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Old 05-13-2013, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
1,105 posts, read 1,917,145 times
Reputation: 654

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Fact is, Baltimore can still accommodate more people.
Then why isn't it?

Arlington and Alexandria, suburbs of DC, now have higher densities than Baltimore. They're also far more educated, and growing much faster.

The whole Baltimore metro is growing very slowly. Baltimore, Harford, and Carroll Counties are adding about 6,000 people a year combined. Meanwhile, Northern Virginia is adding 10x that amount. The in-between counties, Howard, AA and Frederick, are adding just over 10,000 a year combined. Montgomery, a DC suburb, could be added to the Baltimore metro counties, and they still wouldn't add up to 1/2 of Northern Virginia's growth.

Downtown Baltimore's low education levels, aging skyline and cheap rents reflect a metro area that cannot attract many outsiders, whether the buildings are 5 stories tall or 50.
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Old 05-13-2013, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Baltimore Suburbs
2,583 posts, read 1,855,050 times
Reputation: 1320
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
Then why isn't it?

Arlington and Alexandria, suburbs of DC, now have higher densities than Baltimore. They're also far more educated, and growing much faster.

The whole Baltimore metro is growing very slowly. Baltimore, Harford, and Carroll Counties are adding about 6,000 people a year combined. Meanwhile, Northern Virginia is adding 10x that amount. The in-between counties, Howard, AA and Frederick, are adding just over 10,000 a year combined. Montgomery, a DC suburb, could be added to the Baltimore metro counties, and they still wouldn't add up to 1/2 of Northern Virginia's growth.

Downtown Baltimore's low education levels, aging skyline and cheap rents reflect a metro area that cannot attract many outsiders, whether the buildings are 5 stories tall or 50.
Harbor East, Harbor Point, Mount Vernon, Fells Point, Canton, Locust Point, Federal Hill, Otterbien. Are all considered downtown and are all educated and are all growing. Are you going off of stereotypes, or actual research? Sounds like the former.
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Old 05-14-2013, 06:02 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC
1,105 posts, read 1,917,145 times
Reputation: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Harbor East, Harbor Point, Mount Vernon, Fells Point, Canton, Locust Point, Federal Hill, Otterbien. Are all considered downtown and are all educated and are all growing. Are you going off of stereotypes, or actual research? Sounds like the former.
In DC, 51 percent of adults have college degrees, in Baltimore, just 25 percent do.

DC's population expanded 31,000 people from 2010 to 2012, growing 5 percent. Baltimore grew by a whopping 400 people over the same period.

DC's had 23 homicides this year. In spite of a smaller population, Baltimore's had 77, over 3x as many.

Baltimore's issue isn't how many people it can fit, but how few people want to live there.
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Old 05-14-2013, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Baltimore Suburbs
2,583 posts, read 1,855,050 times
Reputation: 1320
Census: Growth in D.C. region slows - WTOP Mobile
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Old 05-14-2013, 07:28 AM
 
7,817 posts, read 5,225,091 times
Reputation: 1379
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
You do realize that DC proper did not slow down right? All the exurbs and non-urban sprawl is what slowed which is great. The urban city proper did not slow down and will not slow down. People actually want to live in the city. Growth in the city is not just coming from people moving from outside the region. It's also people in the suburbs moving into the city. If you are waiting for people to stop wanting to live in DC proper, you will be waiting for the rest of your life.
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Old 05-14-2013, 07:34 AM
 
7,817 posts, read 5,225,091 times
Reputation: 1379
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
All of that 'my parents are from there' means nothing. Fact is, Baltimore can still accommodate more people. Jacksonville and NYC have absolutely nothing to do with this thread.
Unless you are going to give an educated synopsis for why you believe this, there is no reason to even continue this exchange. You have not given any facts about development, zoning, planned changes to the zoning code, anything......

This is all your opinion which is not going to hold up in an academic debate.
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Old 05-14-2013, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Baltimore / Montgomery County, MD
1,196 posts, read 973,706 times
Reputation: 467
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Should have gotten Walmart to pay for a light rail line. I'm sure they can afford it.

But honestly, if the streetcar brings so much development, then they should have run some tracks over there. H Street didn't really need it.
A Marc train stop should be built at NY ave and Fort Lincoln... or a streetcar spur from H street up Bladensburg road and over to Ft Lincoln. I say offer Walmart a tax break and get them to build the spur. The entrance to DC should not look like Rockville pike.
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Old 05-14-2013, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Baltimore Suburbs
2,583 posts, read 1,855,050 times
Reputation: 1320
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Unless you are going to give an educated synopsis for why you believe this, there is no reason to even continue this exchange. You have not given any facts about development, zoning, planned changes to the zoning code, anything......

This is all your opinion which is not going to hold up in an academic debate.
Developments: under construction or recently finished.
New Townhome Construction Returns to Camden Crossing
Mixed Use Development Planned for 2 East Wells St.
1901 South Charles (Video Inside)
Five New Townhomes Planned for East Randall St.
Harbor Square to Replace Old CVS
New Town Homes in Fells Point Baltimore - Fells Crossing
Plans Revealed for 1201 South Charles Street in Federal Hill

New apartments: 57 units in Canton | The Baltimore Guide
965 units under construction or recently completed in SE Canton/Brewers Hill/Greektown..Info courtesy of KLynch
101 Ellwood: Lofts & Apartments Overlooking Baltimore's Patterson Park
Mount Vernon Mill No. 1 apartments, with views of Jones Falls, are leasing quickly - Baltimore Business Journal
Developer moves ahead on 86-unit apartment complex in Station North
Construction begins on 102-unit apartment building in downtown Baltimore
Development News
Merchant Hill
Mission First Housing Development Corporation
Construction begins on North Avenue Gateway housing project - Baltimore Sun
Jefferson Apartment Group :: Jefferson Square at Washington Hill
http://thefrenchcompanies.com/wp-con...nts-Flyer1.pdf
LEED silver concrete construction in Baltimore, MD Bozzuto Construction - The Bozzuto Group
http://pmcmtvernon.com/
Uplands - Urban Convenience. Suburban Charm - Baltimore Community, suburban life in an urban setting.
New Construction Homes for Sale in O'Donnell Square - Ryan Homes
300 Cathedral St. to be converted into 59 apartments - Baltimore Business Journal
Union Wharf in Baltimore, MD 21231 - The Bozzuto Group
Fells Point Apartments | The Marketplace At Fells Point | Inner Harbor Apartments



Note: There's more development that I haven't mentioned. Tax breaks, enterprise zones, rehabs, aren't mention as well. Don't have the time or energy to get into it.
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Old 05-14-2013, 12:05 PM
 
Location: DC Suburbs of Maryland (by way of PA)
2,958 posts, read 4,222,271 times
Reputation: 2270
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
You do realize that DC proper did not slow down right? All the exurbs and non-urban sprawl is what slowed which is great. The urban city proper did not slow down and will not slow down. People actually want to live in the city. Growth in the city is not just coming from people moving from outside the region. It's also people in the suburbs moving into the city. If you are waiting for people to stop wanting to live in DC proper, you will be waiting for the rest of your life.
No one is arguing that DC is simply going to stop growing. However, you'd be delusional to think that federal government is going to keep fueling DC's growth rate at its current level. It's clear that DC had a very good couple of decades, but it is even more apparent that Federal growth (and all of its residual contributions to the economy) will be much more modest going into the future. To this end, it's very likely that the District and its suburbs will begin to see a decerlation in its growth rates and fall much more in-line with national growth rates.

Longer-term, I think Boston and Baltimore both are poised for success, with much more well-rounded, diverse economies than DC. Clearly Baltimore has now been included in the DC sphere of influence, but it still has a fairly independent metro region.
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Old 05-14-2013, 12:25 PM
 
2,363 posts, read 1,588,389 times
Reputation: 1431
So this has turned into another Baltimore vs. D.C. thread.......
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