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Old 05-19-2013, 05:29 PM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Vermont in 2019
9,058 posts, read 17,371,622 times
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Minervah you are more than qualified in your observations, and to a certain degree btownboss had some valid points regarding the transient effect. Your stories of changing neighborhoods, densification, gentrification, disappearing ma and pa are fairly common in many cities like Boston and Seattle especially. Providence does have more of an old school tradition that neighborhoods like Federal Hill (Little Italy) seem to miraculously hang on to.

Where I strongly disagree with btownboss is his original point that Providence has more of a sense of place due to the transient effect in Portland. As someone who is pretty familiar with both cities of Providence and Portland as that what this thread is pertaining to, I have to say Portland has a lot more activity at it's core and around the city and has a more palpable sense of place. Regardless of who is coming and going, in my opinion the city is still both retaining and developing character very well.

One thing both cities share in common is a high element of creativity and arts and unfortunately high levels of unemployment as well. Neither city has a strong element of entrepreneurial activity when compared with many other similar sized cities, or neighboring larger cities like Seattle & Boston.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 05-19-2013 at 06:04 PM..
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Old 05-20-2013, 12:56 AM
 
Location: Pacific NW
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Yes, according to City Data statistics, Portland has 9.73% new residents (most from the surrounding counties) and Providence has 4.57% new residents (most from the surrounding counties). Portland lost 8.65% of its residents, and Providence lost 5.65% if its.

I've lived all my life in Portland, and while certain neighborhoods have changed a lot, and have a fair number of new residents ... it's not true of the city as a whole. Minerva happens to live in one of the more (currently) popular neighborhoods. I'm sure she's seen a lot folks moving in and out.

I've spent only a bit of time in Providence, so my views are skewed. But I don't see any comparison. Providence felt like a very small town. It suffered (for me) a bit by being so segmented. While certain pockets were really great, it didn't translate for me as a whole.
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Old 05-20-2013, 12:46 PM
 
9,972 posts, read 14,057,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
One thing both cities share in common is a high element of creativity and arts and unfortunately high levels of unemployment as well. Neither city has a strong element of entrepreneurial activity when compared with many other similar sized cities, or neighboring larger cities like Seattle & Boston.
Portland does have a lot of entrepreneurial activity when it comes to small businesses--it's just that the businesses are more likely to be microbreweries or a new bar or music club or yoga studio or butcher shop or landscape architecture firm or so on... I know a lot of people in their twenties who grew up here or moved here and started their own business--some have succeeded pretty well and some fell flat on their faces and the market for some things might be oversaturated, but I'd say I know more people in Portland who might start their own company as opposed to many other cities where people are more likely to just be satisfied with a job with a large coporation.

Of course that's the real issue with Portland--that there's isn't a large amount of corporate activity for the amount of people moving here who just are looking for an office job or IT work or so on. Nike and Intel have a huge prescence in the western suburbs, but Portland could use a little more larger and steady big businesses to sustain the overall economy. At the same time though, I'm looking at possibly just pursuing my own business opportunity in the next year--tired of being a damn wage slave. There's some money to be made in Portland in what Portland has become known for(good food, beer, music, and so on) and appealing to a growing tourist trade.

Last edited by Deezus; 05-20-2013 at 01:57 PM..
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Old 05-20-2013, 01:52 PM
 
1,189 posts, read 1,735,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
I think there was another thread on this a year or two ago, which I found by searching, but it only got 4 comments. Maybe people don't feel like comparing these two cities, well oh well...

They seem petty similar. Portland is twice the size of Providence, and I'm pretty sure it is much healthier economically as well. Still, they're both mid-sized, artistic (according to reputation) cities. Providence is probably much denser. Providence, I think, also has better schools.

Is there anyone out there who has been to both cities?

So here are some possible [generic] categories:

-food-Tie

-diversity-Providence because black people

-parks/natural beauty-Portland

-skyline(is this a legal category? "the cap on skyline conversations" says that one should search for skyline threads, but the only Portland v providence skyline thread is closed)-Portland

-arts(break into subsections if necessary)-Portland

-weather-Portland is warmer, gets rain and has more of a summer then providence

-nightlife-Portland but, ITS TWICE THE SIZE OF PROVIDENCE

-more cosmopolitan-Same as above

-downtown/neighborhoods-Providence, idk about portland's neighbourhoods

-culture-Providence

-other?-Overall Portland but its twice the size of providence as a metro area and 3 times the size as a city. How is this a fair competition?

Anyone have any thoughts this time around, haha
What is stated
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Old 05-20-2013, 02:49 PM
 
8,671 posts, read 8,821,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
Yes, according to City Data statistics, Portland has 9.73% new residents (most from the surrounding counties) and Providence has 4.57% new residents (most from the surrounding counties). Portland lost 8.65% of its residents, and Providence lost 5.65% if its.

I've lived all my life in Portland, and while certain neighborhoods have changed a lot, and have a fair number of new residents ... it's not true of the city as a whole. Minerva happens to live in one of the more (currently) popular neighborhoods. I'm sure she's seen a lot folks moving in and out.

I've spent only a bit of time in Providence, so my views are skewed. But I don't see any comparison. Providence felt like a very small town. It suffered (for me) a bit by being so segmented. While certain pockets were really great, it didn't translate for me as a whole.
That's because it really isn't one city.
Downcity is/was a trading post
South Providence is a fishing and container port
Northern Parts of the city developed as factory towns.
and College Hill is a college town
Federal hill is its own thing.
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Old 05-20-2013, 06:35 PM
 
Location: New London
1,713 posts, read 1,754,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercity View Post
Overall Portland but its twice the size of providence as a metro area and 3 times the size as a city. How is this a fair competition?

I don't know. Providence is more than twice as dense as Portland. I guess I just didn't realize how massive Portland is.
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Old 05-22-2013, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
That's because it really isn't one city.
Downcity is/was a trading post
South Providence is a fishing and container port
Northern Parts of the city developed as factory towns.
and College Hill is a college town
Federal hill is its own thing.
You mean as opposed to Portland (or any other city) which sprang up, full-grown, from the earth?
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Old 05-23-2013, 03:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
You mean as opposed to Portland (or any other city) which sprang up, full-grown, from the earth?
Portland grew about one central area. when the industrial Revolution hit New England, costal cities populations migrated up to the fall line, in Boston that was Dorcester on the Neposet, Waltham on the Charles, and Malden on the Mystic, they became independent communities from the rest of the region, they where factory towns plopped into a city, disconnected socially from the rest of the city. Some cities such as Worcester, Syracuse, and Manchester already had rapids downtown to feed their factories, so they became more cohesive.

In Providence it was North Providence/Pawtucket that became industrial because Downcity providence was on the Coastal plain so its rivers had no real energy to use, but rapids where there upstream, so completly seperated communities developed there.
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Old 05-27-2013, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,415 posts, read 10,060,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Portland grew about one central area. when the industrial Revolution hit New England, costal cities populations migrated up to the fall line, in Boston that was Dorcester on the Neposet, Waltham on the Charles, and Malden on the Mystic, they became independent communities from the rest of the region, they where factory towns plopped into a city, disconnected socially from the rest of the city. Some cities such as Worcester, Syracuse, and Manchester already had rapids downtown to feed their factories, so they became more cohesive.

In Providence it was North Providence/Pawtucket that became industrial because Downcity providence was on the Coastal plain so its rivers had no real energy to use, but rapids where there upstream, so completly seperated communities developed there.
Oh, excuse me. I didn't realize that you were an expert on the history of Portland. God forbid that I, who grew up in Portland, might know something of it's history and can say you are wrong. Portland did not grow up from one central area. It's a collection of many cities that were incorporated into the city of Portland, which included only the area that is now downtown Portland.

But, I'm sure you know much more about it than I might.
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Old 05-27-2013, 09:27 PM
 
8,671 posts, read 8,821,225 times
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Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
Oh, excuse me. I didn't realize that you were an expert on the history of Portland. God forbid that I, who grew up in Portland, might know something of it's history and can say you are wrong. Portland did not grow up from one central area. It's a collection of many cities that were incorporated into the city of Portland, which included only the area that is now downtown Portland.

But, I'm sure you know much more about it than I might.
The Port drove the growth of Portland, by the time the city Boomed in the early 1900s, the Flour mills were no longer a major player. (in fact that was why its not "Willamette Falls" area)
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