landmarks and attractions are technically outside of city limits (even if they are completely surrounded by the city, i.e. West Hollywood / Beverly Hills). I don't see why you shouldn't talk about metro area when talking about what a city has to offer.

As far as having more to offer year-round, I am nowhere near familiar enough with the NYC area to answer that question. There are probably things that Los Angeles does better than NYC, though more things that NYC does better.

Either way they are the two best cities in the country and also very diverse. Diverse enough that it really doesn't matter which one is "more".

If Los Angeles could get a dollar for every time someone from the East Coast made this statement (or one that is very similar), we'd have enough money to build a subway system as extensive as New York City's.
True. More doesn't equate to being better though I took it as if he was limiting the city to witch he's used to as a visitor or what he's seen on TV. That's why I said the city is just more than Manhattan, specifically saying outside of the touristy areas there's still a wide range of stuff to do.

Also I didn't mean anything by saying L.A. wouldn't fulfill what I look for in a city. Like I said it's a love-hate situation. If anything I should've said I can't see myself living there exclusively. Some months throughout the year would be cool. Depending on how San Francisco actually is (I should be heading there before this year is up!) That would be the true test to see which city from the two I would prefer. But if SF doesn't live up to it's hype the first place I'd look at on the West Coast is L.A.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dweebo2220 View Post
LA is constantly derided (very often by transplant New Yorkers) for lacking a cultural "heart." I did not say, or believe, that "everything in NYC begins and ends in Manhattan." I'm just saying that culture is much more centralized there than in LA.

Wouldn't you agree?
To a certain extent I could agree with you. But then again that's a huge misconception about the city as a whole too. Here's a few examples: Where was Hip-Hop (for better or worse) created? When people think of "diversity" in New York Queens and Brooklyn are the two leading boroughs in the city and the country. The Yankees a.k.a the Bronx Bombers, their logo alone, do I need to say more? Brownstones are pretty much synonymous with Brooklyn (way more neighborhoods with Brownstones in Brooklyn than any other borough in the city). Have you ever heard of B.A.M (Brooklyn Academy of Music)? Grand Army Plaza - Prospect Park?

I'm only giving a few examples but a lot of the things (like the gritty New York a lot of people fell in love with and still love) started outside of Manhattan. Though Manhattan also had it's fair share, I'm sure you see my point however.

I'm not taking anything away from Manhattan though. Of course it is prominent and probably the most well known of all the boroughs, especially in advertising, famous attractions, skyline etc. But honestly I don't think the culture of New York is centralized in that one borough. That's definitely not the case.
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Old 05-28-2013, 09:56 PM
 
940 posts, read 1,684,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuddedLeather View Post
To a certain extent I could agree with you. But then again that's a huge misconception about the city as a whole too. Here's a few examples: Where was Hip-Hop (for better or worse) created? When people think of "diversity" in New York Queens and Brooklyn are the two leading boroughs in the city and the country. The Yankees a.k.a the Bronx Bombers, their logo alone, do I need to say more? Brownstones are pretty much synonymous with Brooklyn (way more neighborhoods with Brownstones in Brooklyn than any other borough in the city). Have you ever heard of B.A.M (Brooklyn Academy of Music)? Grand Army Plaza - Prospect Park?

I'm only giving a few examples but a lot of the things (like the gritty New York a lot of people fell in love with and still love) started outside of Manhattan. Though Manhattan also had it's fair share, I'm sure you see my point however.

I'm not taking anything away from Manhattan though. Of course it is prominent and probably the most well known of all the boroughs, especially in advertising, famous attractions, skyline etc. But honestly I don't think the culture of New York is centralized in that one borough. That's definitely not the case.
When I say centralized, I definitely don't mean "contained." As you point out, a great deal of what makes New York great and, well, "New York," is located in or was born outside of Manhattan. At the same time, thought, the cultural "center of gravity" in New York is undoubtedly Manhattan. In Los Angeles, the "center of gravity" may indeed be the westside, but its pull over the metropolis is comparatively weaker. Recent studies (and general resident intuition...) bear out that the area between downtown Los Angeles and Santa Monica is our "Manhattan" in terms of concentration of amenities, retail, and cultural institutions. This may be the most apt comparison.

But even then, I would argue that LA's cultural landscape is more diffuse than NYC's. Los Angeles lacks a "high society" like NYC, for better or worse (one drawback being, as I noted, less arts/charity patronage), and there is much more of a laissez faire attitude. For example, wealth and class are not as correlated in the Los Angeles metro... where it is common for wealthy people to shun society and civic culture and live out some crazy/tacky dream of their own design up in the hills.

One of the best pieces ever written about LA's "anything goes" civic culture is Geoff Manaugh's "Greater Los Angeles" which he wrote on his BLDGBLOG back in 2007:

BLDGBLOG: Greater Los Angeles

excerpt:
"No matter what you do in L.A., your behavior is appropriate for the city. Los Angeles has no assumed correct mode of use. You can have fake breasts and drive a Ford Mustang – or you can grow a beard, weigh 300 pounds, and read Christian science fiction novels. Either way, you're fine: that's just how it works. You can watch Cops all day or you can be a porn star or you can be a Caltech physicist. You can listen to Carcass – or you can listen to Pat Robertson. Or both."
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Old 05-29-2013, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
669 posts, read 690,627 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dweebo2220 View Post
"No matter what you do in L.A., your behavior is appropriate for the city. Los Angeles has no assumed correct mode of use. You can have fake breasts and drive a Ford Mustang – or you can grow a beard, weigh 300 pounds, and read Christian science fiction novels. Either way, you're fine: that's just how it works. You can watch Cops all day or you can be a porn star or you can be a Caltech physicist. You can listen to Carcass – or you can listen to Pat Robertson. Or both."
So just your typical things that happen in Hollywood eh?
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