U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-09-2013, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
5,583 posts, read 5,511,398 times
Reputation: 4814

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by homeinatx View Post
Dallas is my least liked of the big Texas cities, but it is quite a bit more urban, sophisticated and cosmopolitan than Phoenix. While Phoenix is close to much more attractive scenery, Dallas generally has much better cultural amenities (museums, music, theater etc), WAY WAY better restaurants, and consumer options. Phoenix increasingly feels like a poor man's Orange County without proximity to the ocean or Los Angeles.

Both MSAs have miles and miles of utterly generic suburban sprawl, but Dallas, at least has some great pockets of real urbanity. Uptown Dallas is quite a bit more dense and vibrant than anything in the vicinity of Phoenix. There is no warehouse district like Deep Ellum anywhere in Phoenix, no Phoenix bohemian neighborhood like lower Greenville or North Oakcliff, no Phoenix historic neighborhood of the scale and quality of the Park Cities, Lakewood or Swiss Avenue. While less pretty, Fort Worth is a hundred times more interesting than Tempe or Scottsdale.

I would agree with this from the standpoint that Dallas is a much more established community and has been the economic center, commercial center and cultural hub for north Texas, west Texas and to some degree Oklahoma for well over a century.

Phoenix was basically a little backwater town of 100-120 K (metro) in a state that was pretty much empty up until WWII. It has grown exponentially ever since. Dallas just had a huge head start.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-09-2013, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,282,670 times
Reputation: 10181
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZonaZoo View Post
Who cares which city is more urban, sophisticated, and cosmopolitan?

Not me.

HAS* much more attractive scenery. And much better weather, too.

I really don't care about museums, theater, opera, and all those other "cultural amenities" that are so highly-regarded on this forum. At all.

Sorry.

I prefer Sonoran Mexican food over that Tex-Mex garbage.

Also, I'm willing to bet that the Italian restaurants in and around Phoenix are much, much better than Italian restaurants in Dallas due Phoenix's much larger Italian-American population, most of whom are transplants from the Northeast, Midwest, and California.

Oh, yeah, bro? It's Dallas, a.k.a. L.A. wannabe-land. Pot, meet kettle. Haha, I'd rather live in OC-Lite than LA-Lite.

By the way, what the heck is Dallas close to? Definitely not mountains, oceans, forests, or deserts. I guess it's close to Oklahoma City...

I did the whole dense thing. It's nothing to write home about, especially in a city with horrendous weather like Dallas.

Warehouses are a sickening reminder of Rhode Island, which is where I grew up. Yeah, no thanks.

I'm from one of the oldest towns in America--I've been in way too many 100+ year-old structures. Old homes and buildings give me the creeps.

Scottsdale > Fort Worth. All day.
1) This is city data. Most people on here care about urbanity and sophistication. The fact that you dont doesnt really make your case.

2) I agree that Phoenix has better scenery and places within driving distance overall, but I have a feeling you really dont know what is around Dallas. For example, the below are only a two hour drive from Dallas:

Ouachita Mountains - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

3) Again, most people on CD (and a majority of people in general) do care about those things.

4) Sonoran Mexican food is very good, however most of whats available in Dallas isnt Tex-Mex. Most Mexican food here is central Mexican cuisine (lots of Pastor, Mole, and the like).

5) Italian is not going to be a specialty of either city. I know of 2-3 places in Dallas that could compete in the northeast. The rest arent that great. Phoenix may very well have better Italian. However, Dallas offers a much wider range of ethnic food options either way.

6) The whole mini-LA or LA-wannabe title is thrown around too much. The cities are products of the people who live there. Phoenix has a higher out of state birth rate and Dallas has a higher foreign born birth rate. Both are more than half born out of state. Given that, niether is the stereotype of their surroundings.

7) I actually agree with you there. I didnt prefer Chicago for that reason. Density is not a good thing for me.

8) I STRONGLY disagree that Scottsdale > Fort Worth. No way on earth. Fort Worth has so much character, is so authentic, has such great food and culture, and contrasts Dallas much more so than Scottsdale.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2013, 01:13 PM
 
2,459 posts, read 4,670,496 times
Reputation: 4403
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterlemonjello View Post
1) This is city data. Most people on here care about urbanity and sophistication. The fact that you dont doesnt really make your case.

2) I agree that Phoenix has better scenery and places within driving distance overall, but I have a feeling you really dont know what is around Dallas. For example, the below are only a two hour drive from Dallas:

Ouachita Mountains - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Actually just over 4 hours. 262 miles
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2013, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,282,670 times
Reputation: 10181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ankhharu View Post
Actually just over 4 hours. 262 miles
Just did it last week. Dallas to Beavers Bend (which is in the Ouachita mountains) is just under 2.5 hours. Its 190 miles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2013, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas
930 posts, read 1,238,327 times
Reputation: 1150
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZonaZoo View Post
Like New Englanders, Arizonans aren't as friendly and gregarious around strangers as Texans are, and they will generally avoid eye contact with strangers in most situations. However, once you scratch the surface, most Arizonans are wonderful people who make great friends. As an aside, Tucsonans tend to be a little friendlier than Phoenicians, at least in my experience.

Arizonans, save those living in and around Scottsdale and Paradise Valley, tend to place less emphasis on their appearance unlike those in the trendy, popular Dallas neighborhoods and suburbs. Appearances seem to matter much more in the major metropolitan areas of Texas than in Phoenix and especially Tucson. Furthermore, Arizonans are not nearly as materialistic and status-conscious as Texans. Texans, especially those living in and around Dallas, tend to be much more obsessed with status and, in turn, are more concerned with status symbols such as homes, neighborhoods, cars/trucks, clothing, and so forth. However, most status symbols in Texas are material things. Outside of Greater Boston and Fairfield County, most New Englanders are not that materialistic and status-conscious. However, even in those aforementioned status-conscious areas, the emphasis is more so placed on what college or university you attended and/or what you do for a living (i.e., what firm you work for, your position at that firm, etc.) vs. whether or not you live in a 5,000 square foot home, drive a $75,000 Escalade, and/or wear a $10,000 Rolex. Overall, Texans are way more pretentious than most New Englanders and Westerners with the exception of Southern Californians.

Arizonans are much less noisy than Texans. People around here could care less if you're married or single, educated or uneducated, religious or irreligious, gay or straight, a homeowner or renter, and so forth. When conversing with Arizonans, these topics hardly ever come up within the first five or ten minutes of conversation because Arizonans, like New Englanders, shy away from intrusive personal questions because they're impolite, especially if posed to a person you've just met. That philosophy goes hand-in-hand with the let-and-let-live mentality that prevails here in Arizona and in most of New England. Moreover, the listed personal aspects/characteristics are by no means pretenses for friendships and/or romantic relationships among people out here because, again, Arizona, like the rest of the West, is a live-and-let-live place where people tend to "discover themselves" whereas transplants to Texas and, of course, natives seem to conform and "join the crowd," so to speak. Texas bills itself as a live-and-let-live place, but it's not really all that different from the rest of the South: you're pretty much an outcast if you deviate from the norm.

Now, let's talk about religion. Texans are a very religious group of people because, at the end of the day, Texans are Southerners. If you're not Christian and church-going, it's going to be much more difficult for you to navigate socially in Texas, especially if you're married with children and must resort to living in the suburbs, than in Arizona. Actually, this is a non-issue in Arizona, as it is in New England. Evangelicalism is frowned upon in the Valley in the same regard itís frowned upon in New England. Phoenix may be conservative, but it ain't no Bible Belt town! OTOH, Dallas is practically the capital of the Bible Belt. If youíre coming from New England, youíll feel as though thereís a church on every corner in Dallas, which isnít that much of a stretch of the truth. Christianity and religious undertones are much more pervasive in Dallas than in Phoenix. Religious-themed billboards, Bible verses, and mega-churches are all over the place in North Texas. For someone born and raised in New England, Dallas is going to be much more overwhelming than Phoenix in this respect, regardless of whether or not you and your family are Christian, because that's neither the case in New England nor the West. Furthermore, like New Englanders, Westerners view religion as a private and personal matter; therefore, God and religion are almost never topics of conversation. Also, the separation of church and state is much more distinct in Arizona and the West, like it is in New England, than in Texas and the South. More importantly, there's no "good ol' boy" system of politics in the West.

Because people in Texas tend to be more religious, they also tend to be more socially-conservative. Even if youíre a social moderate who leans to the right like myself, Texas is going to be a much more overbearing environment for you because you're not used to in-your-face, extreme right-wing social conservatism. Most Arizonans are socially-liberal or moderate, fiscally-conservative folks who vote with their wallets and pocketbooks. More importantly, most people in Arizona shy away from discussing politics because it's simply an impolite topic of conversation. New Englanders do the same. Most Texans, by comparison, are socially-conservative and very vocal about their beliefs as well. That would be overwhelming to even a socially-conservative New Englander because it's something they're not accustomed to. Moreover, New Englanders are not used to people who wear their political and religious beliefs on their sleeves because your average New Englander is not like that at all. That's yet another reason why a New Englander would feel more at home in Arizona than in Texas because Arizonans don't do that either.

Overall, Arizona, like California, is overwhelmingly more welcoming to outsiders than Texas, especially if you're originally from the Northeast or Upper Midwest. As an aside, you'll never hear the term "Yankee" in Arizona outside of a history lecture unless you're referring to the baseball team. Most people who've lived out West for their entire lives wouldn't really understand, but that was the icing on the cake for me. YMMV.
Change Texans to Dallasites in a couple spots (mostly the materialistic parts and noisy parts) and this post is spot on. Couldn't have said it better myself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2013, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,282,670 times
Reputation: 10181
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppingDFW View Post
Change Texans to Dallasites in a couple spots (mostly the materialistic parts and noisy parts) and this post is spot on. Couldn't have said it better myself.
Except that the post you quoted was from someone whom has never been to Dallas.

Last edited by Cowboys fan in Houston; 08-13-2013 at 09:39 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top