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Old 08-02-2013, 11:11 PM
 
Location: 'Bout a mile off Old Mill Road
591 posts, read 602,790 times
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If you're originally from New England, move to Phoenix instead of Dallas in order to minimize culture shock. Believe it or not, the people and social culture of Arizona are not all that different from the people and social culture of New England, at least IMO. Dallas, OTOH, is a totally different ball game.

I'm originally from Rhode Island, and I've lived in Arizona for the past year. YMMV.
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Old 08-03-2013, 02:32 AM
 
81 posts, read 174,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZonaZoo View Post
If you're originally from New England, move to Phoenix instead of Dallas in order to minimize culture shock. Believe it or not, the people and social culture of Arizona are not all that different from the people and social culture of New England, at least IMO. Dallas, OTOH, is a totally different ball game.

I'm originally from Rhode Island, and I've lived in Arizona for the past year. YMMV.
This may be the oddest thing I have ever read on City-Data. The people and social culture of Arizona are not that different than New England? How so? New England is one of the most liberal parts of the country while Arizona is still fairly conservative. New England is home to some of the most prestigious schools in the country with some of the most educated people in this country. Arizona is the exact opposite. Without straying too far off topic, I will say that Dallas or Phoenix will offer just as much as a culture shock coming from New England or anywhere east of the Mississippi.
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Old 08-03-2013, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
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Neither Phoenix nor Dallas are culturally in line with New England, but both have such a high rate of out of state birth that it shouldn't be much of an issue.
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Old 08-03-2013, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,236 posts, read 25,930,159 times
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I don't know where zonazoo gets half the stuff he says from. But Phoenix is strictly Southwest while Dallas a fusion of South and Great Plains. Neither are close to being like Boston or New England.
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Old 08-03-2013, 09:29 AM
 
Location: 'Bout a mile off Old Mill Road
591 posts, read 602,790 times
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Not everyone from New England is from Boston, one of it's uppity suburbs, or a New York City bedroom community in Connecticut.

Get a clue.
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Old 08-03-2013, 09:31 AM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Vermont in 2019
9,046 posts, read 17,329,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZonaZoo View Post
Not everyone from New England is from Boston, one of it's uppity suburbs, or a New York City bedroom community in Connecticut.

Get a clue.
I think what they are implying is, what makes Phoenix so similar and easier to assimilate to and what makes Dallas more of a culture shock so to speak. Maybe a little elaboration would clarify.

I moved from Boston to Albuquerque so I'd be interested in hearing your point of view on this myself.
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Old 08-04-2013, 02:14 PM
 
Location: 'Bout a mile off Old Mill Road
591 posts, read 602,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
I think what they are implying is, what makes Phoenix so similar and easier to assimilate to and what makes Dallas more of a culture shock so to speak. Maybe a little elaboration would clarify.

I moved from Boston to Albuquerque so I'd be interested in hearing your point of view on this myself.
Like New Englanders, Arizonans aren't as friendly and gregarious around strangers as Texans are, and they will generally avoid eye contact with strangers in most situations. However, once you scratch the surface, most Arizonans are wonderful people who make great friends. As an aside, Tucsonans tend to be a little friendlier than Phoenicians, at least in my experience.

Arizonans, save those living in and around Scottsdale and Paradise Valley, tend to place less emphasis on their appearance unlike those in the trendy, popular Dallas neighborhoods and suburbs. Appearances seem to matter much more in the major metropolitan areas of Texas than in Phoenix and especially Tucson. Furthermore, Arizonans are not nearly as materialistic and status-conscious as Texans. Texans, especially those living in and around Dallas, tend to be much more obsessed with status and, in turn, are more concerned with status symbols such as homes, neighborhoods, cars/trucks, clothing, and so forth. However, most status symbols in Texas are material things. Outside of Greater Boston and Fairfield County, most New Englanders are not that materialistic and status-conscious. However, even in those aforementioned status-conscious areas, the emphasis is more so placed on what college or university you attended and/or what you do for a living (i.e., what firm you work for, your position at that firm, etc.) vs. whether or not you live in a 5,000 square foot home, drive a $75,000 Escalade, and/or wear a $10,000 Rolex. Overall, Texans are way more pretentious than most New Englanders and Westerners with the exception of Southern Californians.

Arizonans are much less noisy than Texans. People around here could care less if you're married or single, educated or uneducated, religious or irreligious, gay or straight, a homeowner or renter, and so forth. When conversing with Arizonans, these topics hardly ever come up within the first five or ten minutes of conversation because Arizonans, like New Englanders, shy away from intrusive personal questions because they're impolite, especially if posed to a person you've just met. That philosophy goes hand-in-hand with the let-and-let-live mentality that prevails here in Arizona and in most of New England. Moreover, the listed personal aspects/characteristics are by no means pretenses for friendships and/or romantic relationships among people out here because, again, Arizona, like the rest of the West, is a live-and-let-live place where people tend to "discover themselves" whereas transplants to Texas and, of course, natives seem to conform and "join the crowd," so to speak. Texas bills itself as a live-and-let-live place, but it's not really all that different from the rest of the South: you're pretty much an outcast if you deviate from the norm.

Now, let's talk about religion. Texans are a very religious group of people because, at the end of the day, Texans are Southerners. If you're not Christian and church-going, it's going to be much more difficult for you to navigate socially in Texas, especially if you're married with children and must resort to living in the suburbs, than in Arizona. Actually, this is a non-issue in Arizona, as it is in New England. Evangelicalism is frowned upon in the Valley in the same regard it’s frowned upon in New England. Phoenix may be conservative, but it ain't no Bible Belt town! OTOH, Dallas is practically the capital of the Bible Belt. If you’re coming from New England, you’ll feel as though there’s a church on every corner in Dallas, which isn’t that much of a stretch of the truth. Christianity and religious undertones are much more pervasive in Dallas than in Phoenix. Religious-themed billboards, Bible verses, and mega-churches are all over the place in North Texas. For someone born and raised in New England, Dallas is going to be much more overwhelming than Phoenix in this respect, regardless of whether or not you and your family are Christian, because that's neither the case in New England nor the West. Furthermore, like New Englanders, Westerners view religion as a private and personal matter; therefore, God and religion are almost never topics of conversation. Also, the separation of church and state is much more distinct in Arizona and the West, like it is in New England, than in Texas and the South. More importantly, there's no "good ol' boy" system of politics in the West.

Because people in Texas tend to be more religious, they also tend to be more socially-conservative. Even if you’re a social moderate who leans to the right like myself, Texas is going to be a much more overbearing environment for you because you're not used to in-your-face, extreme right-wing social conservatism. Most Arizonans are socially-liberal or moderate, fiscally-conservative folks who vote with their wallets and pocketbooks. More importantly, most people in Arizona shy away from discussing politics because it's simply an impolite topic of conversation. New Englanders do the same. Most Texans, by comparison, are socially-conservative and very vocal about their beliefs as well. That would be overwhelming to even a socially-conservative New Englander because it's something they're not accustomed to. Moreover, New Englanders are not used to people who wear their political and religious beliefs on their sleeves because your average New Englander is not like that at all. That's yet another reason why a New Englander would feel more at home in Arizona than in Texas because Arizonans don't do that either.

Overall, Arizona, like California, is overwhelmingly more welcoming to outsiders than Texas, especially if you're originally from the Northeast or Upper Midwest. As an aside, you'll never hear the term "Yankee" in Arizona outside of a history lecture unless you're referring to the baseball team. Most people who've lived out West for their entire lives wouldn't really understand, but that was the icing on the cake for me. YMMV.
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Old 08-04-2013, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
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^^^Yeah, most of that is garbage. Dallas is far more religiously diverse than Phoenix.

Dallas is hardly the capital of the Bible Belt since Protestant and evangelical Christians are outnumbered by Catholics.

I really question how much time you've spent in Dallas after writing that. My guess is you haven't. Youre relying on stereotypes to make yourself sound informed. The only thing accurate about it is that appearances mattering more in Dallas.

For the record, Im not going to bash Phoenix or rely on more than can be proven by statistical facts (like my first statement). Ill let other Phoenix posters make the arguments for their city. However, I will stand by anything I say about Dallas. Im from California, not a conservative, not an evangelical, etc. I have an amazingly diverse group of friends here and by the way, being gay isnt an issue here whatsoever. Dallas has numerous elected gay officials, a thriving gay community, and has a non-discriminatory ordinance to protect them (something Phoenix does not).

Bottom line, Dallas is far to diverse to be put in a corner like you are trying to do.

Last edited by Cowboys fan in Houston; 08-04-2013 at 03:07 PM..
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Old 08-04-2013, 06:49 PM
 
63 posts, read 98,232 times
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That was one of the more uninformed and useless analyses I have yet read on CD, ZonaZoo. Bravo.

Look at the decision this way - Phoenix is where you go if you can't afford LA.

As a Bostonian myself, I must say it is just like New England, though, except for the following things: culture, education, economic vitality, professionals, high unemployment, architecture, food, attitudes of people, anti-immigrant xenophobia, homophobia, racism, fatal heat, dust, strip malls, ozone, people who don't tuck their shirts in, real estate scammers, $2 corona happy hours that draw half the city, DUIs, meth labs, P.F. Chang's as "fine dining", title loans, gang warfare, drug smuggling, people who carry guns unecessarily, prevalence of custom rims, neck tattoos, UFC fans, teenage pregnancy, cactus, golf losers, obese cowboys, facist law enforcement, phony "libertarians", belt buckles, moster trucks, upscale bars that cater to 19yos with fake IDs, "Ultra Lounges", swingers, cougars, crappy sports teams and a few other related items. Feel free to ask for a few more.

Seriously, if you have a choice, go to Dallas - it is a FAR better place for a career, has a far better diverisifed economy, and while it is certainly not an East Coast city, it has a slight array of cultural amenities you might find comforting than Phoenix. If you were to hop an an airplane at Logan, not know where we you flying to, take a long nap, then wake up at your destination, I can think of no place that would be as disorienting as Phoenix in the short term and as stupfiying in the long term.
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Old 08-04-2013, 07:51 PM
 
Location: 'Bout a mile off Old Mill Road
591 posts, read 602,790 times
Reputation: 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darien_Rod View Post
That was one of the more uninformed and useless analyses I have yet read on CD, ZonaZoo. Bravo.

Look at the decision this way - Phoenix is where you go if you can't afford LA.

As a Bostonian myself, I must say it is just like New England, though, except for the following things: culture, education, economic vitality, professionals, high unemployment, architecture, food, attitudes of people, anti-immigrant xenophobia, homophobia, racism, fatal heat, dust, strip malls, ozone, people who don't tuck their shirts in, real estate scammers, $2 corona happy hours that draw half the city, DUIs, meth labs, P.F. Chang's as "fine dining", title loans, gang warfare, drug smuggling, people who carry guns unecessarily, prevalence of custom rims, neck tattoos, UFC fans, teenage pregnancy, cactus, golf losers, obese cowboys, facist law enforcement, phony "libertarians", belt buckles, moster trucks, upscale bars that cater to 19yos with fake IDs, "Ultra Lounges", swingers, cougars, crappy sports teams and a few other related items. Feel free to ask for a few more.

Seriously, if you have a choice, go to Dallas - it is a FAR better place for a career, has a far better diverisifed economy, and while it is certainly not an East Coast city, it has a slight array of cultural amenities you might find comforting than Phoenix. If you were to hop an an airplane at Logan, not know where we you flying to, take a long nap, then wake up at your destination, I can think of no place that would be as disorienting as Phoenix in the short term and as stupfiying in the long term.
Instead of attacking me, why don't you go outside and enjoy the lukewarm summer air while it lasts? After all, it'll be gone in less than four weeks.
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