U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which city is better?
New Orleans, LA 13 72.22%
St. Augustine, FL 5 27.78%
Voters: 18. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-24-2013, 04:19 PM
 
27,758 posts, read 24,774,360 times
Reputation: 16479

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
Shockingly, St. Augustine is not very prone to hurricanes. At least not as much as other areas in FL.
Right. That area of Florida has a little bend in the coastline, extending up to coastal Georgia, that somewhat shields it from regular hurricane pummeling.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-25-2013, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Denver
13,976 posts, read 18,711,525 times
Reputation: 8385
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
I've actually been to both places. There are a few spots in St Augustine that's older than America itself but other than that New Orleans is a more developed city. I have wondered what it would be like had St Augustine became a large major city. Just imagine what it would look like today. Should Jacksonville be able to claim St Augustine as part of it's metro since it's close by?
St. John's county is part of Jacksonville MSA.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
Shockingly, St. Augustine is not very prone to hurricanes. At least not as much as other areas in FL.
The fact that it's in a 'dip' doesn't protect it from a direct hit. New Yorkers thought they would never get hit with a storm and...
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
I was in Hurricane Andrew so the only thing I recall is that it went up towards Louisiana. New Orleans was spared I think.
I was pretty young when it hit so I don't remember it but it did the most damage in Cajun country along Hwy 90 and the Baton Rouge area. New Orleans proper just had some fallen trees and ripped off shingles. Don't think any damaging flooding occurred.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2013, 05:04 PM
 
27,758 posts, read 24,774,360 times
Reputation: 16479
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
The fact that it's in a 'dip' doesn't protect it from a direct hit. New Yorkers thought they would never get hit with a storm and...
Actually the geography of the coastline does protect it a bit, along with coastal Georgia. That's not to say that it can't get hit by a hurricane, but the geography of the area puts it at less of a risk.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2013, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Denver
13,976 posts, read 18,711,525 times
Reputation: 8385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Actually the geography of the coastline does protect it a bit, along with coastal Georgia. That's not to say that it can't get hit by a hurricane, but the geography of the area puts it at less of a risk.
I'm saying if a storm made landfall on Brunswick, the fact that the coast bends inward isn't going to make a difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2013, 02:49 PM
 
27,758 posts, read 24,774,360 times
Reputation: 16479
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I'm saying if a storm made landfall on Brunswick, the fact that the coast bends inward isn't going to make a difference.
But we're talking about the reduced risk of storms making landfall in that area due to the geography. I'm pretty sure we all know that it's going to do damage if it makes landfall; that's not in question.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2013, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Denver
13,976 posts, read 18,711,525 times
Reputation: 8385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But we're talking about the reduced risk of storms making landfall in that area due to the geography. I'm pretty sure we all know that it's going to do damage if it makes landfall; that's not in question.
Living with hurricnes my whole life, they do what they want. I hear what you're saying but a risk is a risk, if you are near the coast you are just as susceptible, minus maybe Miami who is just asking for it every season.

This may be very simplistic but there's a 50% chance of any city taking a direct hit, either it will or it won't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2013, 12:44 AM
 
27,758 posts, read 24,774,360 times
Reputation: 16479
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Living with hurricnes my whole life, they do what they want. I hear what you're saying but a risk is a risk, if you are near the coast you are just as susceptible, minus maybe Miami who is just asking for it every season.

This may be very simplistic but there's a 50% chance of any city taking a direct hit, either it will or it won't.
As a born and bred South Carolinian, I've lived with hurricanes and tropical systems my whole life as well. Living in Atlantic coastal states gives me a different perspective. When tracking hurricanes it's always easy to see that the bend in coastal Georgia and north Florida somewhat shields it from direct hits--which is why, if they don't hit peninsular Florida, nine times out of ten they hit the Carolinas which is where the coast starts jutting out a bit. Your experience living in a Gulf Coast state is different, because once a tropical system enters the Gulf, the entire coast is pretty much fair game. The geography is just different.

Risks can be quantified and there are factors that can minimize them.
Archives of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) show that northeast Florida has been hit by hurricanes much less often than the rest of the state. (“Northeast Florida”, for the purposes of this discussion, includes only the coastal counties of Volusia, Flagler, and St. Johns.)

According to NOAA’s records, since 1851, the area has been hit only once by what may have been a major hurricane (but perhaps not – see “Tropical Storms and Hurricanes”, below, for details). That was in 1880. In the intervening one hundred and twenty-five years only one further hurricane of any intensity has been recorded – Hurricane Dora, which made landfall in St. Augustine in 1964 as a category two storm. During the same period southeast Florida has had fifteen major hurricanes (category three and over), southwest Florida ten, and northwest Florida twelve.

This of course does not mean that the area cannot be hit by hurricanes – just that it has been hit by hurricanes much less often in the past than the rest of the state.
Karen Joyce Homes: Hurricanes in North Florida
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2013, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
5,793 posts, read 6,345,713 times
Reputation: 3135
Absurd comparison cause they are vastly different sizes, but I see the similarities for sure!

Anyway, when it comes to which one is better based on your factors, I'd say weather and COL tilt slightly to St Aug, while the rest go to New Orleans by a lot, if for no other reason than it having a much larger population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top