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View Poll Results: Who has the best infill redevelopment?
NYC 8 12.90%
LA 7 11.29%
Chicago 5 8.06%
DFW/Fort Worth 2 3.23%
Houston 6 9.68%
Philly 3 4.84%
DC 9 14.52%
Miami 2 3.23%
Atlanta 14 22.58%
Boston 1 1.61%
San Francisco/Bay Area 5 8.06%
Voters: 62. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-29-2013, 04:02 PM
 
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Master plan for redeveloping the central Delaware River waterfront (Philadelphia):

Master Plan for the Central Delaware
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:06 PM
 
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Atlanta still has a lot of good land to cover. I am also going to remain optimistic for the future and say that Detroit will redevelop within its city limits.
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,278 posts, read 7,233,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
I've lived in Boston and visited the rest. Just saying, the sunbelt metros have exponentially more land to redevelop. Anyway, carry on I suppose demolishing parking garages and such would qualify just as well.
That's definitely a fair point, but the traditionally dense, established cities have a place in this conversation insofar as there are plenty of examples in every city where space is underutilized, even if it is currently developed.

I know that, compared to other major Northeast Corridor cities, Philly actually has a good amount of vacant land, due to previous demolition of blighted structures/abandoned industrial areas. It's just that they're not necessarily wide swaths and create somewhat of a patch-work, especially in North Philadelphia.

I think infill development is extremely interesting, because it can dramatically improve the environment of a neighborhood if done properly.
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:09 PM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Vermont in 2019
9,071 posts, read 17,440,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
That's definitely a fair point, but the traditionally dense, established cities have a place in this conversation insofar as there are plenty of examples in every city where space is underutilized, even if it is currently developed.

I know that, compared to other major Northeast Corridor cities, Philly actually has a good amount of vacant land, too due to previous demolition of blighted structures/abandoned industrial areas. It's just that they're not necessarily wide swaths and create somewhat of a patch-work, especially in North Philadelphia.

I think infill development is extremely interesting, because it can dramatically improve the environment of a neighborhood if done properly.
You're right. I've reconsidered this topic and the cities on the poll since. I just don't see a whole lot of that happening in a city like Boston that's already well packed with infill, but even that city has opportunities in its outlying urban areas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LordHomunculus View Post
I am also going to remain optimistic for the future and say that Detroit will redevelop within its city limits.
Indeed, we're all rooting for Detroit. Any serious consideration beyond that is usually followed by "OK you go first!" Nonetheless I'd love to see it reinvented and succeed again.
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Is there a city in the United States that isn't filling in?

Or is this the same old story with homers eventually coming in here, listing a hundred projects like a two story gym and the price tag and acting like their own is the only one doing these things?
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:15 PM
 
787 posts, read 1,429,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Code Lyoko View Post
Is there a city in the United States that isn't filling in?

Or is this the same old story with homers eventually coming in here, listing a hundred projects like a two story gym and the price tag and acting like their own is the only one doing these things?
Ever city is infilling. Who is doing the best job of it and maximizing these development opportunities? One Planet Fitness definitely doesn't count.
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:17 PM
 
1,535 posts, read 2,270,316 times
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Seattle has great infill also like Stadium Place Development the largest T.O.D Development on the west coast. It will bring thousands of new residents, More Retail , Hotel, And office to Pioneer Square area of Downtown.
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakal View Post
Ever city is infilling. Who is doing the best job of it and maximizing these development opportunities? One Planet Fitness definitely doesn't count.
Of course it doesn't, I was saying that in jest to take a swipe at the types that act things like that are even noteworthy enough to talk about in terms of infill.

As for best, look into any metropolitan poised at gaining more than 500,000 people a decade (50,000 a year) and you'll see the list of places that will typically have about 25 + high rises under construction/about to launch construction (probably closer to 30 with the confirmed stuff for the next year and a half), over 10,000 + multifamily permits (a year), the fastest infrastructure changes, and well, yeah I guess a good load of all that suburban nonsense too while we're at it.

Basic list would trim it down to Los Angeles, Dallas, Washington, Houston, New York, Bay Area, Seattle, Phoenix, Atlanta, Miami, and Austin.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 07-29-2013 at 04:30 PM..
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,392 posts, read 10,018,360 times
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Some of these cities don't necessarily belong on this list. Cities that are still sprawling are going to have the most potential for infilling then cities that have long been built out. Cities like Houston and Dallas should win this easily.
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Old 07-29-2013, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,639,171 times
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Los Angeles is booming with infill but I don't think it has the best or most of it. Very little of it is poor-quality and nearly all of it is transit oriented or at least pedestrian friendly. There are some notable exceptions, like the Italian-esque stuff Geoff Palmer puts up along the 110 Freeway outside of DTLA.
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