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View Poll Results: Where would you rather live and comment why!
Seattle area 40 41.67%
Denver area 32 33.33%
Raleigh and the Triangle area 24 25.00%
Voters: 96. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-01-2013, 02:58 PM
 
1,964 posts, read 5,653,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hello_im_sean View Post
I really do love Seattle but im not sure how i'll cope with the cold weather. i don't mind the lack of sun as much as the lack of warmth. As far as proximity to the East Coast.. at the moment i couldn't care less to be honest, I currently live in NJ and im fed up with the high strung atmosphere over here. Denver also seems splendid! But im not sure how i'll fair being land locked in such a dry area. I love green, trees, and water. However mountains are pretty sweet as well
Seattle is warmer than Philly most of the year. If you don't mind the lack of sun, you will be fine there- but I think you underestimate just how little sun there is....
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Old 05-01-2013, 06:29 PM
 
6,612 posts, read 6,539,681 times
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Look at Raleigh hanging in the contest!
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Old 05-02-2013, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
176 posts, read 288,384 times
Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeDog View Post
Seattle is warmer than Philly most of the year. If you don't mind the lack of sun, you will be fine there- but I think you underestimate just how little sun there is....
Well if i don't like it then i can always move again at another point in life! honestly though even as a child i would get all excited about rainy/overcast days. My parents thought it was weird. My issue is warmth, does it actually feel warmer than Philly most times of the year with the constant light precipitation?
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Old 05-02-2013, 10:47 AM
 
7,237 posts, read 12,650,197 times
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If warmth is what you need... then its hard to know if waiting for the Seattle's summer heat wave (which usually happen once during the summer, lasts less than a week) would do for you. I don't know if its really that much warmer than Philadelphia during the winter months. During the winter, the precipitation isn't as light as the rest of the year, its very damp and humid.

That's actually the problem for me. I wouldn't mind a little more warmth, then Seattle had that non-summer a few years back-- oh, that year was so hard to deal with.
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Old 05-02-2013, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
176 posts, read 288,384 times
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Anybody have experience living in the Boulder area vs Denver? is it safe to call Boulder a metro area of Denver? As in theyre more or less the same?
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Old 05-02-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Maine
398 posts, read 1,132,884 times
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I don't live in Boulder, but I would say that Boulder is quite separate from Denver. There is a lot of space between Denver and Boulder, and Boulder definitely feels like its own city/town.
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Old 05-02-2013, 06:29 PM
 
Location: St. Paul, MN
18 posts, read 35,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hello_im_sean View Post
Anybody have experience living in the Boulder area vs Denver? is it safe to call Boulder a metro area of Denver? As in theyre more or less the same?
Their metro areas essentially overlap now, but they have totally different vibes and demographics.

Boulder is... different. In my experience, people either love it or hate it. I was unfortunately in the latter and moved to Denver, which I absolutely loved.
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
176 posts, read 288,384 times
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what was so bad about Boulder? It seems like a more scenic place than Denver. Slightly more upscale with the attitude to go with it?
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:05 PM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Vermont in 2019
9,045 posts, read 17,311,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hello_im_sean View Post
what was so bad about Boulder? It seems like a more scenic place than Denver. Slightly more upscale with the attitude to go with it?
It's nice to visit, great downtown and very pretty city. I can imagine living in the People's Republic of Boulder could get rather annoying though.
http://wikiality.wikia.com/The_Peopl...lic_of_Boulder
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Old 05-05-2013, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
27 posts, read 40,638 times
Reputation: 36
Never been to Raleigh or Seattle, but here are some thoughts on Denver:

As a relatively new Denver resident (transplant from the NE), I would rate Denver as a mixed bag. The weather has been nice (lots of sun, usually warm, when it snows it melts right away), although a bit dry for my taste (skin always dry, ground always brown). The people are friendly enough, but I've been very turned off by some of the politics (the marijuana debate & developing tourism/culture; "border security" & immigration; etc.).

I don't drive, and find getting around by bike or public trans to be well behind the bigger east coast cities. I live in the city, a mile or 2 outside of downtown, and find that the much talked about light rail goes nowhere I have a need to go. It exists to get people living in the suburbs in and out of the city. This doesn't diminish its value, but it needs to be looked at differently than the rail systems in the east. Everyone I talk to (in Denver and outside) always wants to tell me how much I will love how cycling friendly it is here... well, it's not. There are some great bike paths for recreational rides, but the infrastructure for using cycling as transportation is simply not there. The "bike routes" across town are down side streets with stop signs every other block, which means it either takes forever, you switch to a main street without any bike infrastructure, or (as most of the locals seem to do) you run all the stop signs. It's a mess.

Overall, the city life is nice. There are plenty of unique places, although it can take more effort to find them than in other cities (lots of big-box and chains here). Larimer and Blake St. are fun, there are some cool places in the Highlands, S. Pearl and S. Broadway and many more all have lots of places to check out. But be prepared to drive there. Lots of busy intersections making walking difficult, and there are more homeless people on your average block here than in the pit at Harvard Sq. They aren't aggressive, but the sheer number is intimidating at times.

Denver's big draw is the outdoors, and that does not disappoint. Skiing, Hiking, etc. are all right nearby (if you have a car... and there is no ZipCar anywhere here?!?), and there are plenty of multi-use paths in and around town. The real gems are the city's parks. Wash Park, Cheeseman Park, City Park (and many more) are all big parks that locals and use and enjoy. There are enough parks that there is space for everyone, and you don't get mobbed by tourists trying to see them (Central park, Boston Commons, etc). Living east of downtown, the views of the skyline with mountains behind it are spectacular, not something that will ever get old.

Cost of living here is also very low. Rent especially is low for a major city. Food and other staples are reasonably priced as well. No idea what gas is like, don't really pay attention. Getting to and from Denver seems expensive. Flying in/out of DIA is pretty expensive ($400-$600 returns for most destinations on the east or west coasts... even transcons out of BOS were at the low end of this range), especially for an airport of this size that should have lots of competition. Perhaps because there are so few drivable destinations from Denver and air travel is the only option for most? Along this line of thought, aside from some really spectacular wilderness, there isn't a lot you can drive to. Albuquerque... then maybe SLC or KC if you are motivated. That's about it. The Denver bubble is quite nice, but it is very isolated.

I realize I sound a bit down on the city... that would be a harsh assessment, I do like Denver and have enjoyed it here so far on the whole. But it is a very different animal than the denser east coast cities I am used to (more so than I expected), and it's taking some time to adapt.
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